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Replacing a Timing Belt on a Mitsubishi Outlander 2003-2006

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According to Wikipedia (Timing belt):

A timing belt, timing chain or cam belt is a part of an internal combustion engine that synchronizes the rotation of the crankshaft and the camshaft(s) so that the engine's valves open and close at the proper times during each cylinder's intake and exhaust strokes. In an interference engine the timing belt or chain is also critical to preventing the piston from striking the valves. A timing belt is a belt that usually features teeth on the inside surface, while a timing chain is a roller chain.

Most modern production automobile engines utilize a timing belt or chain to synchronize crankshaft and camshaft rotation; some engines instead utilize gears to directly drive the camshafts. The use of a timing belt or chain instead of direct gear drive enables engine designers to place the camshaft(s) further from the crankshaft, and in engines with multiple camshafts a timing belt or chain also enables the camshafts to be placed further from each other. Timing chains were common on production automobiles through the 1970s and 1980s, when timing belts became the norm, but timing chains have seen a resurgence in recent years. Timing chains are generally more durable than timing belts Ė though neither is as durable as direct gear drive Ė however, timing belts are lighter, less expensive, and operate more quietly.

... ... ...

Timing belts must be replaced at the manufacturer's recommended distance and/or time periods. Failure to replace the belt can result in complete breakdown or catastrophic engine failure, especially in interference engines.[4] The owner's manual maintenance schedule is the source of timing belt replacement intervals, typically every 60,000 to 100,000 miles.[5] It is common to replace the timing belt tensioner at the same time as the belt is replaced.

The usual failure modes of timing belts are either stripped teeth (which leaves a smooth section of belt where the drive cog will slip) or delamination and unraveling of the fiber cores. Breakage of the belt, because of the nature of the high tensile fibers, is uncommon.[citation needed] Correct belt tension is critical - too loose and the belt will whip, too tight and it will whine and put excess strain on the bearings of the cogs. In either case belt life will be drastically shortened. Aside from the belt itself, also common is a failure of the tensioner, and/or the various gear and idler bearings, causing the belt to derail.

The Mitsubishi 2.4 Liter SOHC engine is used in the Eclipse, Galant and Outlander. Many people are unaware that the engine is also used in the Chrysler Sebring and Dodge Stratus.  Itís important to know that the 2.4 is an Interference engine  that may end up with bent valves and possibly damaged pistons if the timing belt strips or breaks during driving. The motor includes a main timing belt and a smaller balance shaft belt. Both of these should be replaced at the same time. T

The manufacturer recommends that the timing belt be replaced every 60,000 miles. From the history of this engine, it's important not to exceed this limit by more then 10K.:

the 4 cylinder belts in the outlander usually last about 80-90 k miles. so don't wait.

The most vulnerable part is not the bet itself but the  the idler

I had the timing belt changed before 100000kms just so powertrain warranty would be continued. I agree that this timing belt agenda is premature because I inspected the belts and they showed no obvious signs to be changed at this time.

But the idler was a different story the bearing was definitely showing signs of fatigue. It was loose and greaseless. So was the serpentine idler that had started to scream every cold morning.

Mine is the MIVEC and as 2 belts in the timing mechanism one for timing and one for the balance shaft.


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timing-belt-replacement-questions.htm

mitsubishi-forums.com

Newbie, Jul 22 2008Post #1

Location: Va,USA
Drives: 2004 Outlander LS AWD

Hi there,

I'm coming up on 60k and calling around for some estimates on a timing belt replacement for my 04 Outlander LS AWD.

Should I automatically replace the water pump as well, even if there's nothing apparently wrong with it once they get the belts off? Has anyone had it go bad on them?

Is there any reason to avoid a non-Mitsu shop for this job if I have them do the water pump?

Thanks for your advice.

