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[Jan 29, 2020] The Trump Impeachment A Clash Between America's Competing Elites by Kevin MacDonald

Jan 29, 2020 | www.unz.com

Donald Trump ran on a platform guaranteed to arouse the hatred of this elite. His immigration-related proposals and comments (e.g., " Paris is no longer Paris ," "When Mexico sends its people, they're not sending their best") and his advocacy of a non-interventionist foreign policy were red flags to an Establishment bent on massive immigration and endless wars in the Middle East to protect Israel. His victory was a hostile takeover of the Presidency, opposed by the entire spectrum of elite political opinion, from the far Left to the neoconservative "Right," and including Conservatism, Inc. cheap-labor lobbyists like Paul Ryan.

...So it's no surprise that Trump's actual election was greeted with quite unprecedented anguish and frustration. The Washington Post headlined The Campaign to Impeach President Trump Has Begun the day of Trump's inauguration. [By Matea Gold, January 17, 2017] (But in fact -- incredibly -- it dates back to even before his nomination).


Digital Samizdat , says: Show Comment January 27, 2020 at 12:14 pm GMT

So it's no surprise that Trump's actual election was greeted with quite unprecedented anguish and frustration. The Washington Post headlined The Campaign to Impeach President Trump Has Begun the day of Trump's inauguration. [By Matea Gold, January 17, 2017] (But in fact -- incredibly -- it dates back to even before his nomination).

In fact, right around the time of the Republican convention in 2016, James Kirchik was already openly stating that a coup against Trump was possibility, if he won the election. You can't say we weren't given fair warning.

https://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-kirchick-trump-coup-20160719-snap-story.html

I believe the present political crisis should be seen as a struggle between our new, Jewish-dominated elite, stemming from the 1880–1920 First Great Wave of immigration, and the traditional white Christian majority of America, significantly derived from pre-Revolutionary colonial stock but augmented by subsequent white Christian immigration.

But as Kevin himself later notes, Trump is such a raging Zionist and he's surrounded by Zionist Jews–including his own family! So I'm thinking maybe this is all actually a schism between rival factions of Jews: say, globalist Jews vs. zionist Jews. The WASPs, after all, are finished. They surrendered their country long ago.

The nascent elite defeated Sen. McCarthy, despite subsequent evidence that he was substantially right. Of course, it is simply a fact that the individuals caught up in the McCarthy accusations were disproportionately Jewish. McCarthy's crusade may be regarded as the last gasp of traditional America.

McCarthy himself was controlled opposition. Please note that he never, ever raised the Judenfrage in public. And with good reason: some of leading advisors, like the ultra-creepy Roy Cohn, were Jews. So 'Tailgunner Joe' was just more controlled opposition–and so were the Birchers, too.

I suggest that that the "visceral animosity" that I noted above is motivated by the parallels between Trump's white working-class base and working-class support for National Socialism in 1930s Germany. This phenomenon was traumatic for Jewish intellectuals, who at the time were deeply immersed in classical class-struggle Marxism. It was of critical importance in motivating the shift pioneered by Frankfurt School toward conceptualizing Jewish interests in terms of race -- that the real problem Jews faced was white ethnocentrism, the latter solvable only by propaganda efforts aimed at vilifying white racial identity (which soon became mainstream in the educational efforts of the Jewish activist community) and by importing non-whites in order to diminish white political power.

This! Jewish intellectual support for the working class a hundred years ago was purely and transparently cynical. In the 1930s, once it became clear that the working class was capable of acting in its own interests without the help of Shmuel, the Frankfurt Schoolers (who, as the name implies, originated in Frankfurt, Germany) were stunned. That's why hardly any Jewish leftists anymore give a rat's rumpus about the working class. And Bernie Sanders is just a relic of a bygone era assuming he's even sincere.

Bob Bishop , says: Show Comment January 27, 2020 at 3:54 pm GMT
Assuming eliminating the white majority is the goal, what are Jews supposed to do once they've accomplished it? This strategy seems self-destructive since all the other racial and ethnic groups being imported are far less tolerant of Jews.
Curmudgeon , says: Show Comment January 27, 2020 at 10:29 pm GMT
@Been_there_done_that In other words, fcuk the UN Declaration of Human Rights guaranteeing freedom of political thought.
https://www.un.org/en/universal-declaration-human-rights/index.html
Been_there_done_that , says: Show Comment January 28, 2020 at 4:19 am GMT
@Curmudgeon Regrettably, not a single country in the world fully complies with Article 19 nowadays; this standard appears to be just too difficult to live up to:

Article 19.

Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression; this right includes freedom to hold opinions without interference and to seek, receive and impart information and ideas through any media and regardless of frontiers.

GMC , says: Show Comment January 28, 2020 at 8:44 am GMT
The 65 Open, Unlimited , un Vetted Immigration plan that was lobbied ... passed by the team that killed JFK, knew exactly what they were engineering. Their plan to cut off the European white society and was the end game. 80 % of our immigrants prior to 65 came from Europe – after the 65 laws – only 8% were permitted. This is the Smoking Gun !..
Lockean Proviso , says: Show Comment January 28, 2020 at 11:04 am GMT
@Franz Has John Bolton flipped by leaking early drafts of his book and saying that he will testify if subpoenaed? Not really, he's now trying to help dislodge Trump from office because Trump is wobbly on starting a war with Iran. After the Soleimani hit at the behest of his administration neoconservatives, Trump's in-house nationalist isolationists then got his fickle, ADD ear and talked him down from further escalations. No real tit-for-tat came after the Iranian symbolic strike on a US empty hangar (one that was prefaced with a warning so as to ensure no US deaths). Rhetoric aside, both the Iranian leadership and Trump realized that full-scale war is a very bad idea for both Iran and the US.

The neocon element and their Israeli allies are unhappy to be derailed from their path to war, so they, including Bolton, probably now believe that it's time to remove Trump and replace him with Mike Pence, a 100% Useful Idiot for Israel. With Pence, and maybe an October/November Surprise, the vile, treasonous neocons would get the disastrous war with Iran they so desperately want America to fight on behalf of Israel.

By the way, it's important to remember that the Democratic leadership decided not to take their House subpoenas to court and to involve the judicial branch in enforcing them, which it ultimately would have. The Dems made a political decision to favor expediency over historic congressional prerogatives and power because they didn't want the impeachment to be near the election. Won't it be ironic if it ends up that Senate Republicans end up being the enforcers of subpoenas by using their political clout from being in Trump's party, all due to the book by a former staffer (and to backroom animosities toward Trump and to Senate interventionists such as Lindsey Graham and Mitt Romney).

This is a significant development.

Sean , says: Show Comment January 28, 2020 at 11:41 am GMT

Donald Trump ran on a platform guaranteed to arouse the hatred of this elite. His immigration-related proposals and comments (e.g., "Paris is no longer Paris," "When Mexico sends its people, they're not sending their best") and his advocacy of a non-interventionist foreign policy were red flags to an Establishment bent on massive immigration and endless wars in the Middle East to protect Israel.

While immigration was a big part of his appeal the longest running theme with Trump has been unfavourable terms of trade and military largesse undermining American primacy.

Saudi Arabia cannot defend itself. The US army cannot be kept in Saudi Arabia, and if the US wants the Saudi oil money to the kept in US bonds then the US must be prepared to use military force to defend Saudi Arabia. Iran already has the beginnings of an alliance with Russia and China having conducted unprecedented naval exercises with them recently. The Iranians have it in for Saudi Arabia. It really will not do to walk away from Saudi Arabia; does anyone think China would hesitate to build a base in Saudi if the Saudis decided they would be a better protector than the US? If the US withdrew from the Middle East, China would be in there like a shot, nothing would stop them. This is the same China that Trump opposed the so called free trade with that put people out a job who are killing themselves in the White Death with fentanyl that China funnels into the US.

DONALD TRUMP: THE MAKING OF A WORLD VIEW by Brendan Simms shows that for past thirty five years Trump has focused on on trade and economic power and his concern is with countries that either rival the US economy (especially China) or so called allies that undermine American strength by exploiting relations with the US. Since the 80s Trump has been extremely critical of Saudi Arabia , Germany, and Japan's failure to contribute to their own defence.

https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2020/01/27/private-trump-tape-bolsters-wh-impeachment-defense-but-deceptive-media-edits-focus-on-unrelated-ambassador/

Indeed, in his call with Zelensky, Trump spotlighted his displeasure that the U.S. was helping Ukraine while Germany and other European nations were not doing enough.

I will say that we do a lot for Ukraine. We spend a lot of effort and a lot of time. Much more than the European countries are doing and they should be helping you more than they are. Germany does almost nothing for you. All they do is talk and I think it's something that you should really ask them about. When I was speaking to Angela Merkel she talks Ukraine, but she ·doesn't do anything. A lot of the European countries are the same way so I think it's something you want to look at but the United States has been very very good to Ukraine. I wouldn't say that it's reciprocal necessarily because things are happening that are not good but the United States has been very very good to Ukraine. How about Germany opening up a pipeline into Russia? And we are supposed to be fighting Russia. So Germany is paying Russia like 2 billion dollars a month and they a member of NATO And we are paying 90% of the cost of NATO.

Anonymous [830] Disclaimer , says: Show Comment January 28, 2020 at 12:21 pm GMT
The hatred oozing from every pore of Schiff, Nadler, and the others mentioned cannot be explained even in part by hatred of the person of DJT, because none of them know him enough to hate him the way they do. The American tragedy is that average whites can't see he's a proxy for them and that that hatred is a brazen display of sanguinary intent about what they would do if they could, as happened in Russia a century ago at the hands of their forefathers.

Unless you've worked with them where they're running the show, such as, say, on Wall Street, you really have no idea how visceral their hatred for you is when they don't need your cooperation for something or other. In suburban NYC towns on Long Island and up in Fairfield County, Connecticut you've got thousands of nouveau riche goys working as traders on the Street tooling around in their Porsche convertibles in dusty pink baseball caps on Sunday mornings, worshipping at the bagel shop instead of church. They've got the money and they're surely not going to upset the apple cart for anyone. Mega-sellout Sean Hannity tops most of them, however, selling out his people and country with a straight face every night for a cool $40 MM a year, with a net worth of $250 MM, according to Forbes.

anonymous [245] Disclaimer , says: Show Comment January 28, 2020 at 12:56 pm GMT
For a different take, see Linh Dinh's prescient column of June 12, 2016.

Since at least the closed door reaming apparently administered after Helsinki in summer 2018, "Trump's lack of success in effecting fundamental change" is due to Trump's lack of EFFORT in effecting fundamental change. And the farcical impeachment is just puppet show turned up to 11, the latest, desperate way to stir up enough sheep to vote RedBlue and keep things just as they are.

zard , says: Show Comment January 28, 2020 at 1:57 pm GMT
The whole Impeachment is in MY opinion staged , another story , a fable designed by the worlds greatest liars . Cover up Epstein , cover up Syria and Saudi Arabia / U.S. military ops and Venezuela . Of course the Chosen Ones will give only the side of the news fit for the goy ..

The US deep state is planning it to backfire. Impeachment was proven to be Bill Clinton's ticket to a second term. They are also running nothing but losers on the Dem side of the contest. The last thing the MIC will allow to happen is for the people to elect a government to control their own lives or to control them. When they have hundreds of billions every year to throw around, all filched from taxpayers, with the money barons calling the shots of whom is to run for the top position, and mutually reticent about any real control from the people, they will use the impeachment process to ensure Trump gets a second term.

smiddy012 , says: Show Comment January 28, 2020 at 2:08 pm GMT
People who get stuck on "the Jews" become tiresome after long It is more accurate to point to elite families or institutions like the Rothschilds or Rockefellers, the Vatican, the Skull & Bones/Trilateral/Bilderberg types, the various secret societies and/or Occultist sects If you dig even deeper you may realize that archaic hominids and their hybridization with us plays a role going back millennia

The first problem with blaming Jews and/or Jewish systems is that it absolves non-Jews who partake and are just as effectually guilty as the Jews who do, so it is to some degree slave mentality (similar to how black liberals blame "whites" for everything). The other problem is that there are dark Occult sects whom historically use Jews as a sacrificial front; they'd rather Jews take the fall than "bankers", "Luciferians", etc., it's literally part of their playbook.

Just passing through , says: Show Comment January 28, 2020 at 2:48 pm GMT
@Ship Track If I remember correctly, many heavy industries in Germany during that time were not Jew owned, Hitler received the funding for his NSDAP from companies like Thyssen and Krupp. They donated because they knew Hitler wasn't really 'socialist' and wouldn't seize control of their industries, and that he would be a better alternative to the Communist parties that were on the rise at that time.

Jews have a complete stranglehold on most aspects of money in 2020, I doubt something like this could happen again, Zionists Sheldon Adelson and Paul Singer were donating to Trump after he won the primaries. All politicians can be bought these days and the buyers are always Jews.

Derer , says: Show Comment January 28, 2020 at 3:04 pm GMT
I am in a foreign country and must "rely" on CNN for the daily news. The CNN despicable insects reporting is so one-sided pro-Democrats that suggesting "CNN is to Democrats what Goebbels was to Nazis" is a very mild comparison. Instead of discussing Trump's defense team points they are deflecting by discussing Bolton book and pathetic Romney's hate. It looks like Democrats are now holding on to a razor.

Bolton wants to make money by selling his book unfortunately Democrats would not buy Bolton's book, hence create controversy, Trump slander and they will.

Really No Shit , says: Show Comment January 28, 2020 at 3:17 pm GMT
I've never commented without fully delving into an article but today is an exception because the rhetorical headline says it all: it's a clash of the competing elites of America and there is no two ways about it!
danand , says: Show Comment January 28, 2020 at 5:37 pm GMT
@Z-man "I'm still hoping he's playing 3D chess with the CABAL but that hope is fading fast. Lets see the particulars of this 'Deal of the Century' (rolls eyes)."

Z-man, this interview with Ann Coulter (I know, I know) is kind of fun watching for her comments Trumps "3D" chess. Actually quite a few of these PBS frontline interviews published on YouTube, Jan 13th, are interesting/worth a casual view:

https://www.youtube.com/embed/Mbn9DSr-ynI?feature=oembed

sarz , says: Show Comment January 28, 2020 at 5:50 pm GMT
@Ship Track

Wonderful analysis, but didn't Rothschild bail out Trump?

Thank you.

Yes, he did. More than that, Lord Rothschild's son was dating Ivanka. The big Jews were more or less united in the early years of this century, long past 9/11.

But at some point, in light of the repeated war games that showed Iran defeating the United States in a conventional war, it occurred to the financial powers that had set up Israel in the first place that Israel, much as they loved the idea, was getting to be too high-maintenance. Adolf Hitler had conjectured in his memoirs that the real reason a homeland for the Jews was being pushed was to give the cover of sovereign immunity to the deprecations of a criminal tribe. Let's say the main motive was utilitarian. And so the Yinon ambitions of Israel had to be pruned back somewhat. And so Obama did his nuke treaty. That's when the big-Jew split came about.

It's a family quarrel snd Trump is s dues-paid member of the Kehilla. But he's broken the rules of the biggest big Jews and has to be brought down.

"Cyrus card" doesn't doesn't quite render it right. Cyrus wasn't a Jew. And if you're keeping up on the impeachment, the Parnas recording showed that traditional Jewish religious concepts, specifically the Messiah, had to be explained to Trump. "In a secretly recorded video of a dinner with President Donald Trump, businessmen and Rudy Giuliani associates Lev Parnas and Igor Fruman draw a parallel between the president and the Messiah." (Haaretz) But the flattery that was on his wavelength and which he retweeted was" King of the Jews". What he wants is not, what the Adelsons have suggested, a book of his own in the Jewish bible like the Book of Esther, but to be thought of as the biggest Jew macher of all time.

Truth3 , says: Show Comment January 28, 2020 at 5:52 pm GMT
The so called 'Deal of the Century' has been unveiled

Abject surrender demanded of the Palestinian people.

See? Trump doubling down on what is 'Good for the Jews'.

[Jan 27, 2020] Why negative transportation indexes don't support a recession call by NewDealdemocrat

Jan 25, 2020 | angrybearblog.com

Every month for at least the past half year there is a spate of bearish economic commentary that relies upon one or both of two metrics: AAR rail carloads and/or the Cass Freight Index.

I have a post up at Seeking Alpha showing why the first measure is not a representative slice of transport as a whole, and the second has a history of being very volatile and with a slew of negative readings in the teeth of continuing expansions.

As usual, clicking on the link and reading helps reward me with a $ or two for my efforts.

Addendum: after I put together and posted the article, I came up with the idea of averaging the Cass Freight Index and the Dept. of Transportation's Freight Index after adjusting for the former's volatility (shown below). It gives us an even less noisy overview of the transportation sector, although it still does go negative during slowdowns without there being a recession. In any event, none of the current negative readings are sufficiently below zero to accord with recessionary readings over the indexes' short history:

spencer , January 25, 2020 10:12 am

Have you thought about how the rapid growth of online shopping impacts the transportation incidences.

With online shopping the final stage is shipping directly to the consumer rather than the retail outlet. I 'm an old man that takes probably too many different drugs. But I now get them online and have them shipped
to my home rather than going to the drugstore.

Amazon now has numerous warehouses and/or transshipping facilities so it is obviously large enough to significantly impact the data. Tesla does not even have a chain of car dealers.

So the fundamental question is whether or not the shipping indices are measuring the same universe that they did in earlier cycles.

