Softpanorama

Home Switchboard Unix Administration Red Hat TCP/IP Networks Neoliberalism Toxic Managers
May the source be with you, but remember the KISS principle ;-)
Bigger doesn't imply better. Bigger often is a sign of obesity, of lost control, of overcomplexity, of cancerous cells

Software Architecture Books

Amazon.com buying info Software Architect Bootcamp

by Raphael C. Malveau, Thomas Mowbray
Our Price: $49.00
Paperback - 340 pages (October 18, 2000)
Prentice Hall; ISBN: 0130274070 ; Dimensions (in inches): 0.90 x 9.25 x 7.05
Amazon.com Sales Rank: 67,520
Average Customer Rating: 2.4 out of 5 stars Based on 8 reviews. Write a review.
          The first chapter (available online) is very impressive. 
 
3 of 5 stars A Game of Two Halves, March 18, 2001
Reviewer: Andrew Johnston from LEATHERHEAD United Kingdom
Like the famous description of soccer, this book is very much a "game of two halves". Half the book, maybe more, discusses the role of a software architect - the architect's approach, attitude, responsibilities, processes and techniques. This is excellent: clear and concise, encouraging if you are a newcomer but still stimulating if you are a more seasoned architect. It is without doubt one of the best descriptions I have read.

Unfortunately, the other half of the book is less useful. The technical parts are either too simplistic, or too detailed when discussing a particular solution favoured by the authors. The text frequently tends to become a repetitive and thinly-disguised commercial for CORBA, and there is an obsession with standards such as RM-ODP which are simply not relevant to a great many commercial developers. The few examples are very simplistic, with no real discussion of many of the technical issues which a real architecture must address.

The book would have been much better for more care in its editing and presentation. The quality of proof-reading is in general poor, but becomes quite appalling in some of the technical sections - evidence perhaps that the authors allowed their technical stance to dictate a poor choice of word processor. The choice of diagrams seems random: some are good, but some difficult discussions cry out for a diagram (horizontal and vertical partitioning, for example), while in other places a diagram confuses where the text is clear. The reference list is incomplete, omitting even the authors' "primary" reference which is quoted, frequently, in the text. All this is doubly disappointing when you consider that one of the authors is the series editor, and both were co-authors of the excellent "AntiPatterns" book.

My advice: if you are happy with the technological side of software architecture, and want advice on how to be a better architect, then buy this book, but read chapters 5 through 9 before you even attempt to read the first part. If, however, you are seeking technical guidance in the real world of software from Microsoft, Oracle and a host of legacy systems, then look elsewhere.

 
Software Architecture in Practice (Sei Series in Software Engineering)
by Len Bass, Paul Clements, Rick Kazman, Ken Bass

Our Price: $47.95

Hardcover - 452 pages (January 1998)
Addison-Wesley Pub Co; ISBN: 0201199300 ; Dimensions (in inches): 1.46 x 9.55 x 6.57
Amazon.com Sales Rank: 13,749

Average Customer Rating: 4.6 out of 5 stars Based on 8 reviews. Write a review.
Rate this item to get personal recommendations.
5 of 5 stars Practical, readable, excellent, November 28, 2000
Reviewer: phamlen (see more about me) from Brooklyn, NY United States

I found this volume to be extremely useful. It contains very insightful commentary on what architecture is (a term that I find is misused a lot), what architecture affects, and how to evaluate the qualities of an architecture.

Two of their best insights for me:

* Architecture affects the organization of the company/business unit. (In my company, we didn't realize this and we failed to create an organization that could support the architecture.)

* Virtually any architecture can accomplish the functional needs of a system - what differentiates architectures are how they provide the essential qualities (performance, modifiability, maintainibility, etc.) to the product.

The book is strongly based in the real-world, with practical examples. I never felt they were straying into "theorectical" land.

I also bought "Applied Software Architecture" but didn't like it nearly as much - I highly recommend "Software Architecture in Practice"!

4 of 5 stars Close, but no UML, October 10, 1999
Reviewer: A reader from Exit 8A, New Jersey

The book is basically good. SAAM is useful. However, I am at a loss to understand why the authors have chosen to totally ignore UML, which is (and was at the time of publication) the de facto standard for representing software architecture. They have instead represented architectures in their own non-standard, which the reader is forced to learn to understand their diagrams.