Jul 22 2008, 05:28 PM

Expert. Post #2

Location: Moncton, New-Brunswick
Drives: Mitsubishi Outlander XLS AWD 2004, 1984 Corvette, 2008 G6, 2007 Chevy Cobalt, 2010 Huskvarna YTH22V42LS

I presume you are at 60000 miles and not Kms. I have 163000Kms on my Outlander and I had my belt changed at 105000Kms. The water pump was not changed at this point because the mechanic said he had never seen one go bad before the 200000km mark. But what you should make sure they have in stock before they start the job is an idler pulley assembly which you should change at the same time as the timing belt. They showed me mine and believe me it was wore out. A little water pump leak can wait until your next belt change but if the idler goes your up the creek and so is your timing belt and maybe a few valves.

On your second timing belt change then you replace the water pump and idler again.

Newbie

Location: Cary, NC, USA
Drives: 2004 Mitsubishi Montero Limited, 2003 Mitsubishi Outlander XLS AWD, 1992 Plymouth Laser RS Turbo AWD

Just curious - how many of us changed the T-belt at 60K per Mitsu's schedule? I got both the T-belt and water pump done at 80K because 60K was just way too soon in my cheap opinion. I had the work done at an independent shop, but they used Mitsu parts. The dealership hours just aren't convienent for me. I certainly applaud anyone who has/will do it at 60K though. BTW, my pulleys were fine and didn't need to be changed, but I've got the non MIVEC model. Mitsu made a host of technical changes on the 04 MIVEC powered Outlander. I've got a list of the differences between the 2.4L and MIVEC 2.4L; if anyone is interested, let me know and I'll post them or email them directly to you.

Expert, Jul 26 2008

Location: Moncton, New-Brunswick
Drives: Mitsubishi Outlander XLS AWD 2004, 1984 Corvette, 2008 G6, 2007 Chevy Cobalt, 2010 Huskvarna YTH22V42LS

I had the timing belt changed before 100000kms just so powertrain warranty would be continued. I agree that this timing belt agenda is premature because I inspected the belts and they showed no obvious signs to be changed at this time. But the idler was a different story the bearing was definitely showing signs of fatigue. It was loose and greaseless. So was the serpentine idler that had started to scream every cold morning. Mine is the MIVEC and as 2 belts in the timing mechanism one for timing and one for the balance shaft.

Mitsu tech. For a LONG time.Jul 27 2008,

Location: USA
Drives: 97 diamante.

I normally do NOT recommend the water pump on any mitsu as they usually last forever.
HOWEVER... the 2.4 with the single serpentine belt has been eating water pumps for a few years, so I would say do it.

And dont wait TOO long. 60k may be a bit conservative, but the cost of going to long is a lot more than 5-600 bucks when the engine shatters.

Mitsu tech. For a LONG time.

Location: USA
Drives: 97 diamante.

the 4 cylinder belts in the outlander usually last about 80-90 k miles. so dont wait.

Newbie

Location: Canada
Drives: 2003 Mitsubishi Outlander

I just did my timing belt (113,000 km) both belts looked fine, but the tensioner and pulleys needed changing, they were showing obvious signs of fatigue, serpentine belt got changed too because it was badly cracked. The water pump was inspected and looked good, so they left it.

Total cost taxes in = $900 (dealership)

QUOTE (manybrews @ Jul 30 2008, 05:56 PM)

the 4 cylinder belts in the outlander usually last about 80-90 k miles. so dont wait.

I have a 2003 Outlander, 107,000 miles. I just replaced the timing belt. The original belt had a few nicks on the one side, but overall the belt showed no cracks or fraying at all. It probably would have lasted 5000 more mile without coming apart.
[/indent] It wasn't a big job, but not for the first time mechanic. Got to give it to the Jap's, they do some things to make working on these vehicles a lot easier.

Like rubber plugged access holes in the inner fender that give you access to the water pump pulley screws, just like the American cars,,,LOL.

It took about 4 hours to do the job, but I did allot of reading and had everything I needed to do the job. The toughest part was removing the timing belt sprocket from the crank, u need an impact to get this bolt out.(if replacing the balancer belt).
[indent]

That $1000.00 sure feels good in my pocket !!!!!!! (IMG:style_emoticons/default/thumbsup.gif)

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Timing belt (camshaft) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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