Bert Schlitz , January 25, 2020 10:20 pm

Bad core real final demand ain't good. 4th quarter was the worst in 4 years. Bodes not so good in the 1st quarter.

[Jan 27, 2020] Everybody's Talkin' 'Bout Taxes especially Wealth Taxes and Mark-to-Market of Capital Gains by Linda Beale

Jan 27, 2020 | angrybearblog.com
Not surprisingly for those of you who are members of the ABA Tax Section, there is a meeting of that group next week in Florida when a thousand tax lawyers (give or take a few) will be talking about everything from basis to wealth taxes; GILTI, BEAT, Dual BEIT, to EITC. Yours truly will be on a panel of the Tax Policy and Simplification Committee, meeting Friday morning, to discuss how the tax system should respond to the wealth gap. Joining me on the dais will be Roger Royse (moderator and panelist), Rich Prisinzano from the Penn Wharton Budget Model, and Dan Shaviro, Wayne Perry Professor of Taxation at NYU and a blogger at Start Making Sense. We'll talk about the income and wealth gap data, including the different perspectives of Saez & Zucman, serving as wealth tax advisers to Senator and Democratic presidential candidate hopeful Elizabeth Warren; Penn Wharton Budget Model, applying a more standard budget model to determine harms and benefits of the Warren Wealth Tax; and Cato INstitute. We'll also discuss Sen. Ron Wyden's proposal for a mark-to-market system of capital gains taxation (including a lookback charge of some kind for hard-to-value assets, Prof. (and former Cleary partner) Edward Kleinbard's Dual Business Enterprise Income Tax proposal, and other means of making the regular tax system more progressive such as rates, removing the capital gains preference, and reinvigorating the estate tax that has been the object of a GOP murder squad for the last 20-30 years at least.

Meanwhile, today in Florida there was a Tax Policy Lecture at the University of Florida on Taxing Wealth, with Alan Viard, resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, David Kamin, Professor at NYU School of Law, Janet Holtzblatt, Senior Fellow at the Tax Policy Center, and William Gale, Arjay and Frances Fearing Miller Chair in Federal Economic Policy7 at the Brookings Institution.

Last fall, the Tax Policy Center held a program on Taxing Wealth (w ebcast recording available at this link ) with Mark Mazur, Ian Simmons, Janet Holtzblatt, Beth Kaufman, Greg Leiserson, Victoria Perry, and Alan Viard. Sony Kassam from Bloomberg Tax served as moderator. The link has a series of power point presentations from that meeting as well, for your edification.

Ian Simmons, for example, includes the letter from billionaires dated June 24, 2019, asking that "[ t]he next dollar of new tax revenue should come from the most financially fortunate, not from middle-income and lower-income Americans ." Such a tax " enjoys the support of a majority of Americans–Republicans, Independents, and Democrats ." It's not a new idea, since all those millions of middle-income Americans who own their home " already pay a wealth tax each year in the form of property taxes on their primary form of wealth–their home ." The billionaires are asking " to pay a small wealth tax on the primary source of our wealth as well "–such as Elizabeth Warren's proposal, which would tax " only 75,000 of the wealthiest families in the country " (those with assets over $50 million) and would generate an estimated $3 trillion over ten years to "f und smart investments in our future, like clean energy innovation to mitigate climate change, universal child care, student loan debt relief, infrastructure modernization, tax credits for low-income families, public health solutions, and other vital needs ." All this is necessary because of the wealth gap: " [t]he top 1/10 of 1% of households now have almost as much wealth as all Americans in the bottom 90% ." The signatories support a wealth tax because:

Janet Holtzblatt discussed whether wealth should be taxed, with a set of powerful powerpoint charts . As she notes, there are a number of reasons to think taxing the wealthy is a good idea because it (slide 4) :

Those not supportive (or, as JH puts it, "less optimistic") suggest that (slides 5, 7)

There are lots of issues with wealth taxes: (slides 8-20)

Greg Leiserson discussed the idea of mark-to-market taxation (an idea that Ron Wyden has endorsed), in " Taxing wealth by taxing investment income: An introduction to mark-to-market taxation " (Sept 11, 2019). The key to MTM taxation is that a tax is assessed annually on investments, whether or not they are sold or otherwise disposed of ('through a transaction that results in "realization" for federal income tax purposes). The burden of such a tax falls predominantly on the wealthy, since those are the primary owners of bonds, stocks, real estate empires, and pass-through businesses that produce investment income, as well as the appreciation of those assets that is taxed currently as a capital gain on disposition. Leiserson provides a chart (below) showing the nominal investment income of US households and nonprofits including an offset for inflation.

As he notes, much of this income is taxed at preferential capital gains rates, and much of the income tax is deferred because capital gains and losses are generally taxed only when the asset is sold. Deferral amounts to a reduction in taxes paid under time-value-of-money principles. But yet another way in which owners of investment assets escape taxation is the estate tax: appreciation in property in the estate (such as unrealized capital gains from stock that has appreciated in value significantly over decades) is never taxed, since the heirs get a step up in basis to market value, so that if the asset were then immediately sold, there would be no gain remaining.

MTM taxation eliminates the deferral advantage. MTM taxation combined with elimination of the preferential rate for capital gains would eliminate the preferential treatment of capital gains that exists in current law. Leiserson notes the difficulties for a MTM system: which assets are covered, rate of tax applied, and whether there are special rules for volatility. Further, "[ i]f a comprehensive system of mark-to-market taxation is enacted, then there would be no unrealized gains at death going forward, because gains will have been taxed on an annual basis, including in the year the person dies " so long as the system applies over some transition period to gains accrued prior to enactment. Otherwise, the system would have to tax gains at death (repealing step-up in basis rule) or at any other disposition, including gifts, to ensure fair and equal treatment. He suggests other measures–such as limiting the home sales capital gain exclusion or requiring mandatory distributions of pension account balances above a threshold, that would be reasonable in a MTM context.

One difficulty with MTM taxation is valuation of assets that are not regularly traded. Ron Wyden's proposal suggests a lookback charge–an additional tax payment for assets not subject to MTM taxation that is collected upon disposition to account for the deferral value while still relying on realization as a trigger for taxation. Wyden and Leiserson suggest different possible methods. One is to take the gain upon sale and allocate it ratably to each year between purchase and sale, compute the tax on each year's income at the rate applicable in that year, and then calculate interest on those unpaid taxes for the years til payment. Unrealized gains would be deemed realized on death or gift and taxed accordingly.

Three key ideas here:

image from equitablegrowth.org

Of course, while everybody is talking about taxes, some of that talk is the same old endless market fundamentalist myth (Reaganomics) about how tax cuts are what make the economy grow and will actually pay for themselves -- in spite of near 4 decades of evidence to the contrary, where highest growth rates have generally been in times of higher tax rates, with some consideration for stimulus impact of tax cuts after periods of recessions. See, e.g., NY Times editorial, There's No Such Thing as a Free Tax Cut (Jan 22, 2020).

The op-ed notes that Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin "r epeated the risible fantasy that the Trump administration's 2017 tax cuts will bolster economic growth sufficiently for the government to recoup the revenue it lost by lowering tax rates " [in the 2017 tax legislation] even though 2 years in, the " budget deficit has topped $1 trillion ."

This is because, as most of us who haven't drunk the Laffer-curve tax cut kool-aid know and the Times op-ed reiterates, " businesses responded to increased demand more than they did to the lower tax rates ." Nonetheless, we should not be surprised that the Trump Administration is talking about two "big ideas" for taxes if the man gets reelected: 1) cutting Medicare and Social Security: see, e.g., Trump Opens Door to Cuts to Medicare and Other Entitlement Programs , NY Times (Jan 22, 2020) and 2) passing another tax cut bill: see Steven Mnuchin Confirms Trump's New Tax Plan is Imminent , USNews (Jan 23, 2020). Those two ideas go hand in hand.

T hough Trump doesn't dare state what he is really doing to his base, who he has deceived with typical right-wing rhetoric into thinking that he is trying to rightsize the economy to serve them when he instead engages in class warfare to stuff his own pockets, he is hip to hip with Newt Gingrich's desire t o "starve the government" to create a huge deficit (we are up to $1 trillion in our new "gilded age economy") that then provides cover for the wealthy to suck in even more of the country's wealth by downsizing Medicare and Social Security, programs essential for those who are not among the wealthy.

[Jan 26, 2020] The Collapse of Neoliberalism by Ganesh Sitaraman

Highly recommended!
From the book The Great Democracy by Ganesh Sitaraman.
This is a very valuable article, probably the best written in 2019 on the topic, that discusses several important aspects of neoliberalism better then its predecessors...
Notable quotes:
"... For some, and especially for those in the millennial generation, the Great Recession and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan started a process of reflection on what the neoliberal era had delivered. ..."
"... neoliberal policies had already wreaked havoc around the world ..."
"... "excessively rapid financial and capital market liberalization was probably the single most important cause of the crisis"; he also notes that after the crisis, the International Monetary Fund's policies "exacerbated the downturns." ..."
"... In study after study, political scientists have shown that the U.S. government is highly responsive to the policy preferences of the wealthiest people, corporations, and trade associations -- and that it is largely unresponsive to the views of ordinary people. The wealthiest people, corporations, and their interest groups participate more in politics, spend more on politics, and lobby governments more. Leading political scientists have declared that the U.S. is no longer best characterized as a democracy or a republic but as an oligarchy -- a government of the rich, by the rich, and for the rich. ..."
"... Neoliberalism's war on "society," by pushing toward the privatization and marketization of everything, indirectly facilitates a retreat into tribalism. ..."
"... neoliberalism's radical individualism has increasingly raised two interlocking problems. First, when taken to an extreme, social fracturing into identity groups can be used to divide people and prevent the creation of a shared civic identity. ..."
"... Demagogues rely on this fracturing to inflame racial, nationalist, and religious antagonism, which only further fuels the divisions within society. Neoliberalism's war on "society," by pushing toward the privatization and marketization of everything, thus indirectly facilitates a retreat into tribalism that further undermines the preconditions for a free and democratic society. ..."
"... The second problem is that neoliberals on right and left sometimes use identity as a shield to protect neoliberal policies. As one commentator has argued, "Without the bedrock of class politics, identity politics has become an agenda of inclusionary neoliberalism in which individuals can be accommodated but addressing structural inequalities cannot." What this means is that some neoliberals hold high the banner of inclusiveness on gender and race and thus claim to be progressive reformers, but they then turn a blind eye to systemic changes in politics and the economy. ..."
"... They thought globalization was inevitable and that ever-expanding trade liberalization was desirable even if the political system never corrected for trade's winners and losers. They were wrong. These aren't minor mistakes. ..."
"... In spite of these failures, most policymakers did not have a new ideology or different worldview through which to comprehend the problems of this time. So, by and large, the collective response was not to abandon neoliberalism. After the Great Crash of 2008, neoliberals chafed at attempts to push forward aggressive Keynesian spending programs to spark demand. President Barack Obama's advisers shrank the size of the post-crash stimulus package for fear it would seem too large to the neoliberal consensus of the era -- and on top of that, they compromised on its content. ..."
"... When it came to affirmative, forward-looking policy, the neoliberal framework also remained dominant. ..."
"... It is worth emphasizing that Obamacare's central feature is a private marketplace in which people can buy their own health care, with subsidies for individuals who are near the poverty line ..."
"... Fearful of losing their seats, centrists extracted these concessions from progressives. Little good it did them. The president's party almost always loses seats in midterm elections, and this time was no different. For their caution, centrists both lost their seats and gave Americans fewer and worse health care choices. ..."
"... The Republican Party platform in 2012, for example, called for weaker Wall Street, environmental, and worker safety regulations; lower taxes for corporations and wealthy individuals; and further liberalization of trade. It called for abolishing federal student loans, in addition to privatizing rail, western lands, airport security, and the post office. Republicans also continued their support for cutting health care and retirement security. After 40 years moving in this direction -- and with it failing at every turn -- you might think they would change their views. But Republicans didn't, and many still haven't. ..."
"... Although neoliberalism had little to offer, in the absence of a new ideological framework, it hung over the Obama presidency -- but now in a new form. Many on the center-left adopted what we might call the "technocratic ideology," a rebranded version of the policy minimalism of the 1990s that replaced minimalism's tactical and pragmatic foundations with scientific ones. The term itself is somewhat oxymoronic, as technocrats seem like the opposite of ideologues. ..."
"... The technocratic ideology preserves the status quo with a variety of tactics. We might call the first the "complexity canard." ..."
"... The most frequent uses of this tactic are in sectors that economists have come to dominate -- international trade, antitrust, and financial regulation, for example. The result of this mind-set is that bold, structural reforms are pushed aside and highly technical changes adopted instead. Financial regulation provides a particularly good case, given the 2008 crash and the Great Recession. When it came time to establish a new regulatory regime for the financial sector, there wasn't a massive restructuring, despite the biggest crash in 70 years. ..."
"... Instead, for the most part, the Dodd-Frank Act was classically technocratic. It kept the sector basically the same, with a few tweaks here and there. There was no attempt to restructure the financial sector completely. ..."
"... The Volcker Rule, for example, sought to ban banks from proprietary trading. But instead of doing that through a simple, clean breakup rule (like the one enacted under the old Glass-Steagall regime), the Volcker Rule was subject to a multitude of exceptions and carve-outs -- measures that federal regulators were then required to explain and implement with hundreds of pages of technical regulations ..."
"... Dodd-Frank also illustrates a second tenet of the technocratic ideology: The failures of technocracy can be solved by more technocracy. ..."
"... Dodd-Frank created the Financial Stability Oversight Council, a government body tasked with what is called macroprudential regulation. What this means is that government regulators are supposed to monitor the entire economy and turn the dials of regulation up and down a little bit to keep the economy from another crash. But ask yourself this: Why would we ever believe they could do such a thing? We know those very same regulators failed to identify, warn about, or act on the 2008 crisis. ..."
"... In the first stage, neoliberalism gained traction in response to the crises of the 1970s. It is easy to think of Thatcherism and Reaganism as emerging fully formed, springing from Zeus's head like the goddess Athena. ..."
"... Early leaders were not as ideologically bold as later mythmakers think. In the second stage, neoliberalism became normalized. It persisted beyond the founding personalities -- and, partly because of its longevity in power, grew so dominant that the other side adopted it. ..."
"... Eventually, however, the neoliberal ideology extended its tentacles into every area of policy and even social life, and in its third stage, overextended. The result in economic policy was the Great Crash of 2008, economic stagnation, and inequality at century-high levels. In foreign policy, it was the disastrous Iraq War and ongoing chaos and uncertainty in the Middle East. ..."
"... The fourth and final stage is collapse, irrelevance, and a wandering search for the future. With the world in crisis, neoliberalism no longer has even plausible solutions to today's problems. ..."
"... The solutions of the neoliberal era offer no serious ideas for how to restitch the fraying social fabric, in which people are increasingly tribal, divided, and disconnected from civic community ..."
Dec 23, 2019 | newrepublic.com
Welcome to the Decade From Hell , our look back at an arbitrary 10-year period that began with a great outpouring of hope and ended in a cavalcade of despair. The long-dominant ideology brought us forever wars, the Great Recession, and extreme inequality. Good riddance.

With the 2008 financial crash and the Great Recession, the ideology of neoliberalism lost its force. The approach to politics, global trade, and social philosophy that defined an era led not to never-ending prosperity but utter disaster. "Laissez-faire is finished," declared French President Nicolas Sarkozy. Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan admitted in testimony before Congress that his ideology was flawed. In an extraordinary statement, Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd declared that the crash "called into question the prevailing neoliberal economic orthodoxy of the past 30 years -- the orthodoxy that has underpinned the national and global regulatory frameworks that have so spectacularly failed to prevent the economic mayhem which has been visited upon us."

... ... ...

[Jan 25, 2020] Rabobank What If... The Protectionists Are Right And The Free Traders Are Wrong by Michael Every

Highly recommended!
Notable quotes:
"... Yet it took until 1860 for the UK to fully embrace free trade, and even then the unpalatable historical record is that during this 'golden age', the British: Destroyed the Indian textile industry to benefit their own cloth manufacturers; Started the Opium Wars to balance UK-China trade by selling China addictive drugs; Ignored the Irish Potato Famine and continued to allow Irish wheat exports; Forced Siam (Thailand) to open up its economy to trade with gunboats (as the US did with Japan); and Colonized much of Africa and Asia. ..."
"... Regardless, the first flowering of free trade collapsed back into nationalism and protectionism - bloodily so in 1914. Free trade was tried again from 1919 - but burned-out even more bloodily in the 1930s and 1940s. After WW2, most developed countries had moderately free trade - but most developing countries did not. We only started to re-embrace global free trade from the 1990s onwards when the Cold War ended – and here it is under stress again. In short, only around 100 years in a total of 5,000 years of civilization has seen real global free trade, it has failed twice already, and it is once again coming under pressure. ..."
"... Of course, this doesn't mean liked-minded groups of countries with similar-enough or sympathetic-enough economies and politics should avoid free trade: clearly for some states it can work out nicely - even if within the EU one could argue there are also underlying strains. However, it is a huge stretch to assume a one-size-fits-all free trade policy will always work best for all countries, as some would have it. That is a fairy tale. History shows it wasn't the case; national security concerns show it can never always be the case; and Ricardo argues this logically won't be the case. ..."
Jan 25, 2020 | www.zerohedge.com

"When I used to read fairy tales, I fancied that kind of thing never happened, and now here I am in the middle of one!" (Alice in Wonderland, Chapter 4, The Rabbit Sends in a Little Bill)

Submitted by Michael Every of Rabobank

2020 starts with markets feeling optimistic due to a US-China trade deal and a reworked NAFTA in the form of the USMCA. However, the tide towards protectionism may still be coming in, not going out.