UML is now as fundamental a piece of knowledge to the software architect as schematics are to the electrical engineer, and for the same reason - it is a common language of discourse, and is supported by the available tools. I urge the authors to publish a second edition with UML substituted for the ad-hoc diagrams.

Applied Software Architecture The Addison-Wesley Object Technology Series)\

by Christine Hofmeister, Robert Nord, Dilip Soni

Our Price: $44.95
Hardcover - 432 pages 1 edition (October 29, 1999)
Addison-Wesley Pub Co; ISBN: 0201325713
Amazon.com Sales Rank: 36,469

Average Customer Rating: 4.3 out of 5 stars Based on 3 reviews. 
table of contents

3 of 5 stars Good in essence, lower in form, December 4, 2000
Reviewer: Christophe Addinquy (see more about me) from PARIS, F France

This book try to tackle a very hard, even if not old problem : How to model the architecture and what approach can be adopted ? The high value here is : they do it ! I think the approach adopted here is at least a very good starting point and the multiple view approach looks like Kruchten's idea. Another good thing is the improvements proposed to UML for architechture. My highest regret is about examples proposed here : They are too complex and the ideas behind the approach is hidden behind the exemple themselves which are hard to understand. Moreover, we have four example, all seems to be real time example. I would like to have several domain here, like B2B architechture and classic IS architecture. Finally, it's a pitty to gives only 3 stars for a book where I feel 5 stars possible...

Business Component Factory A Comprehensive Overview of Component-Based Development for the Enterprise

Our Price: $49.99

Hardcover - 608 pages 1 edition (December 20, 1999)
John Wiley & Sons; ISBN: 0471327603 ; Dimensions (in inches): 1.78 x 9.55 x 7.81

Amazon.com Sales Rank: 17,563
Average Customer Rating: 4.2 out of 5 stars Based on 10 reviews. 
5 of 5 stars One of the most important books I've read in the last 10 yea, March 22, 2000
Reviewer: Jonathan Scarborough (see more about me) from San Francisco, California

There are a lot of books out there that discuss component-based development, but this is the first book I've read that details a complete methodology for making CBD work in the real world.

Many of the principles discussed in the book are either common-sense best practices, or have been covered by other authors in the past. This book, however, ties together a wide range of process and architectural concepts into a complete blueprint for creating a rapid component and application development "factory".

As the authors point out repeatedly throughout the book, many of their requirements for a true component factory do not yet exist in commercially available products. However all their recommendations have been derived from the real-world experience of Peter Herzum and his team creating such a factory. Most of the material is highly applicable today, and it also provides a glimpse into what the rapid development of business systems will be like as the technological infrastructure matures over the next decade.

This book has already had a profound impact on my thinking regarding large scale business systems development, and I know that I will be referring to it for years to come.

The bottom line - if you're interested or involved in component-based development, read this book!

5 of 5 stars Dispelling Myths, Doing it Right, August 1, 2000
Reviewer: James R. McElroy (see more about me) from Magalia, CA USA

As an OO practitioner and methodologist for the last 10 years, I found the Herzum / Sims book to be right on the money in several regards.

OO has a lot of theoretical ideas which just don't seem to pan out in practice. The Business Component Factory cleary explains why, and shows what really works in the true industrial setting. It is rich in practical advise, and low in BS. Very refreshing for the software practitioner who is frustrated by the OO theoreticians who spout their wisdom from the ivory towers, but have rarely, if ever, had to work on real projects.

Along these lines, the BCF book dispels the OO myth that all classes / objects must be as intelligent as possible, and admits that, in reality, it is often best to have "focus" classes. These classes contain the intelligence of a group of related classes (grouped in a component) and give the advantage of lower coupling for the other classes, and of providing a focus target for process and use case modeling. Hence, Herzum / Sims tie the use case models effectively to classes, then to components.

The BCF book also points out that components need to be "first class citizens" in the UML metamodel, which map from analysis through design into code. As the UML currently stands, packages and (UML-style) components fail miserably in this area. Herzum / Sims show how to get around this deficiency and model and produce large-scale software units (components) effectively.

There is much more to the book than described above, but the above two points emphasize that the BCF book is not afraid to take on conventional wisdom (even the sacred UML), to point out flaws in this "wisdom", and to discuss what really works. Highly recommended, especially for anyone working on large-scale system development.