The intellectual appeal of the basis for free trade, Ricardo's theory of comparative advantage, where Portugal specializes in wine, and the UK in cloth, is still clearly there. Moreover, trade has always been a beneficial and enriching part of human culture. Yet the fact is that for the majority of the last 5,000 years global trade has been highly-politicized and heavily-regulated . Indeed, global free-trade only began following the abolition of the UK Corn Laws in 1846, which reduced British agricultural tariffs, brought in European wheat and corn, and allowed the UK to maximize its comparative advantage in industry.

Yet it took until 1860 for the UK to fully embrace free trade, and even then the unpalatable historical record is that during this 'golden age', the British:

As we showed back in ' Currency and Wars ', after an initial embrace of free trade, the major European powers and Japan saw that their relative comparative advantage meant they remained at the bottom of the development ladder as agricultural producers, an area where prices were also being depressed by huge US output; meanwhile, the UK sold industrial goods, ran a huge trade surplus, and ruled the waves militarily. This was politically unsustainable even though the UK vigorously backed the intellectual concept of free trade given it was such a winner from it.

Regardless, the first flowering of free trade collapsed back into nationalism and protectionism - bloodily so in 1914. Free trade was tried again from 1919 - but burned-out even more bloodily in the 1930s and 1940s. After WW2, most developed countries had moderately free trade - but most developing countries did not. We only started to re-embrace global free trade from the 1990s onwards when the Cold War ended – and here it is under stress again. In short, only around 100 years in a total of 5,000 years of civilization has seen real global free trade, it has failed twice already, and it is once again coming under pressure.

What are we getting wrong? Perhaps that Ricardo's theory has major flaws that don't get included in our textbooks, as summarized in this overlooked quote

"It would undoubtedly be advantageous to the capitalists of England [that] the wine and cloth should both be made in Portugal [and that] the capital and labour of England employed in making cloth should be removed to Portugal for that purpose." Which is pretty much what happens today! However, Ricardo adds that this won't happen because "Most men of property [will be] satisfied with a low rate of profits in their own country, rather than seek a more advantageous employment for their wealth in foreign nations," which is simply not true at all! In other words, his premise is flawed in that:

As Ricardo's theory requires key conditions that are not met in reality most of the time, why are we surprised that most of reality fails to produce idealised free trade most of the time? Several past US presidents before Donald Trump made exactly that point. Munroe (1817-25) argued: " The conditions necessary for Free Trade's success - reciprocity and international peace - have never occurred and cannot be expected ". Grant (1869-77) noted "Within 200 years, when America has gotten out of protection all that it can offer, it too will adopt free trade".

Yet arguably we are better, not worse, off regardless of these sentiments – so hooray! How so? Well, did you know that Adam Smith, who we equate with free markets, and who created the term "mercantile system" to describe the national-protectionist policies opposed to it, argued the US should remain an agricultural producer and buy its industrial goods from the UK? It was Founding Father Alexander Hamilton who rejected this approach, and his "infant industry" policy of industrialization and infrastructure spending saw the US emerge as the world's leading economy instead. That was the same development model that, with tweaks, was then adopted by pre-WW1 Japan, France, and Germany to successfully rival the UK; and then post-WW2 by Japan (again) and South Korea; and then more recently by China, that key global growth driver. Would we really be better off if the US was still mainly growing cotton and wheat, China rice and apples, and the UK was making most of the world's consumer goods? Thank the lack of free trade if you think otherwise!

Yet look at the examples above and there is a further argument for more protectionism ahead. Ricardo assumes a benign global political environment for free trade . Yet what if the UK and Portugal are rivals or enemies? What if the choice is between steel and wine? You can't invade neighbours armed with wine as you can with steel! A large part of the trade tension between China and the US, just as between pre-WW1 Germany and the UK, is not about trade per se: for both sides, it is about who produces key inputs with national security implications - and hence is about relative power . This is why we hear US hawks underlining that they don't want to export their highest technology to China, or to specialize only in agricultural exports to it as China moves up the value-chain. It also helps underline why for most of the past 5,000 years trade has not been free. Indeed, this argument also holds true for the other claimed benefit of free trade: the cross-flow of ideas and technology. That is great for friends, but not for those less trusted.

Of course, this doesn't mean liked-minded groups of countries with similar-enough or sympathetic-enough economies and politics should avoid free trade: clearly for some states it can work out nicely - even if within the EU one could argue there are also underlying strains. However, it is a huge stretch to assume a one-size-fits-all free trade policy will always work best for all countries, as some would have it. That is a fairy tale. History shows it wasn't the case; national security concerns show it can never always be the case; and Ricardo argues this logically won't be the case.

Yet we need not despair. The track record also shows that global growth can continue even despite protectionism, and in some cases can benefit from it. That being said, should the US resort to more Hamiltonian policies versus everyone, not just China, then we are in for real financial market turbulence ahead given the role the US Dollar plays today compared to the role gold played for Smith and Ricardo! But that is a whole different fairy tale...

[Jan 24, 2020] REALITY CHECK: Coronavirus fear porn

getpocket.com
Jan 24, 2020 | off-guardian.org

The Telegraph morbidly warns that it's "highly likely" coronavirus is already in the UK , whilst CNET tells us the deathtoll is spiking .

It all sounds very scary.

The reality is that 26 people have died.

For comparison's sake, 80,000 people died of flu in 2018 in the United States alone. (at least, according to the CDC ).

Coronavirus – or rather, this particular strain of coronavirus, as they are very common and mostly harmless – has had 800 reported cases to go along with those 26 reported deaths. That's a mortality rate of just over three per cent.

Further, we don't even know the details of those 26 unfortunate patients, it's entirely possible the 26 deaths are accounted for by the very old, the very young, or the immuno-compromised. But even if they're not 3 per cent mortality is not high.

The death rate of bacterial meningitis, for example, stands at about 10%. Meningitis is an unfortunate fact of life, but it's not a public health scare.

SARS, of course, was a public health scare – totally unjustifiably, as it turns out. Most of you will remember the SARS outbreak of 2002/2003 being similarly apocalyptically covered in the media.

In the end, over the course of just about a year 9000 cases resulted in 800 people losing their lives. These numbers are rough because, as a syndrome rather than a disease, SARS is difficultly to clearly diagnose. Assuming the stats are correct, that's a mortality rate of about 9% or three times this "terrifying" coronavirus.

The simple reality is that this new virus strain is currently affecting a group of people the size of a small primary school, and has killed fewer than a bad traffic pile-up or a medium-sized drone strike.

So why the lockdown? Why the fear?

Usually, that means at least one agenda. Maybe more than one.

The Ebola outbreak of 2015/16 resulted in large numbers of NATO-backed doctors descending on Western Africa to "assist". As a result, ebola vaccines that had been awaiting approval for years got a 2 year field study, before being approved .

During the 2009 "Swine Flu" panic , a German MEP accused the World Health Organisation of "creating a panic" in order to sell vaccines. Though the WHO vehemently denied this, an independent report later found that several of the "independent flu experts" that WHO consulted had financial ties to vaccine manufacturers .

Three years ago, the Zika virus had Floridians BEGGING to be sprayed with pesticides and had millions of genetically modified mosquitoes released into the wild. Considering Zika has never been scientifically proven to do anything by cause cold symptoms , that was a nice result.

If you're agenda-spotting in this case, be on the lookout for a "new" medicine getting rushed through patent offices. This anti-coronavirus drug will then be bought-up in huge amounts by hospitals and health services the world over.

Whichever of the handful of pharmagiants owns the patent will get a huge profit boom, plus the soaring stock prices that go along with owning the miracle cure to the scary disease du jour .

Longer-term, there is vaccination to consider. Medicine you have to take even if you're not sick is a goldmine for pharmaceutical companies, and if the government makes them mandatory (always an issue simmering on the back-burner) well, then that's even better. Not only does it mean they don't really have to work (I mean, how much work do you put into a product literally everyone is legally obliged to use?), but the opportunities for large-scale genetic research (and corruption) are endless.

Generally speaking, fear is always useful. If you can frighten people they do whatever you say. A fact known to leaders and propagandists for centuries.

Following the Boston bombing, despite the manhunt being for just two alleged bombers, the entire city of Boston was put on lockdown. The national guard rolled tanks down the street, and nobody said a word.

Right now, despite fewer than 30 deaths, millions of Chinese people are under a "lockdown". Public gatherings are being halted. That's power you can't buy.

It never hurts to normalise the idea of martial law. After all, you don't know when you might need it for real.

I know there is a temptation, in alt-media circles, to see China as a good guy just because they oppose US imperialism, but they have corruption and authoritarianism there too. Their officials are just as power-hungry as ours. There's no reason to think they wouldn't take advantage of a crisis (or even create one), in order to increase their control.

Hell, maybe there is no clear agenda at all. Maybe that's just the psychology of power. Maybe scaring people feels good, and maybe controlling them feels better. Maybe there's no point in doing terrible things to get into power if you're not going to use it for its own sake.

Is it possible there's more to this story? Some fundamental dishonesty most people never think to question? As always with the mainstream media, it's difficult to take anything for granted.

We don't know the casualty numbers are accurate, China could be downplaying the threat to minimise panic.

We don't know that the "lockdown" is as extensive as our media report, the press could be exaggerating to paint China as hysterical or autocratic.

We don't even know for sure the disease exists at all , when you think about it.

As usual, absolute scepticism is required. It's hard to say exactly what's happening yet, but when 26 deaths makes international news that means something is going on.

Stay tuned.


Petra Liverani ,

Kit, when are you going to acknowledge that the Boston bombing was a staged event? They couldn't make it more obvious. A man who has just had both legs blown off would not be whizzed along in a wheelchair.

https://wideshut.co.uk/review-of-jeff-bauman-legless-man-boston-bombing-conspiracy-theory-graphic-images/

Petra Liverani ,

Fear porn

Is it possible there's more to this story? Some fundamental dishonesty most people never think to question? As always with the mainstream media, it's difficult to take anything for granted.

Oh yes.

Wikipedia says:

Coronaviruses are a group of viruses that cause diseases in mammals and birds that include diarrhea in cows and pigs, and upper respiratory disease in chickens. In humans, the virus causes respiratory infections, which are often mild, but in rare cases are potentially lethal.

However, further down it says:

The virus was suspected to have originated in snakes,[12] but many leading researchers disagree with this conclusion [13]

Footnote 12 link takes us to this:
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/jmv.25683
Journal of Medical Virology
Global Health Concern Stirred by Emerging Viral Infections (January 22, 2020)
Abstract of Commentary

Emerging viral infections continue to pose a major threat to global public health. In 1997, a highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H5N1) virus was found to directly spread from poultry to humans unlike previously reported transmission routs of human‐to‐human and livestock‐to‐human, stirring a grave concern for a possible influenza pandemic.

Authors:
Guangxiang (George) Luo: Above article only article published in journal
Shou‐Jiang Gao: A number of articles co-authored

We are told:
This article has been accepted for publication and undergone full peer review but has not been through the copyediting, typesetting, pagination and proofreading process, which may lead to differences between this version and the Version of Record. Please cite this article as doi: 10.1002/jmv.25683

No mention of snakes in abstract and you wonder why that is.

The link to footnote 13 where the snakes theory is rubbished is found here.
https://www.wired.com/story/wuhan-coronavirus-snake-flu-theory/

"It's complete garbage," says Edward Holmes, a zoologist at the University of Sydney's Institute for Infectious Diseases and Biosecurity, who specializes in emerging RNA viruses, a class that includes coronaviruses like 2019-nCoV. Holmes, who also holds appointments at the Chinese CDC and Fudan University in Shanghai, is among a number of scientists who are pointing out -- in virology forums, science Slacks, and on Twitter -- what they deem to be major flaws in the paper, and calling on the journal to have it retracted. "It's great that viral sequence data is getting shared openly in real time," says Holmes. "The downside is then you get people using that data to make conclusions they really shouldn't. The result is just a really unhelpful distraction that smacks of opportunism."

Preliminary analyses of the genetic data released by Chinese authorities suggest that 2019-nCoV is most closely related to a group of coronaviruses that typically infect bats. But for a variety of reasons -- including that it's winter and bats are hibernating -- many scientists suspect that some other animal moved the virus from bats to humans.

Wei's team compared the codons preferred by 2019-nCoV to those preferred by a handful of potential hosts: humans, bats, chickens, hedgehogs, pangolins, and two species of snakes.

They reported finding the most overlap in codon bias between 2019-nCoV and those two kinds of snakes -- the Chinese cobra and the many-banded krait. Taken together, these results "suggest for the first time that snake is the most probable wildlife animal reservoir for the 2019-nCoV," the authors wrote. "New information obtained from our evolutionary analysis is highly significant for effective control of the outbreak caused by the 2019-nCoV-induced pneumonia."

Editors of the Journal of Medical Virology told WIRED they stand by the publication, which they say went through a formal peer-review process that found the authors' methods were solid. That process was expedited -- the reviewers were given 24 hours to comment and the authors had three days to respond. But given the need for public health information, they believe the speed-up was appropriate. "With this serious situation, with people dying, holding this paper up in review would be criminal," says Shou-Jian Gao, the journal's editor-in-chief. "This is intended to just open the scientific dialogue."

"It's complete garbage", "it's winter and bats are hibernating", "codons preferred by 2019-nCoV to those preferred by a handful of potential hosts: humans, bats, chickens, hedgehogs, pangolins, and two species of snake [the Chinese cobra and the many-banded krait.]"

"With this serious situation, with people dying, holding this paper up in review would be criminal," says Shou-Jian Gao, the journal's editor-in-chief. "This is intended to just open the scientific dialogue."

If this is science, I don't want it.

Dungroanin ,

Somethings ARE going on – THEY don't want us to know.

1. Brexit bs in 7 days – not the hard brexit THEY want, because they cornered themselves with a deal that keeps us IN for the next 12 months requiring compliance ha ha ha.

2. The Syrian escapade is OVER.
The Iran invasion is NOT going to happen. Iraq has a million citizens on the streets PEACEFULLY confirming to the 2003 invaders to really fuck the fuck off. (And out of the EU, they will not have us pushing them into ME meddling).

3. Russian bogeymaning is OVER. Russiagate is over. Ukrainegate is fucked because Biden & Son won't risk being questioned. Trump will not want anymore casualties because he proved that his military and MIC trillions can't stop the missiles turning the deep bunkers at their bases from being turned into giant acoustic brain soup drums.

But hey lets look over there – dem chinese have a flu and are taking precautions when most of them would be in transit for their new year and spread it faster than usual

The Empire is dead and no amount of Integrity Iniative bollocks and media management by the brass or Royal soap opera can hide the end of the grand game as losers.

Watch as the stolen election victory turns to ashes on their tongues – Corbyn may still notch up another PM before April.

Gall ,

Here's Jon Rappoport's take;

https://blog.nomorefakenews.com/2020/01/23/china-virus-epidemic-the-gong-show-on-roller-skates/

I tend to agree.

Richard Le Sarc ,

The whole thing is just another exercise in deeply racist and hate-driven Sinophobia. The Western MSM presstitute scum are virtually gloating over this affair, and, in the Guardian, of course, their resident compradore (beep) 'Lily' Kuo, in Beijing, has turned the whole thing into a great threat to Chinese stability, CCP rule and ' Emperor' Xi, of course, in an exercise in hate-driven hysteria that will surely get her a pat on the head from her White Masters.
The death-toll seems less than that in a typical 'flu season, mostly the old and previously unwell, as usual, but is inflated with pure malice and barely disguised satisfaction. The admirable Chinese efforts to curtail the spread of the disease are compared to so-called 'repression' of 'dissidents', and our ABC resident presstitute, Birtles, almost twitches with delight and animus as he relays his agit-prop. The Chinese are about to build a 1000 bed hospital, possibly in a weekend, while the UK NHS crumbles in the shite that is UK ' society', but now I recall that was euthanised by Thatcher decades ago. You can see why Western supremacists so hate China. And I would vouch that this disease, so conveniently ' emerging' right at New Year, possibly came via Fort Detrick.

Dee ,

https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(20)30185-9/fulltext

Willem ,

Many words for basically same thing as above

C: they also don't know what this is about (but don't want to admit)

I like scientific journals, more then newspapers as the scientific journals show the conflict of interest of authors. Guess what

' FGH reports personal fees from University of Alabama Antiviral Drug Discovery and Development Consortium, and is a non-compensated consultant for Gilead Sciences, Regeneron, and SAB Biotherapeutics, which have investigational therapeutics for coronavirus infections.'

Probably of 'no' relevance

RobG ,

The Spanish flu outbreak in 1919 killed way more people than those who were slaughtered in World War One (and that was a huge number of people).

I agree with Kit's premise here; RE: 'disease propaganda' and all the rest of it.

However, I also have to point out the obvious: unprecedented numbers of people are now dying from cancer. Here's a jolly Guardian piece from 2014

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2014/feb/03/worldwide-cancer-cases-soar-next-20-years

We're looking at more people now dying from cancer, on a yearly basis, than all the wars in human history put together. A greater percentage of people dying from cancer than ever died from the bubonic plague.

Cancer is a relatively simple one to sort out (and a lot of it comes down to diet -cancers feed on sugar, although very few oncologists will tell you that).

I would venture that our current tidal wave of cancer is largely due to psychopathy and its endemic corruption: Big Pharma doesn't want you to die, but neither does it want you well. Big Pharma wants you somewhere inbetween, where you are constantly ill and having to pay for their 'cures'.

As an aside, can anyone name me a single member of the UK royal family (and there's an awful lot of them) who's ever been diagnosed with cancer?

Sam ,

There's been a few of them, according to this article:
https://www.cheatsheet.com/health-fitness/how-many-members-of-the-royal-family-have-had-cancer.html/

John Deehan ,

Elizabeth's father died of lung cancer.

Robbobbobin ,

As an aside, can anyone name me a single member of the UK royal family (and there's an awful lot of them) who's ever been diagnosed with cancer?

There seem to be quite a lot of people who think the UK Royal Family are a cancer. Does that count?

Einstein ,

Public health panics are ideal for enforcing more controls on an already fearful and submissive public.
The Wuhan "corona" (crown) virus is about as deadly as 'flu, which we weather without note every year.
But health bureaucrats have noted how much "terror" panics can swell the budgets of the military and police. "Epidemics" of "dangerous" bugs offer the ideal opportunity for the builders of public health empires to follow suit.

Willem ,

3 per cent mortality for a transmittable disease, like corana virus (or common cold) is very high. Earth has 7.5 billion inhabitants, so if all of them get infected, and 3% die, then 225 million people will die from corona virus.

But then the numbers are, as usual, probably at least partially bogus:

the nominator: 26 deaths are probably not all caused by corona virus, but only correlated with corona virus. My guess (ad good as anyone's guess) is that of these 26 at most 10 died.

The denominator: who let's himself get tested for the common cold (corona virus). Probably only the most severe cases. My guess, this virus is for 95% very mild for which no doctor is visited, and then of the 5% who visit the doctor with common cold symptoms at most 1% is tested positive for corona, which are the 800 cases. Which makes the denominator not 800, but 800:0,01:0,05:0,95=a very large number.

Now if you divide 10 over a very number, your death rate will be close to 0, similar as the death rate is due to normal common cold.

Binra ,

The 'medical' sector has long been empowered by those who want their fears salved rather than question the narratives that are fed and used to gain power or possession of others.

However, as with switching to 'non-violence' – a habitual identification isn't something to be turned on or off when a crisis comes – but as a way of living.

Weaponised and marketised science gravitated to germ theory rather than the terrain theory of pleomorphism (of biota).
Closed system thinking posits external 'evils' and 'avengers' for hidden sins and secret fears, projecting 'cause' OUT THERE and diverting (sacrificing) energy and identity to defence such that the guardians become guards that lock into fear, frailty and dependency as the condition for NEEDING Powers that demand sacrifice of freedom and joy in life for a perpetual threat-managed existence.

Mainstream science is generally the narrative that suits the Establishment – not just of the 'powers of the day' – but the collective fear seeking protection and reassurance.

Toxic exposures generate the terrain for a need to clear out or neutralise the toxic environment – this results in 'inflammations and infections' which of course CAN be fatal or result in degradation of health and cognition. Our 'Rockefeller medicine' has focused on interventions that suppress or block symptoms to ward the idea of losing the realm and skills of relational nursing and clinical doctoring to pharma-technicians – who interpret most anything as a basis to intensify or increase the level and degree of interventions.

Fear is contagious – and hidden or masked fears are simply secretly active.

Immunity is not a matter of 'antibodies' but firstly of cellular health and function.
This principle can be transferred to our social political culture.

Hugo ,

The Chinese government faced a lot of international criticism for its perceived tardiness in handling the 2003 SARS crisis. The heavy-handedness at locking down Wuhan might be to do with not wishing to face international criticism again.

[Jan 24, 2020] Bloomberg's Plan for Addressing Economic Inequality: not a wealth tax by Linda Beale

Jan 23, 2020 | angrybearblog.com
A bit ago (Jan 8, 2020), the New York Times described Michael Bloomberg's plan 1 for addressing the income and wealth inequality in the United States that has been a constant topic of discussion by Democratic candidates. Briefly, as with the robber barons of Teddy Roosevelt's age, the wealth of the global commerce titans and particularly the private equity fund buyers and sellers of companies (and layers off of employees) has exploded over the last four decades in the US, beginning in earnest with Ronald Reagan's presidency. Most of the benefits of productivity gains have gone to a very few people at the top, and the bottom 50% of the wealth distribution actually owns a smaller share of the nation's wealth than 40 years ago. The top 1% have gained enormously, and the top 0.5% have been even more enriched. We have ultra multibillionaires like Jeff Bezos who can pay $9 billion to his wife in a divorce settlement and still be the wealthiest man in the world with more than $130 billion in net worth. He earns about $78.5 billion a year (counting value of his Amazon shares) or more than $6.5 billion a month 2 and thus exemplifies this new "gilded age" of ultrawealthy tycoons. This exists at the same time that the Trump administration proposes work requirements that will eliminate food stamp aid for 700,000 of hungry Americans and, with other initiatives, will take food stamps from 3.7 million beneficiaries who simply cannot get work that pays well enough to fund a sustainable lifestyle for themselves and their families. 3 This will "save" the U.S. about $5.5 billion over five years–less than Bezos 'earns' in a month. This disparity–$5.5 billion to feed 3.5 million hungry Americans versus provide a month's additional wealth for a person already wallowing in wealth like Jeff Bezos–is why it is clear that the US needs to figure out how to respond to the inequality crisis in order to protect American democracy and ensure Americans have a decent standard of living.

Bloomberg's plan seems to be a moderate stance like Obama and Biden that attempts to focus on factors other than the wealth gap and the accompanying power gap that wealth provides. As the NY Times reports, he "frames the economic divide primarily in regional terms–and not along rich-versus-everyone-else class lines." 1 The Times article notes that his plan is not unlike the charge Obama gave to Joe Biden for the Middle Class Task Force. 1\

Bloomberg's proposals for addressing the problem are similarly centered on things long discussed and tried that are difficult to do at a large enough scale to make any inroads into the inequality problem or the power gap problem. He is most definitely not proposing a wealth tax. His proposals include a focus on education and skills training, infrastructure projects, and entrepreneurial training centers. Although the GI Bill was a significant part of the post-WWII economic boom because it allowed vast numbers of returning veterans to get a college education, Bloomberg seems to be thinking more of apprenticeships and community colleges (training for a job) rather than university (training for a career and an approach to learning throughout life). The Times notes his interest in raising the minimum wage to $15 an hour, expanding the Earned Income Tax Credit, and encouraging unions while disallowing noncompetes for low- and middle-income jobs.

All those are minimal steps that any progressive candidate should take, but while they may have marginal impact on middle class mobility, they will not do much at all to ease the income and wealth gap that has been caused by technology, globalization, and financialization of the economy together that has measured success almost solely from stock market numbers and thus allowed corporate and private equity tycoons to garner the major gains in productivity over decades while paying their workers too little (or moving offshore to pay even less), combined with a tax system that privileges wealth, including, among a host of others, extremely favorable corporate tax provisions after the 2017 tax legislation, ridiculously low maximum rates on ordinary income, carried interest provision, section 1031 exchanges, section 1202 exclusion for gains on original issue small business stock, capital gains preference, and an absurdly low flat estate tax above a too-high exemption amount with a step-up in basis for heirs.

Bloomberg is a billionaire who is at least aware that the inequality in this country is problematic and needs to be addressed. But like most of the "have-so-much" class, he shows little interest in what is truly required–a shift in the direction of redistribution to balance the distorted seesaw of billionaires getting all the height and the rest sitting at the bottom. FDR's New Deal is said to have worked because the robber barons were scared that the proletariat would rise up in support of communism–the so-called 'red scare' behind the success of social security enactment. There may not be a red scare now (though the Trump campaigners try to paint democratic socialist programs as communism), but there is a real likelihood that the contrast–and possibly real class warfare– between the squalor and despair of poor families who work hard but cannot fend for themselves and rich kids with silver spoons that only grow bigger and bigger may eventually threaten the global nation of the plutocrats. 4

1 Jim Tankersley, Michael Bloomberg's Jobs Plan is Focused on Place over Class , New York Times (Jan 8, 2020).

2 Hillary Hoffower, We did the math to calculate how much money Jeff Bezos makes in a year, month, week, day, hour, minute, and second , BusinessInsider.com (Jan 9, 2020).

3 Phil McCausland, T rump administration proposals could cause millions to lose food stamps , NBC News (Nov. 30, 2019) (discussing proposed changes to SNAP program that would impose stricter work requirements, cap deductions for utility allowances and 'reform' the way states automatically enroll families when they receive other aid). See also

4. See, e.g., Chrystia Freeland, Plutocrats: The Rise of the New Global Super-Rich (2012) (described in The Guardian book review as "a necessary and at times depressing book about the staggeringly wealthy"). Freeland is neither Marxist nor socialist, and as I am reading the book, not evenappropriately skeptical of the amount of merit behind the plutocrats' self-claimed meritocracy.

  1. pgl , January 23, 2020 7:40 am

    Bloomberg was mayor of NYC for 12 years. During that period he opposed raising taxes on the rich. He also showed what he thought about the various classes by making sure that upper Manhattan (where his fellow billionaires often live) got taken care of but the other boroughs (where the working class often live) received scant attention or real resources. OK – he was a better mayor than RUDY G. but that is a very low bar.

[Jan 23, 2020] US industrial production has fallen

Jan 23, 2020 | www.moonofalabama.org

Duncan Idaho , Jan 24 2020 0:49 utc | 138

US industrial production has fallen from 5.4% growth in September 2018 to minus-1.01% in December. "Production has been negative for the last four months."

[Jan 22, 2020] Journalism as the last escape of mathematically illiterates

Jan 22, 2020 | www.moonofalabama.org

Walter , Jan 22 2020 12:30 utc | 95

@ Russ | Jan 22 2020 8:33 utc | 86 (about the gas cylinder(s).

Any bright high-school kid who's been through the math curriculum and has some calculus can tell you, give you, a range of terminal velocities in air at that elevation. You have to assume that the thing fell in the "best" attitude, and also the "worst" attitude - a matter of aerodynamic drag. Obviously there's a terminal velocity - somewhere about 200 feet per second. There's a minimum altitude above which it doesn't fall any faster because of drag...and it has a krappy drag coefficient. You have to work with the numbers to get a fine understanding...but it's the sort of question you'd see in a university engineering exam.

The mass is assumed to be something like 100 pounds. Do the math.

Then there's the question of concrete quality...it's highly heterogeneous..but you can assume it's top quality, and estimate the rebar density and thickness from the pretty pictures.

And you can assume zero projectile deformation (not even straps torn off!!?) and the hole's not big enough.

The story's bull.

William Gruff , Jan 22 2020 13:48 utc | 98

somebody @96: "But Western main stream media does not report on it."

Of course not. The western corporate mass media does not have among their workforce "Any bright high-school kid who's been through the math curriculum and has some calculus..." that Walter @95 points out as being a prerequisite to see how bogus is the narrative they are tasked with amplifying. The workforce chose to major in Journalism specifically because they had difficulties with basic arithmetic, with such heartless and unyielding topics as addition and subtraction being forever beyond them in the absence of a calculator.

Many think I exaggerate or am joking, but this is literal truth. These individuals of which the corporate mass media are composed get their conception of physics from crappy syfy movies in which spaceship blasters make "Pew-pew!!" noises in the vacuum of space. If it is necessary for the plot that a flimsy canister is able to punch through steel rebar reinforced concrete with barely a scratch, then they are fine with it. If these new age journalists' "contact" in Langley (what we know to be their "handler" or "operator" ) says it is believable, they won't pause for an instant to question.

After all, earnest delusion and ignorance serves the Mockingbird mass media's handlers in the CIA far better than does cynical and deliberate deception, though that last does have a sizable role to play as well. Deliberate deception is difficult and requires some skill, while any American can do stupidity with the greatest of ease.

[Jan 19, 2020] Not Just Hunter Widespread Biden Family Profiteering Exposed

Highly recommended!
Notable quotes:
"... Of course, Biden in 2019 said "I never talked with my son or my brother or anyone else -- even distant family -- about their business interests. Period." ..."
"... James Biden : Joe's younger brother James has been deeply involved in the lawmaker's rise since the early days - serving as the finance chair of his 1972 Senate campaign. And when Joe became VP, James was a frequent guest at the White House - scoring invites to important state functions which often "dovetailed with his overseas business dealings," writes Schweizer. ..."
"... According to Fox Business 's Charlie Gasparino in 2012, HillStone's Iraq project was expected to "generate $1.5 billion in revenues over the next three years," more than tripling their revenue. According to the report, James Biden split roughly $735 million with a group of minority partners . ..."
"... David Richter - the son of HillStone's parent company's founder - allegedly told investors at a private meeting; it really helps to have "the brother of the vice president as a partner." ..."
Jan 19, 2020 | www.zerohedge.com

Clinton Cash author Peter Schweizer is out with a new book, " Profiles in Corruption: Abuse of Power by America's Progressive Elite," in which he reveals that five members of the Biden family, including Hunter, got rich using former Vice President Joe Biden's "largesse, favorable access and powerful position."

Frank Biden, Vice President Joe Biden, & Mindy Ward

While we know of Hunter's profitable exploits in Ukraine and China - largely in part thanks to Schweizer, Joe's brothers James and Frank, his sister Valerie, and his son-in-law Howard all used the former VP's status to enrich themselves.

Of course, Biden in 2019 said "I never talked with my son or my brother or anyone else -- even distant family -- about their business interests. Period."

As Schweizer puts writes in the New York Post ; "we shall see."

James Biden : Joe's younger brother James has been deeply involved in the lawmaker's rise since the early days - serving as the finance chair of his 1972 Senate campaign. And when Joe became VP, James was a frequent guest at the White House - scoring invites to important state functions which often "dovetailed with his overseas business dealings," writes Schweizer.

Consider the case of HillStone International , a subsidiary of the huge construction management firm, Hill International. The president of HillStone International was Kevin Justice, who grew up in Delaware and was a longtime Biden family friend. On November 4, 2010, according to White House visitors' logs, Justice visited the White House and met with Biden adviser Michele Smith in the Office of the Vice President .

Less than three weeks later, HillStone announced that James Biden would be joining the firm as an executive vice president . James appeared to have little or no background in housing construction, but that did not seem to matter to HillStone. His bio on the company's website noted his "40 years of experience dealing with principals in business, political, legal and financial circles across the nation and internationally "

James Biden was joining HillStone just as the firm was starting negotiations to win a massive contract in war-torn Iraq. Six months later, the firm announced a contract to build 100,000 homes. It was part of a $35 billion, 500,000-unit project deal won by TRAC Development , a South Korean company. HillStone also received a $22 million U.S. federal government contract to manage a construction project for the State Department. - Peter Schweizer, via NY Post

According to Fox Business 's Charlie Gasparino in 2012, HillStone's Iraq project was expected to "generate $1.5 billion in revenues over the next three years," more than tripling their revenue. According to the report, James Biden split roughly $735 million with a group of minority partners .

David Richter - the son of HillStone's parent company's founder - allegedly told investors at a private meeting; it really helps to have "the brother of the vice president as a partner."

Unfortunately for James, HillStone had to back out of the major contract in 2013 over a series of problems, including a lack of experience - but the company maintained "significant contract work in the embattled country" of Iraq, including a six-year contract with the US Army Corps of Engineers.

In the ensuing years, James Biden profited off of Hill's lucrative contracts for dozens of projects in the US, Puerto Rico, Mozambique and elsewhere.

Frank Biden , another one of Joe's brothers (who said the Pennsylvania Bidens voted for Trump over Hillary), profited handsomely on real estate, casinos, and solar power projects after Joe was picked as Obma's point man in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Months after Joe visited Costa Rica, Frank partnered with developer Craig Williamson and the Guanacaste Country Club on a deal which appears to be ongoing.

In real terms, Frank's dream was to build in the jungles of Costa Rica thousands of homes, a world-class golf course, casinos, and an anti-aging center. The Costa Rican government was eager to cooperate with the vice president's brother.

As it happened, Joe Biden had been asked by President Obama to act as the Administration's point man in Latin America and the Caribbean .

Frank's vision for a country club in Costa Rica received support from the highest levels of the Costa Rican government -- despite his lack of experience in building such developments. He met with the Costa Rican ministers of education and energy and environment, as well as the president of the country. - NY Post

And in 2016, the Costa Rican Ministry of Public Education inked a deal with Frank's Company, Sun Fund Americas to install solar power facilities across the country - a project the Obama administration's OPIC authorized $6.5 million in taxpayer funds to support.

This went hand-in-hand with a solar initiative Joe Biden announced two years earlier, in which "American taxpayer dollars were dedicated to facilitating deals that matched U.S. government financing with local energy projects in Caribbean countries, including Jamaica," known as the Caribbean Energy Security Initiative (CESI).

Frank Biden's Sun Fund Americas announced later that it had signed a power purchase agreement (PPA) to build a 20-megawatt solar facility in Jamaica.

Valerie Biden-Owens , Joe's sister, has run all of her brother's Senate campaigns - as well as his 1988 and 2008 presidential runs.

She was also a senior partner in political messaging firm Joe Slade White & Company , where she and Slade White were listed as the only two executives at the time.

According to Schweizer, " The firm received large fees from the Biden campaigns that Valerie was running . Two and a half million dollars in consulting fees flowed to her firm from Citizens for Biden and Biden For President Inc. during the 2008 presidential bid alone."