5 of 5 stars One of the most important books I've read in the last 10 yea, March 22, 2000
Reviewer: Jonathan Scarborough (see more about me) from San Francisco, California

There are a lot of books out there that discuss component-based development, but this is the first book I've read that details a complete methodology for making CBD work in the real world.

Many of the principles discussed in the book are either common-sense best practices, or have been covered by other authors in the past. This book, however, ties together a wide range of process and architectural concepts into a complete blueprint for creating a rapid component and application development "factory".

As the authors point out repeatedly throughout the book, many of their requirements for a true component factory do not yet exist in commercially available products. However all their recommendations have been derived from the real-world experience of Peter Herzum and his team creating such a factory. Most of the material is highly applicable today, and it also provides a glimpse into what the rapid development of business systems will be like as the technological infrastructure matures over the next decade.

This book has already had a profound impact on my thinking regarding large scale business systems development, and I know that I will be referring to it for years to come.

The bottom line - if you're interested or involved in component-based development, read this book!

 

 Domain-Specific Application Frameworks Frameworks Experience by Industry

by Mohamed E. Fayad (Editor), Ralph E. Johnson (Editor)

Our Price: $64.99

Hardcover - 704 pages Bk&Cd-Rom edition (October 18, 1999)
John Wiley & Sons; ISBN: 0471332801 ; Dimensions (in inches): 1.76 x 9.56 x 7.80

Amazon.com Sales Rank: 53,052

Average Customer Rating: 4.9 out of 5 stars Based on 9 reviews. 
by Jan Bosch

Paperback - 400 pages 1 edition (May 19, 2000)
Addison-Wesley Pub Co; ISBN: 0201674947 ; Dimensions (in inches): 0.70 x 9.19 x 7.37

Amazon.com Sales Rank: 54,447
Popular in: Finland (#14) , Professional Organizations (#6)

Average Customer Rating: 5.0 out of 5 stars Based on 1 review. Write a review.
table of contents

5 of 5 stars Sound approach - ATAM proponents will like this book!, April 30, 2001
Top 500 Reviewer Reviewer: Mike Tarrani (see more about me) from Tustin, CA USA

This book provides an interesting and comprehensive approach to designing software architectures. The author crystalized four concepts that have greatly influenced on my thinking: (1)focus on quality attributes during the design and evaluation, (2) a rich set of evaluation techniques, (3) dimensional views of the architecture design, and (4) a realistic approach to reusability.

The author's treatment of quality attributes provides a good foundation for the design process. The author's method of linking quality attributes to quality requirements is plain good practice and bears careful reading. Traceability in any engineering or design effort is essential and the approach proposed needs to be included early in the life cycle.

There are major four evaluation techniques covered in the book: Scenario-based that examines software qualities within the context of scenarios; simulation techniques that model the architecture in a simulation environment; mathematical modeling that uses statistics, probability and other techniques to predict qualities such as reliability, etc.; and experienced-based reasoning (see Brooks' Mythical Man Month for a good explanation of that!).

Among the most powerful concepts presented is dimensional views, which decompose the architecture into component and system views; business, organization, process and technology views; and development, usage and evolution views. This approach ensures that an architecture's design proceeds in accordance with findings from a thorough analysis, and that all factors be considered and incorporated into the design. If you are a proponent of SEI's Architecture Trade-off Analysis Method (ATAM) you will see some similarities. However, if you carefully examine the author's approach you will see some gaps: the focus is not on trade-off points (although the dimensional views will certainly uncover trade-offs that have to be made), and ATAM does not address the evolution of the architecture. The product line approach proposed by the author does. Applying product line concepts to design and development promotes reusability, as well as providing a set of guidelines for evolving or changing the architecture.

Overall this is an excellent book that balances theory with a practical approach that is supported by case studies and real examples. I view it as a philosophy on architecture design instead of a methodology. It is a refreshing change from some of the architecture books I have read that are filled with dogmatic methods and "design in a vacuum". The approach proposed will link design to requirements, and will ensure that the architecture meets standards that are defined by quality attributes and not arbitrary design criteria.