Dr. Howard Krein - Joe Biden's son-in-law, is the chief medical officer of StartUp Health - a medical investment consultancy that was barely up and running when, in June 2011, two of the company's execs met with Joe Biden and former President Obama in the Oval Office .

The next day, the company was included in a prestigious health care tech conference run by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) - while StartUp Health executives became regular White House visitors between 2011 and 2015 .

StartUp Health offers to provide new companies technical and relationship advice in exchange for a stake in the business. Demonstrating and highlighting the fact that you can score a meeting with the president of the United States certainly helps prove a strategic company asset: high-level contacts. - NY Post

Speaking of his homie hookup, Krein described how his company gained access to the highest levels of power in D.C.:

"I happened to be talking to my father-in-law that day and I mentioned Steve and Unity were down there [in Washington, D.C.]," recalled Howard Krein. "He knew about StartUp Health and was a big fan of it. He asked for Steve's number and said, 'I have to get them up here to talk with Barack.' The Secret Service came and got Steve and Unity and brought them to the Oval Office."

And then, of course, there's Hunter Biden - who was paid millions of dollars to sit on the board of Ukrainian energy giant Burisma while his father was Obama's point man in the country.

But it goes far beyond that for the young crack enthusiast.

With the election of his father as vice president, Hunter Biden launched businesses fused to his father's power that led him to lucrative deals with a rogue's gallery of governments and oligarchs around the world . Sometimes he would hitch a prominent ride with his father aboard Air Force Two to visit a country where he was courting business. Other times, the deals would be done more discreetly. Always they involved foreign entities that appeared to be seeking something from his father.

There was, for example, Hunter's involvement with an entity called Burnham Financial Group , where his business partner Devon Archer -- who'd been at Yale with Hunter -- sat on the board of directors. Burnham became the vehicle for a number of murky deals abroad, involving connected oligarchs in Kazakhstan and state-owned businesses in China.

But one of the most troubling Burnham ventures was here in the United States, in which Burnham became the center of a federal investigation involving a $60 million fraud scheme against one of the poorest Indian tribes in America , the Oglala Sioux.

Devon Archer was arrested in New York in May 2016 and charged with "orchestrating a scheme to defraud investors and a Native American tribal entity of tens of millions of dollars." Other victims of the fraud included several public and union pension plans. Although Hunter Biden was not charged in the case, his fingerprints were all over Burnham . The "legitimacy" that his name and political status as the vice president's son lent to the plan was brought up repeatedly in the trial. - NY Post

Read the rest of the report here .

[Jan 19, 2020] Stand up for what you believe, even if you are standing alone.

Jan 19, 2020 | jessescrossroadscafe.blogspot.com


"...we had come to the stage where for our people what was needed was a real democracy; and of all forms of tyranny the least attractive and the most vulgar is the tyranny of mere wealth, the tyranny of a plutocracy."

Theodore Roosevelt, Autobiography

"Stand up for what you believe, even if you are standing alone."

Sophie Scholl

[Jan 19, 2020] The neoliberal hopes -- and that is the mark of him, that he can have his cake and eat it too

Jan 19, 2020 | jessescrossroadscafe.blogspot.com

"In sorrow we must go, but not in despair. Behold! we are not bound for ever to the circles of the world, and beyond them is more than memory."

J.R.R. Tolkien

"We were promised sufferings. They were part of the program. We were even told, 'Blessed are they that mourn,' and I accept it. I've got nothing that I hadn't bargained for. Of course it is different when the thing happens to oneself, not to others, and in reality, not imagination."

C.S. Lewis

"If the devil tells you something is too fearful to look at, look at it. If he says something is too terrible to hear, hear it. If you think some truth unbearable, bear it."

G.K. Chesterton

"The barbarian hopes -- and that is the mark of him, that he can have his cake and eat it too. He will consume what civilization has slowly produced after generations of selection and effort, but he will not be at pains to replace such goods, nor indeed has he a comprehension of the virtue that has brought them into being.

We sit by and watch the barbarian. We tolerate him in the long stretches of peace, we are not afraid. We are tickled by his irreverence; his comic inversion of our old certitudes; we laugh. But as we laugh we are watched by large and awful faces from beyond, and on these faces there are no smiles."

Hilaire Belloc

"In an ever-changing, incomprehensible world the masses had reached the point where they would, at the same time, believe everything and nothing, think that everything was possible and that nothing was true. The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated communist, but people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists."

Hannah Arendt

[Jan 19, 2020] The anti-China conservative faction which Trump represents is screwing up the Pax Americana and petrodollar recycling into Treasury Bonds, by destroying the monetary scam they set up to control the world

Notable quotes:
"... The "movement conservatives" leader was Barry Goldwater who Trump's dad was a big supporter of, and Trump was raised in and among AND represents that faction of elite power. ..."
"... The LIEO or Rules Based Order is based on being closely allied with European elites against Russia to contain the Middle East and Central Asia (Iran and Afghanistan) based on Zbigniew Brzezinski's Grand Chessboard theory. ..."
"... The 1950's triangle of power was superseded by the oligarch's counter revolution that led to supranational trade institutions. Democracies were relegated to a secondary status and run by technocrats for the benefit of oligarchs until Donald Trump. He is a nationalist plutocrat; admittedly a lower level one, a NY casino owner who went bankrupt. Mike Bloomberg represents the other side, a globalist billionaire. Elizabeth Warren is a top level technocrat but no politician. ..."
"... The endless wars are fought to make a profit for the plutocracy and destabilize nations to make foreign corporate exploitation possible. That was why Hunter Biden was in Ukraine. The conflicts are not meant to be won. ..."
"... He makes stupid mistakes. Through the barrage of propaganda, reports of shell shocked troops, destroyed buildings and 11 concussion causalities from Iran's missile attack made it into the news. The military must be pissed. The aura of invincibility is gone. ..."
"... Donald Trump should be removed by the 25th amendment before he mistakenly triggers the Apocalypse. Except the 1% politician VP, Mike Pence, believes that the End of Time is God's Will and necessary for his Ascension. ..."
"... The power triangle theory is less in line with the facts than a simple duality: Wall Street & the MIC, you have to advance interests of both or you're out. ..."
"... Second, the 'meeting in the Tank' sounds like complete b.s. designed to sell books ..."
"... And the 'rules-based international order' rings very false as something that would be said with a straight face by real MIC insiders, which those generals are. ..."
"... Not only sick of wars, his mobster approach to foreign policy and allies is an embarrassment to RINO and Independents. ..."
"... Humanity is in a civilization war about public/private finance being fought by proxies and character actors like Trump. Maybe after this war is over, and if we survive, we can all communicate about the social contract directly instead of through proxy fronts. Do you want to live in a sharing/caring world or a selfish/competitive one?....socialism or barbarism? ..."
Jan 19, 2020 | www.moonofalabama.org

Kali , Jan 17 2020 19:26 utc | 7

That Power Elite theory which was written in the 50s by C.W. Mills is incomplete for today because in the 60s there was a split among the power elite between the new "movement conservatives" and the old eastern bank establishment. The conservatives were more focused on the pacific region and containing China, and the liberal establishment were more focused on Europe and containing Russia.

The "movement conservatives" leader was Barry Goldwater who Trump's dad was a big supporter of, and Trump was raised in and among AND represents that faction of elite power. In fact he is the 1st president from that faction of the elites to hold the oval office, many people thought Reagan was, but he was brought under the control of George Bush and the liberal elites after taking office after he was injured by a Bush related person. The different agendas of the the two factions are out in the open today with one being focused on anti-Russia and the other being focused on anti-China. It has been like that since the 1960s.

The anti-China conservative faction which Trump represents (and which unleashed the VietNam War) is screwing up the "rules based order" aka "Liberal International Economic Order" aka Pax Americana which was set up after WWII at Bretton Woods and then altered in the 1970s with the creation of the petrodollar and petrodollar recycling into Treasury Bonds, by destroying the monetary scam they set up to control the world

It needed the cooperation of the elites of Europe and elsewhere, which Trump and his faction doesn't care about -- they only care about short term profits on Wall St.

The LIEO or Rules Based Order is based on being closely allied with European elites against Russia to contain the Middle East and Central Asia (Iran and Afghanistan) based on Zbigniew Brzezinski's Grand Chessboard theory. China trade is important for them, Russia is their main enemy. ( War of the Worlds: The New Class ). Trump and his movement conservative faction is ruining their world order for their own short term gain on Wall St.


VietnamVet , Jan 17 2020 22:34 utc | 44
The 1950's triangle of power was superseded by the oligarch's counter revolution that led to supranational trade institutions. Democracies were relegated to a secondary status and run by technocrats for the benefit of oligarchs until Donald Trump. He is a nationalist plutocrat; admittedly a lower level one, a NY casino owner who went bankrupt. Mike Bloomberg represents the other side, a globalist billionaire. Elizabeth Warren is a top level technocrat but no politician.

The endless wars are fought to make a profit for the plutocracy and destabilize nations to make foreign corporate exploitation possible. That was why Hunter Biden was in Ukraine. The conflicts are not meant to be won.

Donald Trump is way for over his head and getting old. His competent staff are in jail or fired. Apparently no one told him about the thousands of ballistic missiles that can destroy the Gulf States' oil facilities at will and make the buildup for the invasion of Iran impossible. He makes stupid mistakes. Through the barrage of propaganda, reports of shell shocked troops, destroyed buildings and 11 concussion causalities from Iran's missile attack made it into the news. The military must be pissed. The aura of invincibility is gone.

Donald Trump should be removed by the 25th amendment before he mistakenly triggers the Apocalypse. Except the 1% politician VP, Mike Pence, believes that the End of Time is God's Will and necessary for his Ascension.

fairleft , Jan 18 2020 1:21 utc | 81
The power triangle theory is less in line with the facts than a simple duality: Wall Street & the MIC, you have to advance interests of both or you're out.

Second, the 'meeting in the Tank' sounds like complete b.s. designed to sell books, with an obvious sales strategy, as b said, of pleasuring both the pro/anti Trump sides of the book-buying bourgeoisie.

And the 'rules-based international order' rings very false as something that would be said with a straight face by real MIC insiders, which those generals are.

Finally, whether Trump ridiculed the generals or not, that's a sideshow to entertain the rubes. Trump's always been on side with the big picture Neocon approach essential to the MIC. Their global dominance or chaos approach is essential to keeping military budgets gigantic until 'forever'. True that Trump whined about endless wars as a 2016 campaign strategy, but he was either b.s.-ing or at the time didn't get that they are part of the overall Neocon approach he backs.

Passer by , Jan 17 2020 22:04 utc | 35

Not a very good analysis by b because this does not explain why 90 % of US corporate media is hostile to Trump. This does not happen without significant elite support.

That Trump is backed by the military faction is something i have been saying often. But there are forces within the government faction that dislike him, for example the CIA.

As for the corporate faction, it is not true that free money made them supportive of Trump. Rather the faction is divided - between the globalist corporate faction, relying on globalisation, including most tech companies, and US nationalist faction, such as local US businesses, big oil, shale gas, etc.

Another point - jews have large influence within the US, and 80 % voted against Trump regardless of his Israeli support. They again voted 80 % Dem in 2018. Having 80 % of US jews against you means encountering significant resistance.

Demographically speaking, most women, jews, muslims, latinos, asians, afroamericans, lgbt people, young people, etc. are strongly against him so i think that he will lose. Unless for some reason they do not vote.

Even if he somehow wins again, this will lead to civil war like situation and extreme polarisation in the US.

A P , Jan 17 2020 19:33 utc | 9

The US military, the various factions within the Deep State, political and corporate cabals has the attitude of a spoiled 3-year-old: If I can't have it, I'll break it so it is of little use to others.

Unfortunately, breaking other countries is just fine for the MIC... arms sales all around and chaos to impede non-military commerce with other major power centers like Russia or China.

Trump is the product of a dysfunctional family, a "greed is good" trust-fund social circle and a sociopathic US bully/gun culture.

The fact "bone spurs" Trump weaseled out of the draft will also not play well with the generals, let alone the grunts who suffer most from endless POTUS idiocy (not limited to Trump, see Prince Bush/Bandar the 2nd)

All the more proof that most Western "democracies" would be better served with a lottery to choose their Congressional and POTUS chair-warmers. Joe Sixpack could do a better job. A 200-lb sack of flour would do better than any POTUS since Kennedy.

Walter , Jan 17 2020 23:25 utc | 56

@ wagelaborer | Jan 17 2020 19:04 utc | 3

your: "Trump can't start a war without ruling class backing any more than he can end the wars if the rulers veto it."

May be, I think is, true in one sense. But Trump is far from the sole agent capable of starting a war. War, as opposed to simple murder, involve 2 or more parties. Whatever the intentions, the recent murders by drone in Baghdad hav,e it seems, brought Iran to consider war exists now...and they have a nifty MAGA policy. On Press TV today they hosted an expert who called for the execution of several exceptional American leaders...sounds like war to me.

(Make America Go Away)

The system is so screwy and peopled by such uneducated and delusional people that it's quite simple that they would do some stupid that that caused a war. Looks like war to me. I await the horrors.

Decaying empires usually start wars that bring about their rapid ruin. Does it matter how they do this?

............

The thesis of the triangle of elite factions is fascinating.

Walter recalls that JFK got the reports from Vietnam that said we were winning, while at the same time Johnson got the true story. And also what happened then with the "correction" of 1963 (their words) and the immediate change of war policy. Can't help an old guy from remembering old folly. And noting that history repeats as farce.

The Iran affair is liable to coordinate with NATO. Lavrov spoke to the NATO preparations today @ TASS...

Some say Trumpie screwed up the schedule, which goes hot in April as a showdown with the Roooskies. I take that with a grain of salt. But I think the sources I've seen might be right. They say that if Barbarossa had not been delayed, the nazis woulda won in Russia. Screwups can be very important.

I can't see any way the US won't use atomic bangers. But maybe...

Likklemore , Jan 17 2020 21:50 utc | 29

@ wagelaborer 3

Good points. I endorse. However the USD have been weaponized, is being sidelined and will be shunned U.S. dollar: Russia, China, EU are motivated to shift from

@ juiliana 22

I posted an article by Shedlock essentially saying all it will take is 3 states to flip and Trump loses: Trump will be easily defeated in 2020 perhaps by a landslide.

Not only sick of wars, his mobster approach to foreign policy and allies is an embarrassment to RINO and Independents.

psychohistorian , Jan 17 2020 19:52 utc | 11

I agree with wagelaborer in comment #3 and worth a repeat of most of it

"Trump can't start a war without ruling class backing any more than he can end the wars if the rulers veto it.

US foreign policy is not run by White House puppets.

The US trash-talked Saddam Hussein and starved Iraqis for 14 years, but didn't actually invade until he started trading oil in Euros.

The US trash-talked Ghaddafi for decades, and even launched missiles which killed his child in the 80s, but didn't destroy Libya until Ghaddafi decided to sell oil in dinars.

The US has trash-talked and sanctioned Iran for decades, but it was the threat of Iran and Saudi Arabia making peace that pushed them to assassinate General Soleimani, as he arrived at the airport on that diplomatic mission.

If Iran and Saudi Arabia make peace, and the Saudis drop the petro-dollar, the US Empire crumbles. It doesn't matter at all who is in the White House at the time, the Empire will never allow that."

Humanity is in a civilization war about public/private finance being fought by proxies and character actors like Trump. Maybe after this war is over, and if we survive, we can all communicate about the social contract directly instead of through proxy fronts. Do you want to live in a sharing/caring world or a selfish/competitive one?....socialism or barbarism?

[Jan 19, 2020] At the lower level, there's the division of the American people about how the spoils that come from the imperial conquests should be better shared

Jan 19, 2020 | www.moonofalabama.org

vk , Jan 18 2020 2:37 utc | 90

I think the "triangle of power" theory walks towards the truth, but is not the truth.

For starters, the USA is a very large and complex society. There are a lot of classes and a lot of groups which clash and prop up each other all the time. The only consensus is that it is and must remain a capitalist society, i.e. that capitalism must be preserved at any cost.

That said, I see many interests involved, but a hierarchy, in layered form. Here's my opinion on the state of the art of the USA right now:

1) at the highest level, there's the division between the most powerful members of the capitalist class between what should be the American foreign policy strategy for the rest of this century. It is divided between two different ideologies: russophobes (i.e. the "establishment") and the believers of the "clash of civilizations" (i.e. the far-right, sinophobes). The only thing that unites both groups is the conviction Eurasia should remain divided, i.e. that Russia and China should not consolidate their newborn alliance. If that alliance consolidates a century from now, then this contradiction will disappear, but America's new enemy will be stronger than ever - possibly more powerful than the USA.

2) at the lower level, there's the division of the American people about how the spoils that come from the imperial conquests should be better shared. This division manifests itself in the battle between social-democracy and fascism. Neoliberalism is basically a rotten corpse after 2008, but it is important to state it is not an ideology per se, but a political doctrine, from which both American social-democracy and American fascism lend some aspects.

3) at the vestigial level, you have many micro battles which shock with each other. For example, the good part of the American middle class imploded Elizabeth Warren's support for universal healthcare because they wanted to keep their class distinction as the class which has access to healthcare through expensive health insurances (which are often directly linked to distinct jobs they probably have) - but they still will vote Democrat, and probably will support Warren as long as she's viable. In the far-right camp, there are those who want to emphasize the fight against China must happen because China represents modern socialism, while another part wants to fight China for the simple fact they want some jobs back. In the deep state, there's the usual Pentagon vs CIA clash of philosophies about how to better operate overseas. In the lobby industry, each one is fending for themselves.

In conclusion, my take is all of these conflicts have one ultimate cause: the exhaustion of the American imperial system installed in 1945 . Capitalism doesn't know national barriers; in 1945, the USA was both the industrial and financial superpower, but capital must spread and expand or it dies. The Marshall Plan soon begun and, in two decades, Germany and Japan - both spawns of the American post-war doctrine - directly threatened the USA as the industrial superpower. It still managed to fend off these two nations with the Plaza Accord (1985), but at a huge cost: outsourcing its own industrial capacity to China. In 2011, China definitely overcame the USA and now holds the belt of the industrial superpower. It is now trying to be also the financial superpower, with the "opening up" reforms.

This generated a structural contradiction: the loss of the industrial superpower title left the USA only with the financial superpower title. But the financial superpower title can only be maintained, in a nation-State architecture, with increased submission of the rest of the world - naturally, through violent means and financial sanctions.

However, that was not the way the USA was able to build its overwhelming post-war alliance: it did so with nation building , i.e. the proverbial "carrot", the massive investments in infrastructure and better living standards for Western Europe, Japan, Asian Tigers and Australia. But without the industrial superpower title, the USA cannot maintain its "alliance" (i.e. the empire), which reinforces its condition as the financial superpower - which, in turn, increases its necessity to maintain the alliance (empire) which, in turn, weakens more and more said alliance, which, in turn, increases even more its necessity to maintain said alliance, and so on, in a downward spiral movement.

The result of this dialectical contradiction is that the USA will, over time, resort to ever more violent methods to keep the corners of its empire whole, which will drive it ever closer to an epic war against its ultimate enemy: socialism (China/Eurasia).


Duncan Idaho , Jan 18 2020 2:41 utc | 91

Well-----

"And many of them may actually be as mind-blowingly stupid as he is as well and they don't see what a problem it is to have such an arrogant moron running the world's only superpower. If there's one thing right-wingers take as an article of faith it's that expertise is nothing but a scam and the guy at the end of the bar can run the world better than the pointy-headed elites. They got what they wanted."

Trump might be appropriate. The survivors, if any, will have more resources, as the ditch he is heading into.
A slow death by Dims would be worse.

Patroklos , Jan 18 2020 4:52 utc | 100
@ vk 90

Your analysis nicely maps onto the Braudelian model of the phases of capitalism, especially as articulated in the chapter by Arrighi and Moore in Phases of Capitalist Development . They argue that the historical signal that the US had begun to lose its hegemony in commodity production (M-C-M') was the Nixon shock/Oil Shock (1970-73). They further argue that the inevitable shift to financial hegemony (M-M'), which has occurred in every other phase (Genovese, Dutch, British), has taken place more quickly than the one before it. As a result, they predicted (in 2001) very broadly that the terminal point of this financial (self-)vampirism -- when the system reaches a point of complete contradiction -- would take place around 2020. One key difference they note between the US global regime with all prior hegemonic orders is the reach and power of the military. The British Empire was able to deploy its navy to support its hegemony only up to a point -- and then became a paper tiger overnight. But the US military has not been deployed to any extent comparable to 1941-45. If it saw a real existential threat to dollar hegemony their military capacity would postpone any collapse indefinitely -- and throw the world into utter chaos.

My question to you and all is this: where are we in the timeline between their loss of industrial hegemony and the real crisis of their financial hegemony? Is this the decade of hegemonic challenge and change -- and therefore war? And to what extent will Iran be the trigger? Or will it be another GFC and de-dollarization?

[Jan 19, 2020] Inequality in the USA has reached an 100-year record high

Jan 19, 2020 | www.moonofalabama.org

vk , Jan 18 2020 13:29 utc | 135

@ Posted by: V | Jan 18 2020 9:49 utc | 118

Inequality in the USA has reached an 100-year record high:

It's not the 1% anymore but the 0.1%!

The top 0.1% of US wealth holders now have as much wealth (property, financial assets) as the bottom 90% for the first time since the 'roaring 20s'.

It's not the 1% anymore but the 0.1%!

[Jan 19, 2020] Pompeo idea of deterence means "deterrence to protect [the financial and energy hegemony of] America".

Notable quotes:
"... Pompeo omitted a crucial part of this sentence: "deterrence to protect [the financial and energy hegemony of] America". ..."
"... a regular part of the MSM/cinema diet masticated by the general public that we have completely forgotten that the basic function of the armed forces is the pursuit of vested interests through superior violence. ..."
"... No qualms or BS 'deterrence', armies are for taking other people's stuff by force (land-grabs, etc). I would respect Pompeo a whole lot more (but not much more...) if he just once came out and said: "Iran is run by people who don't want us to take their stuff; we want to undermine them and replace them with paid yes-men who will let us take Iran's stuff. We will use violence and armed force to make this happen. ..."
"... But we have no intention of distributing this loot evenly among our citizens. Instead it will be paid as dividends to select shareholders and spent retooling the military for next poor bastards who stand up to us." ..."
Jan 19, 2020 | www.moonofalabama.org

Patroklos , Jan 19 2020 5:40 utc | 84

"...deterrence to protect America."

Pompeo omitted a crucial part of this sentence: "deterrence to protect [the financial and energy hegemony of] America".

While this might be obvious to us, the narrative that US foreign policy is about protecting citizens, values and apple pie from 'bad guys' -- and indeed that the militaries of all Western countries are benign police forces preventing ISIS from burning your old Eagles albums and other violations of 'freedom' -- is such a regular part of the MSM/cinema diet masticated by the general public that we have completely forgotten that the basic function of the armed forces is the pursuit of vested interests through superior violence.

It always seemed strange to me that the post-ww2 cinematic template for war-movies, and by extension the basic plot of all reporting of western military activity in the media, always represented the enemy as evil precisely because they use militaries in an instrumental way (i.e for the purpose they were designed). The Germans, or for that matter the Persians in 300 , or any baddies in war films, seek to extend and protect their interests (real or imagined) by deploying armed forces.

The good guys are always identifiable through this idea of 'deterrence': "hey man, all we want is just to live and let live, but you pushed us so we pushed back." Then one stirs in a little 'preemptive deterrence': you looked like you were going to push so we acted. If we 'accidentally' go too far, it's because there is a deranged C-in-C: Hitler, or Xerxes, or some other naughty boy who can be the fall-guy, scapegoat, etc.

To get serious we need to go back a very long way, to, say, the Iliad , which, like all Greek (and Roman) literature, assumes as a premise (and it's tragedy) that the warrior's basic function is to kill, pillage, rape and occasionally protect others from the same. But mostly take by force .

No qualms or BS 'deterrence', armies are for taking other people's stuff by force (land-grabs, etc). I would respect Pompeo a whole lot more (but not much more...) if he just once came out and said: "Iran is run by people who don't want us to take their stuff; we want to undermine them and replace them with paid yes-men who will let us take Iran's stuff. We will use violence and armed force to make this happen.

But we have no intention of distributing this loot evenly among our citizens. Instead it will be paid as dividends to select shareholders and spent retooling the military for next poor bastards who stand up to us."

Just once.

[Jan 19, 2020] Comparing the American to the former Soviet educational system

Highly recommended!
Notable quotes:
"... There was nothing particularly great in the Soviet educational system. Other than students, who were selected very competitively (often more than 10-30 people for one place in ordinary universities and 100-1000 in elite; yes, 1000 or more per one place was observed in theater specialties). ..."
"... Also, the motivation for study was pretty high: if you fail two times to be admitted to the university, you were drafted into the Red Army. If you were expelled for the bad academic rating (which was, I think, to fail more then two exams in one semester) -- the same call from the Red Army was waiting for you. ..."
"... translation of foreign books in the USSR was the only first-class enterprise (despite outdated equipment). It was first-class both in the selection and the speed of translation. For example, as Knuth mentioned, all three volumes of his books were translated into Russian within a very short interval. ..."
"... But I think students learn as much from each other as from professors, and if the level of the class was extremely high, the results were corresponding. In other words, poor university teachers did not harm them that much, and a lot what they learn, they learn on their own (except fundamental disciplines) -- kind of self-education buried within ;-). ..."
"... Also, rigid soviet system (you have a zero opportunity to select your own set of subjects for a degree) has one important advantage. It schools you to be determined and persisting, no matter what subject you were assigned. To be a real fighter, in some academic or non-academic sense. ..."
"... I think that the main reason for the high quality of Soviet engineers of this period was not the education the got, but the fact that talented people were nowhere to go; there was no "business path." That's why Berezovsky became an academic scholar and even reached the level of the Corresponding Member of the USSR Academy of Science ..."
"... The level of backwardness of computer science education in the 90th in the USSR was staggering. So the fact that there were so many talented programmers in the country, many of whom later found a well-paid job in the Western countries, was mostly due to the level of the talent of those few who managed to get into universities. ..."
"... Many problems with Soviet education persist in Russia. Andrei Martyanov looks at many problems of Russian society via rose glasses. Taking into account the current level of Russophobia, that's a noble stance, and I do not object to his exaggerations. ..."
Dec 09, 2019 | www.unz.com

refl says: Next New Comment December 8, 2019 at 6:30 am GMT 200 Words

@RadicalCenter

The question even to compare the American to the Russian or former Soviet educational system is delusional.

However, the US has understood something that the Russians and any decent people don't get: The people are consumers. They should not be educated beyond the needed to use the most recent applications on their electronic devices. Anything further carries the danger of having them discontent and thus an inroad to the Western entity.

Also, a military is not there to win wars and subsequently have a headache about how to deal with the conquered people. It is about wrecking far away places and providing opportunities to claim invoices from the federal government.

Modern, hybrid warfare is not about applying this or that military means, but about occupying the universities, courts and parliaments of the subdued people – finally occupying their minds. And yes, to do so includes that the weaponry should look cool and provide job opportunities for the hopeless youngsters of that amorphous mass formerly called the nation.

The Russians, Chinese, Iranians will have to stay alert 24/7/365 not to fall into the abyss of depravity that the Great Western Civilisation is offering to them. I am afraid, that the threat is very real that in the end they will be worn down.

likbez says: December 9, 2019 at 5:47 am GMT 800 Words @refl refl,

The question even to compare the American to the Russian or former Soviet educational system is delusional.

Believe me or not, I would prefer the USA system of education (with all its warts) to the Soviet system in the 70-90th without any hesitation. And with the same quality of students, the USA would achive the same or better results.

There was nothing particularly great in the Soviet educational system. Other than students, who were selected very competitively (often more than 10-30 people for one place in ordinary universities and 100-1000 in elite; yes, 1000 or more per one place was observed in theater specialties).

Soviet universities were as poor as church rats, which has one good side effect that they were forced to concentrate more on classic subjects like physics and math, which do not require expensive labs. So students got a solid background in math and physics. But that's about it.

Also, the motivation for study was pretty high: if you fail two times to be admitted to the university, you were drafted into the Red Army. If you were expelled for the bad academic rating (which was, I think, to fail more then two exams in one semester) -- the same call from the Red Army was waiting for you.

As emigrants from the USSR told me, programming courses were simply dismal, and graduates essentially learned the craft of the jobs, not at universities.

Even math books were the second rate in comparison with the USA textbooks of the same period.

They were written by a representative of so-called axiomatic schools and were extremely boring and uninformative. But many good math books were translated (for example, Polia writings) Actually, as I understand, translation of foreign books in the USSR was the only first-class enterprise (despite outdated equipment). It was first-class both in the selection and the speed of translation. For example, as Knuth mentioned, all three volumes of his books were translated into Russian within a very short interval.

Academic degrees were also mostly fake (much like they are in the USA now ;-): one of my friends told me that his Ph.D. from top Ukrainian University was counted only as a master degree in the USA by the commission which studied his thesis (I believe in NYU)

But again, most good western books on tech subjects were translated and were somewhat available. And if you compare Feynman lectures (which were also translated) to Soviet physics textbooks, Soviet textbooks were not even competitive. Some "cutting edge" books was OK. But very few.

The professors and lectures (including professors large part of which were just incompetent jerks, promoted due to nepotism or Communist party activities) deteriorated to the level that was simply painful to watch. Some came to lectures completely unprepared or drank, or tried to teach some completely bogus theories of their own invention. Many did not come at all sending assistants.

My impression is that essentially, in 1990, Soviet science and education experienced the same crisis as the Communist social system as a whole.

But I think students learn as much from each other as from professors, and if the level of the class was extremely high, the results were corresponding. In other words, poor university teachers did not harm them that much, and a lot what they learn, they learn on their own (except fundamental disciplines) -- kind of self-education buried within ;-).

Also, rigid soviet system (you have a zero opportunity to select your own set of subjects for a degree) has one important advantage. It schools you to be determined and persisting, no matter what subject you were assigned. To be a real fighter, in some academic or non-academic sense.

That was especially true as you also need to pass exams in Marxism philosophy and Political economy to get a degree. Those subjects were frown upon, but in retrospect were useful: students were forced to read classics, not junk like in neo-classical economics courses in the USA.

I think that the main reason for the high quality of Soviet engineers of this period was not the education the got, but the fact that talented people were nowhere to go; there was no "business path." That's why Berezovsky became an academic scholar and even reached the level of the Corresponding Member of the USSR Academy of Science

The level of backwardness of computer science education in the 90th in the USSR was staggering. So the fact that there were so many talented programmers in the country, many of whom later found a well-paid job in the Western countries, was mostly due to the level of the talent of those few who managed to get into universities.

Many problems with Soviet education persist in Russia. Andrei Martyanov looks at many problems of Russian society via rose glasses. Taking into account the current level of Russophobia, that's a noble stance, and I do not object to his exaggerations.

But the reality is more complex.

[Jan 19, 2020] IMF Chief Warns Global Economy Faces New Great Depression

Notable quotes:
"... While the inequality gap between countries has closed over the last two decades, the gap within most developed countries has widened, leaving millions more vulnerable to a global downturn than they otherwise would have been. ..."
"... "In the UK, for example, the top 10% now control nearly as much wealth as the bottom 50%. This situation is mirrored across much of the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development), where income and wealth inequality have reached, or are near, record highs." ..."
"... Having considered all of this, we'd like to present another scenario: if Trump loses in November, and the Fed regains the courage to raise interest rates now that President Trump isn't around to publicly browbeat and humiliate them, that might be enough to send markets into a tailspin, even if the Dems take the 'market friendly' road and nominate Joe Biden. ..."
Jan 19, 2020 | www.zerohedge.com

How's this for some New Years optimism?

The new head of the IMF, who took over from Christine Lagarde in November, warned that the global economy could soon find itself mired in a great depression.

During a speech at the Peterson Institute, IMF Chairwoman Kristalina Georgieva compared the contemporary global to the "roaring 20s" of the 20th century, a decade of cultural and financial excess that culminated in the great market crash of 1929. According to the Guardian, this research suggests that a similar trend is already under way , and though the collapse might not be around the corner, when it comes, it will be impossible to avoid.

While the inequality gap between countries has closed over the last two decades, the gap within most developed countries has widened, leaving millions more vulnerable to a global downturn than they otherwise would have been.

In particular, she singled out the UK for criticism: "In the UK, for example, the top 10% now control nearly as much wealth as the bottom 50%. This situation is mirrored across much of the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development), where income and wealth inequality have reached, or are near, record highs."

... ... ...

This is further evidenced by the fact that, every time the Fed has tried to wean the American economy off of rock-bottom interest rates or the central bank's ever-expanding balance sheet, markets have reacted with fury.

Having considered all of this, we'd like to present another scenario: if Trump loses in November, and the Fed regains the courage to raise interest rates now that President Trump isn't around to publicly browbeat and humiliate them, that might be enough to send markets into a tailspin, even if the Dems take the 'market friendly' road and nominate Joe Biden.


Joyo Bliss , 33 minutes ago link

As soon as she said climate change was a threat, my ******** detector peaked and flashed.

IvannaHumpalot , 24 minutes ago link

yes that's where i stopped reading and came to the comments instead

kbohip , 57 minutes ago link

I stopped reading when I read "climate emergency" coming from someone that's supposed to be talking about economics.

onwisconsinbadger , 58 minutes ago link

More QE, more printing and zirp till infinity. Nothing has changed since 2008. Casino opens again on Tuesday, buy Stawks.

ReturnOfDaMac , 4 minutes ago link

Now 'ya talkin'. BTFD!

radical-extremist , 59 minutes ago link

Climate Change Theory will be looked back on as a rather frivolous and eccentric belief system within 10 years

captain noob , 1 hour ago link

There is a deeper problem in this modern capitalist earth. Human relations are deteriorating. Because of competitiveness, showing off, jealousy, materialism and consumerism.

Modern humans are alienated human zombies who have no purpose in life except to compete.

Compete for what anyway?

radical-extremist , 1 hour ago link

Women no longer like men and babies. In so doing, they've become a combination of both.

IvannaHumpalot , 19 minutes ago link

liar. Men no longer like women they only want teens, **** and casual sex

they detest actual women, don't want to settle down and make a family in their 20s with a woman their own age - and wonder why at age 55 they are sitting on a bar stool alone with the other men drinking too much

then they go to thailand and find some desperately poor 20yo who will marry them for a passport

and then they wonder why as soon as citizenship comes through, the thai divorces their sorry old arse and goes to make a new life for herself

then they're sitting alone and bitter age 60 hating all women

captain noob , 17 minutes ago link

Women don't like women either

Farmer Tink , 32 minutes ago link

Prof. Robert Putnam is a sociologist from Harvard. He completed a massive study of immigration in the 2000s which showed that immigration destroys societal trust and social capital. Very little has been written about it, and the results of the study were summarized in a Swedish English-language scholarly journal only--Putnam usually writes books that can be comprehended by the intelligent lay reader. Someone who posts here wrote that the study was available on Tor. Many studies with similar findings have been done since. If we ended immigration, we might lessen the alienation in society today.

captain noob , 28 minutes ago link

Then how will the cheap workers get in?