Amazon.com buying info Fundamentals of Object-Oriented Design in UML (The Addison-Wesley Object Technology Series)

4 of 5 stars Very enjoyable and informative, October 28, 2000
Reviewer: Adam Rutkowski (see more about me) from Sydney, Australia

This is a book more about object-oriented design then UML. The first section covers the absolute basics of what OOD is. The middle portion teaches the reader how to use UML to depict their designs. The final section is a set of instructive essays, warning the reader of the problems and pitfalls that often occur in OOD, and how to avoid them.

Page-Jones has an excellent sense of humour, and his engaging style makes this an incredibly enjoyable book to read. You won't even notice that you're actually learning something! I also like the fact that he doesn't use a single programming language for his examples, instead trying to be generic, or alternatively, giving examples from C++, Java, Eiffel, and Smalltalk in turn. This makes the book accessible for all OO designers.

I wouldn't recommend this book to an experienced OO designer who wishes to learn UML. That's not the intended audience. For a new comer, who wishes to learn good design techniques from the start, this is the book for you.

2 of 5 stars don't buy this book if you are a professional OO-Developer, February 15, 2001
Reviewer: A reader from Berlin, Germany

Probably I should have paid more attention at the word "fundamentals" in the title, before buying this book.

The book contains a pretty basic and superficial overview of UML (Part 2), stuffed in the middle of an introduction to OOD/OOP (Part 1), and a description of good OOP principles (Part 3).

Skipping preambles, jokes, and trivial examples, the juicy information about UML can be read through in a couple of hours.

If you are familiar with OOP and you just need a professional tutorial on the UML formalism, you'd better look fo another book.


 

 

Software Architecture, Frameworks & Components: A list by Mike Tarrani, Consultant
(12 item list)

Object-based programming, UML and RUP: A list by Jean-Franзois Groff, Software guru
(9 item list)

Object Oriented Design and Analysis: A list by Janelle Jowsey, Software Developer
(12 item list)

Software Architecture: A list by Eoin Woods, Software Architect
(6 item list)

Requirements, Analysis, Design: A list by thomasvollmer, Software Developer
(5 item list)

Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture, Volume 1- A System of Patterns

Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture, Volume 2: Patterns for Concurrent and Networked Objects
by Douglas Schmidt, et al (Hardcover)
Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars
Usually ships in 24 hours

Software Architecture - Advances and Applications

Software Architecture for Product Families- Principles and Practice

Software Architecture in Practice (Sei Series in Software Engineering)

Software Architecture- Organizational Principles and Patterns

Software Architecture- Perspectives on an Emerging Discipline


Etc

Society

Groupthink : Two Party System as Polyarchy : Corruption of Regulators : Bureaucracies : Understanding Micromanagers and Control Freaks : Toxic Managers :   Harvard Mafia : Diplomatic Communication : Surviving a Bad Performance Review : Insufficient Retirement Funds as Immanent Problem of Neoliberal Regime : PseudoScience : Who Rules America : Neoliberalism  : The Iron Law of Oligarchy : Libertarian Philosophy

Quotes

War and Peace : Skeptical Finance : John Kenneth Galbraith :Talleyrand : Oscar Wilde : Otto Von Bismarck : Keynes : George Carlin : Skeptics : Propaganda  : SE quotes : Language Design and Programming Quotes : Random IT-related quotesSomerset Maugham : Marcus Aurelius : Kurt Vonnegut : Eric Hoffer : Winston Churchill : Napoleon Bonaparte : Ambrose BierceBernard Shaw : Mark Twain Quotes

Bulletin:

Vol 25, No.12 (December, 2013) Rational Fools vs. Efficient Crooks The efficient markets hypothesis : Political Skeptic Bulletin, 2013 : Unemployment Bulletin, 2010 :  Vol 23, No.10 (October, 2011) An observation about corporate security departments : Slightly Skeptical Euromaydan Chronicles, June 2014 : Greenspan legacy bulletin, 2008 : Vol 25, No.10 (October, 2013) Cryptolocker Trojan (Win32/Crilock.A) : Vol 25, No.08 (August, 2013) Cloud providers as intelligence collection hubs : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2010 : Inequality Bulletin, 2009 : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2008 : Copyleft Problems Bulletin, 2004 : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2011 : Energy Bulletin, 2010 : Malware Protection Bulletin, 2010 : Vol 26, No.1 (January, 2013) Object-Oriented Cult : Political Skeptic Bulletin, 2011 : Vol 23, No.11 (November, 2011) Softpanorama classification of sysadmin horror stories : Vol 25, No.05 (May, 2013) Corporate bullshit as a communication method  : Vol 25, No.06 (June, 2013) A Note on the Relationship of Brooks Law and Conway Law