Enraged , 1 hour ago link

A representative of a globalist banking institution who "warned that fresh issues such as the climate emergency and increased trade protectionism meant the next 10 years were likely to be characterized by social unrest and financial market volatility."

But she does not mention the real causes of the problems, the bankster ponzi scheme creating massive inflation or globalist corporations lowering wages by outsourcing jobs and increasing immigration, while using debt to buyback stocks instead of capital investment.

Place another conniving spokesperson on the ignore list, along with the current and past Fed Reserve representatives.

Salsasas , 1 hour ago link

I hope y'all are ready for green communism after the engineered collapse.

"Kristalina Georgieva was born in Sofia into a family of bureaucrats.[15] Her father was a civil engineer who supervised state road-building projects,[16] and her grandfather was a prominent Bulgarian revolutionary Ivan Karshovski.[17]"

"Georgieva holds a PhD in Economics and an MA in Political Economy and Sociology from the Karl Marx Higher Institute of Economics (now called University of National and World Economy) in Sofia.[18][19] Her thesis was on "Environmental Protection Policy and Economic Growth in the USA". She also did post-graduate research and studies in natural resource economics and environmental policy at the London School of Economics in the late 1980s and at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.[20]"

"Georgieva started her career at the World Bank Group in 1993 as an environmental economist for Europe and Central Asia. Following this, she served in various positions in the bank ultimately rising to become director of the Environment Department in charge of World Bank's environmental strategy, policies, and lending. In this role she oversaw around 60% of lending operations of the World Bank Group. From 2004 to 2007 she was the institution's director and resident representative in the Russian Federation, based in Moscow.

She returned to Washington, D.C., to become director of Strategy and Operations, Sustainable Development."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kristalina_Georgieva

crypt007 , 1 hour ago link

The US elite super rich benefits tremendously from their slave economies in Europe and Japan. ECB Draghi a former Goldman Sachs always had a huge stimulus plan and staggering amounts of asset purchases --the last was 2.9 Trillion Euros-- that at the end of the day benefited the most the US and the US elite super-rich and Japan's BoJ Kuroda does the same-thing.

johnberesfordtiptonjr , 8 minutes ago link

The US elite super rich is delighted, the highly corrupt Trump administration made the US elite super-rich richer and richer while the middle class gets poorer and poorer and disappears.


This plan actually began with Reagan. Trump is just continuing (and accelerating) the process.

[Jan 19, 2020] 'Buffett Indicator' Warns Stocks Doomed for Worse Crash Than 2008 by W. E. Messamore

Jan 19, 2020 | www.ccn.com

January 6, 2020

US stock market

The so-called 'Buffett Indicator' is flashing an ominous warning sign for Wall Street. | Image: Spencer Platt/Getty Images/AFP

The U.S. stock market kicked off the new decade at record highs. There are plenty of good reasons for the bulls' optimism. The cooling trade war, sliding recession risk, rising employment, and blue chip tech leadership are positive macro tailwinds.

But for those wondering how much longer the record-long bull market can last , the so-called Buffett indicator has a dreadful answer.

Buffett Indicator Flashes Red for Stocks

Named after the widely-venerated "Oracle of Omaha," the Buffett indicator reflects Warren Buffett's characteristically simple thinking about stock values. It's the total stock market capitalization of the United States relative to U.S. GDP.

If the indicator gets too top heavy, with the total market value of stocks significantly exceeding the productivity of the underlying companies, Buffett would say stock prices are due for a correction. The historical returns of the stock market back him up on that.

Today the indicator is soaring at a harrowing record high.

buffett indicator stock market capitalization to gdp st louis federal reserve
The Buffett Indicator is at a horrific historic high. | Source: Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Just before the Dot Com Bubble collapsed, total U.S. market cap stood at 146% of GDP , according to the Federal Reserve's books. Right before the Great Recession that began at the end of 2007, the U.S. market cap was 137% of GDP.

On the first day of trading in 2020, the Buffett indicator charted an ominous high of 153% , according to Wilshire data. As the stock market set records in the final quarter last year, the indicator rose 14% in one quarter. And corporate earnings growth is flat .

That's why this Nov 2019 headline from CNBC is silly :

Warren Buffett has $128 billion in cash to burn and analysts can't figure out why he isn't spending it.

Buffett already explained why two decades and two recessions ago.

'Mr. Buffett On The Stock Market'
stocks buffett indicator
Warren Buffett has seen it all. Judging by Berkshire Hathaway's balance sheet, he's not excited about stock prices today. | Source: AP Photo/Nati Harnik

Fortune ran an article in 1999 reporting Warren Buffett's rare remarks on the overall stock market. In the speech, given ahead of the Dot Com crash that would take the Nasdaq Composite years to recover from, Buffett predicted a market correction ahead.

He argued that traders can profit from a bubble in the short term by selling equities to each other. But in the final reckoning, stock values will average out to the ability of the underlying businesses to deliver profits.

Or as Buffett once told shareholders at an annual Berkshire Hathaway meeting, investors aren't investing in "lines that wiggle up and down on a graph."

His 1999 remarks spell doom after the stock market's bull run in 2019:

The fact is that markets behave in ways, sometimes for a very long stretch, that are not linked to value. Sooner or later, though, value counts.

He summarized the nature of equities bubbles:

Bear in mind–this is a critical fact often ignored–that investors as a whole cannot get anything out of their businesses except what the businesses earn. Sure, you and I can sell each other stocks at higher and higher prices.

And described the hard limit on stock returns:

The absolute most that the owners of a business, in aggregate, can get out of it in the end–between now and Judgment Day–is what that business earns over time.

If you go by the Buffett indicator, Wall Street is partying like it's 1999.

[Jan 19, 2020] How Central Banks Turned Hedge Funds into A New Recession Risk

Jan 19, 2020 | www.ccn.com

That's an unintended consequence of the flood of central bank liquidity. Systemic financial regulations designed to recession-proof the economy are tailored for banks. The $3.2 trillion hedge fund sector could be the weak point where the dam finally bursts.

The IMF warns in its semi-annual Global Financial Stability Report that:

the low-yield environment promotes an increase in portfolio similarities among investment funds that could amplify any market sell-off..

All-time low bond yields have sent investors in search of higher returns in riskier assets. A selloff of riskier securities in the asset management sector now poses a spillover threat to the broader economy. That's terrifying given the amount of leverage in hedge funds.

Low-interest rates direct the glut of liquidity in a monetary expansion to risky corners of the economy . So instead of fueling production as capital, the money is lost.

When this happens on a massive scale, you have the subprime lending crisis. And the resulting fallout in the mortgage-backed securities market. Then the subsequent credit crunch. And a loss of investor confidence. And a Great Recession.

Regulation Spurred Hedge Fund Risk

Taxpayers had to bail out banks that were "too big to fail." So regulations were passed to keep banks upright in the future. But that's like squeezing a balloon. There's still the same amount of air in the balloon. It just moves around.

Likewise, there's still the same amount of excess liquidity chasing risky assets in this low-interest rate balloon . The bank regulations just moved it around. Now the bad behavior lives in non-banking finance sectors like insurance and hedge funds .

The Wall Street Journal recently gave some troubling examples . Here's some of the bad behavior in the asset management industry today:

Funds are dabbling in riskier asset classes, including private markets, real-estate projects, infrastructure financing and direct lending. Some are making riskier fixed-income bets, buying volatile assets such as 100-year Argentine government bonds. Others are going farther afield, investing in greenhouses and waste management.

It used to be fine for wealthy investors to put their own finances at risk. So long as they're the only ones to take a hit if they lose their investment, that's part of the game.

But now they could be putting the rest of the economy at risk. And a central bank says that central banks caused it. There are a lot of policymakers today proposing to raise taxes on the wealthy to shore up the rest of the economy. Maybe just not handing them so much money in the first place would be a good start.

Disclaimer: The opinions in this article do not represent investment or trading advice from CCN.com.

This article was edited by Samburaj Das .

[Jan 19, 2020] The Pharisee took up his position and spoke this prayer to himself: 'O God, I thank you that I am not like the rest of humanity -- greedy, dishonest, adulterous -- or even like this tax collector over there.

Jan 19, 2020 | jessescrossroadscafe.blogspot.com

"The one who does most to avoid suffering is, in the end, the one who suffers the most: and his suffering comes to him from things so little and so trivial that one can say that it is no longer objective at all. It is his own existence, his own being, that is at once the subject and the source of his pain, and his very existence and consciousness is his greatest torture."

Thomas Merton

"One reason we rush so quickly to the vulgar satisfactions of judgement, and love to revel in our righteous outrage, is that it spares us from the impotent pain of empathy, and the harder, messier work of understanding.

Let me propose that if your beliefs or convictions matter more to you than people -- if they require you to act as though you were a worse person than you are -- you may have lost perspective."

Tim Kreider

"The Pharisee took up his position and spoke this prayer to himself: 'O God, I thank you that I am not like the rest of humanity -- greedy, dishonest, adulterous -- or even like this tax collector over there."

Luke 18:11

[Jan 19, 2020] Neoliberalism sees competition as the defining characteristic of human relations

Jan 19, 2020 | jessescrossroadscafe.blogspot.com

"Neoliberalism sees competition as the defining characteristic of human relations. It redefines citizens as consumers, whose democratic choices are best exercised by buying and selling, a process that rewards merit and punishes inefficiency. It maintains that "the market" delivers benefits that could never be achieved by planning.

We internalise and reproduce its creeds. The rich persuade themselves that they acquired their wealth through merit, ignoring the advantages – such as education, inheritance and class – that may have helped to secure it. The poor begin to blame themselves for their failures, even when they can do little to change their circumstances.

It has played a major role in a remarkable variety of crises: the financial meltdown of 2007‑8, the offshoring of wealth and power, of which the Panama Papers offer us merely a glimpse, the slow collapse of public health and education, resurgent child poverty, the epidemic of loneliness, the collapse of ecosystems, the rise of Donald Trump. But we respond to these crises as if they emerge in isolation, apparently unaware that they have all been either catalysed or exacerbated by the same coherent philosophy; a philosophy that has – or had – a name. What greater power can there be than to operate namelessly?"

George Monbiot

"Progress is a nice word. But change is its motivator. And change has its enemies."

Robert F. Kennedy

"`But you were always a good man of business, Jacob,' faltered Scrooge, who now began to apply this to himself.

`Business!' cried the Ghost, wringing its hands again. `Mankind was my business. The common welfare was my business; charity, mercy, forbearance, and benevolence, were, all, my business. The dealings of my trade were but a drop of water in the comprehensive ocean of my business!'

It held up its chain at arm's length, as if that were the cause of all its unavailing grief, and flung it heavily upon the ground again.

`At this time of the rolling year,' the spectre said `I suffer most. Why did I walk through crowds of fellow-beings with my eyes turned down, and never raise them to that blessed Star which led the Wise Men to a poor abode! Were there no poor homes to which its light would have conducted me!'

Scrooge was very much dismayed to hear the spectre going on at this rate, and began to quake exceedingly.

`Hear me!' cried the Ghost. `My time is nearly gone.'"

Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

"I made a mistake in presuming that the self-interests of organisations, specifically banks and others, were such that they were best capable of protecting their own shareholders and their equity in the firms."

Alan Greenspan, apologising for his disastrous, ideologically-biased policies promoting financial deregulation , 23 October 2008

"Two souls, alas, are housed within my breast,
And each will wrestle for the mastery there...

To speak the truth, as truth to me appeared,
Caused noisy protest, I was hooted down.
Such unpleasant incidents occurred
I ran off, to be on my own,
into a wilderness. Utterly forsaken,
I fell into that devil's grip, and was taken."

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Faust

"Honest, industrious, peaceful citizens were classed as bloodsuckers, if they asked to be paid a living wage. And they saw that praise was reserved henceforth for those who devised means of getting paid enormously for committing crimes against which no laws had been [or could be] passed. Thus the American dream turned belly up, turned green, bobbed to the scummy surface of cupidity unlimited, filled with gas, went bang in the noonday sun."

Kurt Vonnegut, God Bless You Mr. Rosewater

"Isn't it a riddle and awe-inspiring that things can be so beautiful, despite the horrors? I've seen something wondrous peering through my joy in the beautiful, a sense of its creator.

Only people can be truly ugly, because they have free will to separate themselves from this song of praise. It often seems they may drown out this hymn with cannon thunder, curses, and blasphemy. But I have realized they will not succeed. And so I want to throw myself on the side of the victor."

Sophie Scholl

"Four sorrows are certain to be visited on the United States.

"Do not be fooled into thinking that you will never suffer because you say that I dwell among you. It is your delusion and lying words. Do you really believe you can steal, murder, commit adultery, lie, and worship the gods of the world and those other new gods of yours, and then come here and stand before me in my own house and say, 'We are safe', only to go right back to all your lawlessness again? Do you not see that this house of yours, which you mark with my name, has become a den of thieves?"

Jeremiah 7:5-7

[Jan 19, 2020] Trump and his Iran adventure

Jan 19, 2020 | jessescrossroadscafe.blogspot.com

"For fools rush in where angels fear to tread
Distrustful sense with modest caution speaks,
It still looks home, and short excursions makes;

But rattling nonsense in full volleys breaks,
And, never shocked, and never turned aside.
Bursts out, resistless, with a thundering tide."

Alexander Pope, Essay on Criticism

[Jan 19, 2020] The Ponzi Scheme that masquerades as the Outlaw US Empire's economy is entering its 12th year

Jan 19, 2020 | www.moonofalabama.org

karlof1 , Jan 17 2020 23:16 utc | 51

In The Rise and Fall of Great Powers , Kennedy shows that economic decline is what causes such polities to fail. On top of all Hudson's material I've linked to today and over the years, there's the occasional bit of truth shown by media via video, in this case this "Keiser Report" episode : "Capitalism Without Capital." The pertinent information and argument are all presented in the first half of the program up to the break, which is all of about 13-14 min. Those who've read Kennedy's work will note the connection to which I refer. Those not knowing economics but having common sense can also understand the meaning of what's being discussed.

The Ponzi Scheme that masquerades as the Outlaw US Empire's economy is entering its 12th year. Note Hudson's remark from the linked discussion above: "A lot of 70 year-olds need employment." They need jobs but aren't counted as unemployed just as millions of others. Actual unemployment's still over 20%. To even attempt to make its citizenry whole, tens of millions of jobs must be created--lets call it 60 million. For comparison, Clinton got almost 66 million votes in 2016.

Wall Street cannot be bailed out again. "Creative Destruction" must be allowed to take its toll.

Patroklos , Jan 17 2020 23:19 utc | 54

As many others here have pointed out in this and other threads, the scenario sketched by Michael Hudson nicely lays out the fault-lines of US foreign policy. The history of reserve currencies maps onto the history of empires quite nicely from the Athenian coinage decree (date controversial, between 440-420 BCE), to the pound sterling. The novelty of the capitalist eras (1450-present) is public debt and the relationship between currencies of account and parcels of state securities (like T-bills). Hudson lucidly describes the self-reinforcing cycle between fossil fuel denomination ('petro-dollars') and military financing (with those dollars purchasing the treasuries which pay for the bombs). The longer-term view, however, suggests that empires are protection rackets designed to direct and skim capital flows . It is worth looking historically even at pre-capitalist empires.

For example, the relationship between Rome's foreign-military policy and its interventions in Spain and the Hellenistic East in the second century BCE was linked closely to a parasitic expropriation of resources that eventually warranted greater and greater intervention and direct control.

The US military needs to be seen in the same way; but this means that a gap opens up between the popular (imaginary) view of its function (a Saving Private Ryan image held by soldiers and citizens) and its real role as the enforcer of a global financial racket. In Rome a similar kind of gap led in part to the breakdown of republican politics and the civil wars of the late first century BCE -- and in the end the de facto monarchy of the Augustan regime, where Senate and People quickly became relics and ceremonial forms masking the reality of power.

It was not until Tacitus (80 years after Augustus' death!) that Romans could finally admit it to themselves.

Have US political institutions reached that stage yet? Of course there are huge differences between Rome and modern states (separation of civil and military sectors, the existence of a bureaucracy, complex financial alchemy, etc), but the conflicts usefully described here by b helpfully remind us of the very ancient function of organised militaries: they either protect the racket, or, better still, they are the racket.

[Jan 19, 2020] IMF boss says global economy risks return of Great Depression

Jan 19, 2020 | www.moonofalabama.org

vk , Jan 17 2020 23:56 utc | 67

Now even Bulgarian neoliberal stooge Georgieva is feeling the heat:

IMF boss says global economy risks return of Great Depression

[Jan 19, 2020] It has been the longest bull market in modern history, enabled by massive Central Bank intervention. But with trade wars raging, Brexit, Presidential impeachment over something, etc., there remains a significant risk of a recession over the next 12 months.

Jan 19, 2020 | jessescrossroadscafe.blogspot.com

"It has been the longest bull market in modern history, enabled by massive Central Bank intervention. But with trade wars raging, Brexit, Presidential impeachment over something, etc., there remains a significant risk of a recession over the next 12 months.