History:

Fifty glorious years (1950-2000): the triumph of the US computer engineering : Donald Knuth : TAoCP and its Influence of Computer Science : Richard Stallman : Linus Torvalds  : Larry Wall  : John K. Ousterhout : CTSS : Multix OS Unix History : Unix shell history : VI editor : History of pipes concept : Solaris : MS DOSProgramming Languages History : PL/1 : Simula 67 : C : History of GCC developmentScripting Languages : Perl history   : OS History : Mail : DNS : SSH : CPU Instruction Sets : SPARC systems 1987-2006 : Norton Commander : Norton Utilities : Norton Ghost : Frontpage history : Malware Defense History : GNU Screen : OSS early history

Classic books:

The Peter Principle : Parkinson Law : 1984 : The Mythical Man-MonthHow to Solve It by George Polya : The Art of Computer Programming : The Elements of Programming Style : The Unix Haterís Handbook : The Jargon file : The True Believer : Programming Pearls : The Good Soldier Svejk : The Power Elite

Most popular humor pages:

Manifest of the Softpanorama IT Slacker Society : Ten Commandments of the IT Slackers Society : Computer Humor Collection : BSD Logo Story : The Cuckoo's Egg : IT Slang : C++ Humor : ARE YOU A BBS ADDICT? : The Perl Purity Test : Object oriented programmers of all nations : Financial Humor : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2008 : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2010 : The Most Comprehensive Collection of Editor-related Humor : Programming Language Humor : Goldman Sachs related humor : Greenspan humor : C Humor : Scripting Humor : Real Programmers Humor : Web Humor : GPL-related Humor : OFM Humor : Politically Incorrect Humor : IDS Humor : "Linux Sucks" Humor : Russian Musical Humor : Best Russian Programmer Humor : Microsoft plans to buy Catholic Church : Richard Stallman Related Humor : Admin Humor : Perl-related Humor : Linus Torvalds Related humor : PseudoScience Related Humor : Networking Humor : Shell Humor : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2011 : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2012 : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2013 : Java Humor : Software Engineering Humor : Sun Solaris Related Humor : Education Humor : IBM Humor : Assembler-related Humor : VIM Humor : Computer Viruses Humor : Bright tomorrow is rescheduled to a day after tomorrow : Classic Computer Humor

The Last but not Least Technology is dominated by two types of people: those who understand what they do not manage and those who manage what they do not understand ~Archibald Putt. Ph.D


Copyright © 1996-2018 by Dr. Nikolai Bezroukov. www.softpanorama.org was initially created as a service to the (now defunct) UN Sustainable Development Networking Programme (SDNP) in the author free time and without any remuneration. This document is an industrial compilation designed and created exclusively for educational use and is distributed under the Softpanorama Content License. Original materials copyright belong to respective owners. Quotes are made for educational purposes only in compliance with the fair use doctrine.

FAIR USE NOTICE This site contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available to advance understanding of computer science, IT technology, economic, scientific, and social issues. We believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided by section 107 of the US Copyright Law according to which such material can be distributed without profit exclusively for research and educational purposes.

This is a Spartan WHYFF (We Help You For Free) site written by people for whom English is not a native language. Grammar and spelling errors should be expected. The site contain some broken links as it develops like a living tree...

You can use PayPal to make a contribution, supporting development of this site and speed up access. In case softpanorama.org is down you can use the at softpanorama.info

Disclaimer:

The statements, views and opinions presented on this web page are those of the author (or referenced source) and are not endorsed by, nor do they necessarily reflect, the opinions of the author present and former employers, SDNP or any other organization the author may be associated with. We do not warrant the correctness of the information provided or its fitness for any purpose.

The site uses AdSense so you need to be aware of Google privacy policy. You you do not want to be tracked by Google please disable Javascript for this site. This site is perfectly usable without Javascript.

Last modified: September 12, 2017