If we look at the normalized change in the 10Y-3M curve minus normalized change in 10Y yields, we can see a heightened recession risk. Lower yields and steeper curves are not a good recipe. And then we have the decline in S&P 500 earnings estimates. Recession coming?"

Anthony Sanders, Confounded Interest

"Day by day the money-masters of America become more aware of their danger, they draw together, they grow more class-conscious, more aggressive. The [first world] war has taught them the possibilities of propaganda; it has accustomed them to the idea of enormous campaigns which sway the minds of millions and make them pliable to any purpose.

American political corruption was the buying up of legislatures and assemblies to keep them from doing the people's will and protecting the people's interests; it was the exploiter entrenching himself in power, it was financial autocracy undermining and destroying political democracy. By the blindness and greed of ruling classes the people have been plunged into infinite misery."

Upton Sinclair, The Brass Check

"There is no clean way to make a hundred million bucks. Somewhere along the line guys got pushed to the wall, nice little businesses got the ground cut out from under them. Decent people lost their jobs. Big money is big power, and big power gets used wrong."

Raymond Chandler, The Long Goodbye

"The very banality and innocence of the first act only allowed the blow to fall afterwards with more awful effect."

Robert W. Chambers, The King In Yellow

"There is no trap so deadly as the trap you set for yourself."

Raymond Chandler, The Long Goodbye

"Whoever commits a fraud is guilty not only of the particular injury to him who he deceives, but of the diminution of that confidence which constitutes not only the ease but the existence of society."

Samuel Johnson

"The world of finance hails the invention of the wheel over and over again, often in a slightly more unstable version."

John Kenneth Galbraith

"Make no mistake about it, just as Lehman Brothers was set up to take the fall for triggering the 2008 collapse, China is being groomed as the new scapegoat for the coming crisis. But China's economic slump is only a symptom, not the disease.

The reality is that the repeal of Glass-Steagall ushered in the greatest wealth transfer scheme in the history of America, allowing six mega banks in America to control the vast majority of insured deposits, use those taxpayer-backed deposits to gamble for the house, loot the bank from the inside by paying billions of dollars to select employees and customers and then hand the gambling tab to the taxpayer when the casino burns down. This model is a staggering headwind on both U.S. and global growth because it has created the greatest wealth and income inequality since the Great Depression."

Pam and Russ Martens

"Each day we are becoming a creature of splendid glory, or one of unthinkable horror."

C. S. Lewis

"Congratulations to the Federal Reserve. You've successfully created the most extreme, pre-collapse yield-seeking bubble in U.S. history! With lower return prospects than Aug 1929. While encouraging a debt bubble where half of all 'investment grade' debt is one step above junk."

John P. Hussman

"All the world marveled at this, and gave their allegiance to the Beast. And they worshiped the dragon for giving such power to him. as they also worshiped the Beast. 'Who is as great as the Beast?' they exclaimed. 'And who is able to resist him?' The Beast was allowed to commit great blasphemies against God. And he was given the authority to do as he willed, but only for forty-two months."

Revelation 13:3-5

"Democratic leaders must learn to talk about class issues again. But they won't on their own. So pressure must come from traditional liberal constituencies and the grass roots, like the much-vilified bloggers...

The more comfortable option for Democrats is to maintain their present course, gaming out each election with political science and a little triangulation magic, their relevance slowly ebbing as memories of the middle-class republic fade."

Thomas Frank, Rendezvous With Oblivion, NYT 2006

[Jan 19, 2020] US External Balance Sheet: Big Borrower and Giant Corporate Tax Dodge

Jan 19, 2020 | www.cfr.org

"At the end of the day, perhaps, the equity side of the U.S. external balance sheet should be understood not by thinking of the U.S. as a giant and very successful private equity fund that borrows to buy equity -- but rather as one giant corporate tax dodge for U.S. based multinationals

If you think I am exaggerating, I would encourage you to take a look at the IRS data on the location of U.S. corporate profits -- and the location of the taxes that American firms pay abroad. U.S. firms are earning big profits in jurisdictions where they don't pay tax, and small profits in jurisdictions where they do and in the process, reducing their U.S. tax bill as well. That's real exorbitant privilege."

Brad Setser, US External Balance Sheet: Big Borrower and Giant Corporate Tax Dodge

[Jan 18, 2020] The inability of the USA elite to tell the truth about the genuine aim of policy despite is connected with the fact that the real goal is to attain Full Spectrum Dominance over the planet and its people such that neoliberal bankers can rule the world

Highly recommended!
Jan 18, 2020 | www.moonofalabama.org

karlof1 , Jan 17 2020 19:24 utc | 6

Yes! The inability to tell the truth about the genuine aim of policy despite its being published because that policy goal--to attain Full Spectrum Dominance over the planet and its people such that neoliberal bankers can rule the world--is actually 100% against genuine American Values as expressed by the Four Freedoms (1.Freedom of speech; 2.Freedom of worship; 3.Freedom from want; 4.Freedom from fear) and the articulated goals/vision of the UN Charter--World Peace arrived at via collective security and diplomacy, not war--which are still taught in schools along with Wilson's 14 Points. Then of course, there's the war against British Tyranny known as the Spirit of '76 and the Revolutionary War for Independence and the documents that bookend that era. In 1948, Kennan stated, in an internal discussion that was never censored, the USA consumed 60% of global resources with only 5% of the population and needed to somehow come up with a policy to both continue and justify that great disparity to both the domestic and international audience. Yet, those truths were never provided in an overt manner to the American public or the international audience. The upshot being the US federal government since it dropped the bombs on Japan has been lying or misleading its people such that it's now habitual. And Trump's diatribe against the generals reflects the reality that he too was taken in by those lies.

[Jan 18, 2020] The US China Phase 1 Deal Interpeted: Break Thing, Claim to Fix Thing, Repeat

Highly recommended!
Jan 18, 2020 | econbrowser.com

...if nothing had happened in the US-China trade war. Well, me might have gotten to where we are supposed to be with the deal

..a honest question. In terms of the environment and global climate, is it a good thing that farmers will be producing more monoculture grains, dairy, beef and pork for export?

[Jan 16, 2020] Will The US Obsession With Sanctions Destroy The Dollar

Notable quotes:
"... Authored by Ryan McMaken via The Mises Institute, ..."
"... "Washington is treating the EU as an adversary. It is dealing the same way with Mexico, Canada, and with allies in Asia. This policy will provoke counter-reactions across the world." ..."
"... The National Interest ..."
"... Treasury's War: The Unleashing of a New Era of Financial Warfare ..."
"... "We must increase Europe's autonomy and sovereignty in trade, economic and financial policies ... It will not be easy, but we have already begun to do it." ..."
Jan 16, 2020 | www.zerohedge.com

by Tyler Durden Thu, 01/16/2020 - 17:50 0 SHARES

Authored by Ryan McMaken via The Mises Institute,

When the US places financial sanctions one one country, it de facto sanctions many other countries as well -- including many of its allies.

This is because not all countries and firms are interested in participating in the US sanctions-based foreign policy.

Sanctions, after all, have become a favorite go-to strategy for American policymakers who seek to isolate or punish foreign states that don't cooperate with US international policy goals.

In recent years, the US has been most active in imposing new sanctions on Russia and Iran, with many consequences for US allies who are still open to doing business with both of those countries.

The US can retaliate against organizations that violate US sanctions in a variety of ways. In the past, the US has sued firms such as the Netherlands' ING Groep and Switzerland Credit Suisse. Both firms have paid hundreds of millions of dollars in fines in the past. The US has been known to go after individuals .

US bureaucrats like to remind firms that penalties await them, should then not buckle under US sanctions plan. In November 2018, for example, US Secretary of State Michael Pompeo announced :

I promise you that doing business in Iran in defiance of our sanctions will ultimately be a much more painful business decision than pulling out of Iran.

Fear of sanctions has caused some firms to stop work mid project, such as when Swiss pipe-laying company Allseas Group abandoned a $10 billion pipeline that was nearing completion.

Not surprisingly, these firms -- who employ people, pay taxes, and contribute to economic growth -- have put pressure on their governments to protest the mounting interference from the US into private trade.

As a result, some European politicians are increasingly looking for ways to get around US sanctions . In a tweet last week, Germany's deputy foreign minister Niels Annen wrote "Europe needs new instruments to be able to defend itself from licentious extraterritorial sanctions."

Another "senior German government official" concluded, "Washington is treating the EU as an adversary. It is dealing the same way with Mexico, Canada, and with allies in Asia. This policy will provoke counter-reactions across the world."

But how is the US so easily able to sanction so much of the world, including companies in huge and influential countries like Germany?

The answer lies in the fact the US dollar and the US economy remain at the center of the international trade system.

SWIFT: How the US Sanctions the World

By the waning days of the Cold War, the US dollar had become the dominant currency in the non-communist world, thanks to the Bretton Woods agreement, the petrodollar, and the sheer size of the US economy.

Once the Communist Bloc collapsed, the dollar was poised to grow even more in importance, and the world's financial institutions searched for a way to make global trade and investing even faster and easier.

Henry Farrell at The National Interest describes what came next:

Financial institutions wanted to communicate with other financial institutions so that they could send and receive money. This led them to abandon inefficient institution-to-institution communications and to converge on a common solution: the financial messaging system maintained by the Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunication (SWIFT) consortium, based in Belgium. Similarly, banks wanted to make transactions in the globally dominant currency, the U.S. dollar. ... In practice, the physical infrastructure, for a variety of efficiency reasons, tended to channel global flows through a small number of central data cables and switch points.

At the time, Europe was still years away from creating the euro, and it only seemed natural that a centralized dollar-transfer system be developed for all the world.

SWIFT personnel have always maintained their organization is apolitical, neutral, and only interested in providing a service. But geopolitical realities have long intervened. Farrell continues:

The centralizing tendencies meant that the new infrastructure of global networks was asymmetric: some nodes and connections were far more important than others. ... What this meant was that a few states -- most prominently the United States -- had the latent ability to transform the global economic infrastructures ... into an architecture of global power and information gathering.

By 2001, the power of this centralized system had become apparent. And in the wake of 9/11, the US used the "War on Terror" and an opportunity to turn SWIFT into an enormous international tool for surveillance and financial power.

In his book Treasury's War: The Unleashing of a New Era of Financial Warfare Juan Zarate shows how the US Treasury officials pressured SWIFT and its personnel to provide the US government with the means to use this international financial "plumbing" to deprive the US's enemies of access to markets.

This started out slow, and SWIFT officials were concerned it would become widely known that SWIFT was becoming politicized and largely a tool of the US and US allies. Nevertheless, the American regime pressed its advantage, and by 2012 "for the first time ever, SWIFT unplugged designated Iranian banks from its system, in accordance with a European directive and under the threat of possible US legislation."

This only strengthened worries among both world regimes and the world's financial institutions that the basic technical infrastructure of the international financial system was really a political tool.

The World Searches for Alternatives

Naturally, Russia and China have been highly motivated to find alternatives to SWIFT. But even perennial US allies have grown far more wary of leaving the financial system in a place where it can be so easily dominated by the US regime. If Iranian banks can be "unplugged" so easily from the global system, what's to stop the US from taking similar steps against German banks, French banks, or Italian banks?

This, of course, is an implied threat behind US demands that European companies not try to work around US sanctions or face "punishment." From the US perspective, if Germans refuse to kowtow to US policy, then there's an easy solution: simply cut the Germans off from the international banking system.

Consequently, Germany's Foreign Minister Heiko Maas announced in 2008

"We must increase Europe's autonomy and sovereignty in trade, economic and financial policies ... It will not be easy, but we have already begun to do it."

By late 2019, the UK, France, and Germany had put together a workaround called "INSTEX" designed to facilitate continued trade with Iran without using the dollar and the SWIFT system built upon it. Belgium, Denmark, Finland, the Netherlands, Norway and Sweden have joined the system as well.

As of January 2020, however, the cumbersome system remains unused. But we remain in the very early stages of European efforts to get a divorce from the dollar-dominated financial system. The INSTEX system has been devised, for now, for a limited purpose. But there is no reason it cannot be expanded in the future. The short-term prospects for a functional system are low. Longer-term, however, things are different. The motivation for a long-term workaround is growing. The Trump administration has embraced showmanship that looks good in a short-term news cycle, but which encourages US allies to pull away. Farrell continues:

Unlike Obama, Donald Trump did not use careful diplomacy to build international support for [new sanctions] against Iran. Instead, he imposed them by fiat, to the consternation of European allies, who remained committed to the [Iran agreement put in place under Obama]. The United States now threatened to impose draconian penalties on its allies' firms if they continued to work inside the terms of an international agreement that the United States itself had negotiated. The EU invoked a blocking statute, which effectively made it illegal for European firms to comply with U.S. sanctions, but without any significant consequences. SWIFT, for example, avoided the statute by never formally stating that it was complying with U.S. sanctions; instead explaining that it was regrettably suspending relations with Iranian banks "in the interest of the stability and integrity of the wider global financial system."

All of this is viewed with alarm by not only Europe, but by China and Russia as well. The near-constant stream of threats by the US administration to impose ever harsher limits and sanctions on both China and Europe has pushed the rest of the world to accelerate plans to get around US sanctions. After all, as of mid-2019, the US had nearly 8,000 sanctions in place against various states and organizations and individuals. The term now being used in reference to American sanctions is " overuse ." It was one thing when the US imposed sanctions in some extreme cases. But now the US appears increasingly fond of using and threatening sanctions regularly, without consulting allies.

This makes continued US dominance in this regard less likely as allies the world pour more and more resources into ending the US-SWIFT control of the system. In a 2018 report, "Towards a Stronger International Role of the Euro," the European Commission described U.S. sanctions as " wake-up call regarding Europe's economic and monetary sovereignty. "

The effort still has a long way to go, but perhaps not as far as many think.

Source.

The dollar remains far ahead of the euro in terms of the dollar's use as a reserve currency, but the dollar and the euro are move evenly matched when it comes to international payment transactions.

If the rest of the world remains sufficiently motivated, more can certainly be done to rein in dollar-based sanctions. Indeed, in 2019, former US Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew admitted :

the plumbing is being built and tested to work around the United States. Over time as those tools are perfected, if the United States stays on a path where it is seen as going it alone there will increasingly be alternatives that will chip away at the centrality of the United States.

If the US finds itself not longer at the center of the global financial system, this will bring significant disadvantages for the US regime and US residents. A decline in demand for the dollar would also lead to less demand for US debt. This would put upward pressure on interest rates and thus bring higher debt-payment obligations for the US regime. This would constrain defense spending and the ability of the US to project its power to every corner of the globe. At the same time, central bank efforts to drive interest rates back down would bring a greater need to monetize the debt. The resulting price inflation in either consumer goods or assets would be significant.

The fact none of this will become obvious next week or next month doesn't mean it will never happen . But the US's enthusiasm for sanctions means the world is already learning the price of doing business with the United States and with the dollar.


Arising , 11 minutes ago link

Sanctions are a weak man's weapon when he can't/won't negotiate.

Maghreb , 29 minutes ago link

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-Nazi_boycott_of_1933 January....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Executive_Order_6102 April

Took three months to pass the legislation to seize control of the Gold supply even though they knew the U.S defaulted on the War debt of first world war and America was only partially involved.

Better move fast. U.S has not declared War for real since Pearl Harbour.

Best way to avert it is to look at the economic calculations being made and slow what they need for this extended and probably apocalyptic war to start.

They need man power for what is planned but I have a suspicion this time they are planning for megadeath on all sides.

Schroedingers Cat , 2 hours ago link

The Us Dollar will be destroyed sometime between now and 1 week before the Sun turns into a red giant and swallows the Earth.

uhland62 , 1 hour ago link

Nothing will be destroyed. Situations like this are about chipping away and crumbling. Rome was not built in a day. People sit in wait to find a weak spot of the hegemon and if you think that the US is a perfect and perpetual hegemon than you are as delusional as Obama.

He bragged in 2015 that he/they twisted arms of countries when they did not do what he 'needed' them to do. (See y-tube). Every country, every person who had arms twisted is sitting in wait to hit back. Chisel away, apply needlepricks, obedience can be forced; desire for revenge never dies.

You need to treat people well on your way up because you are meeting them all again on your way down.

CashMcCall , 2 hours ago link

Will The US Obsession With Sanctions Destroy The Dollar?

Hopefully it will destroy the US BULLY TOO...

This saga of Sanctions all started with the Black Jesus Obama and Russia. It was a disaster then, harmful to Russian women and children and never affect the oligarchs. It is Stalingrad stuff.

Then along comes the pile of **** known as the Orange Jesus. Considering Trump's pretend hatred of Obama, he sure loved the community organizers weaponizing of the Dollar Reserve... So much so the orange ******* now has 40% of the world population under Dollar Reserve Sanctions. More Stalingrad ****. And the world hates it.

So there is no question that nations will find ways around sanctions and the mother fking pencil necked poodles that support this mfkirng ****. They can't comprehend that if TRUMP does this to some country, he can do it to them.

The Dollar Reserve was intended to be apolitical a means of global commerce. At Bretton Woods, Maynard Keynes addressed the Reserve Currency to avoid this. He recommended a synthetic reserve currency composed of five of the world's leading currencies called the BANCOR. He was voted down by the US delegation that only would accept the Dollar over the Pound. Britain was too weak after the war to oppose the US. So that set up the Dollar Reserve by intimidation and bullying. What else is new.

Now the US uses their 800 military bases to enforce their Sanctions and Dollar reserve weaponizing.

This will come to an end. Europe is a larger economy than the US and Asia is larger than the US and Europe Combined. So this dollar reserve weaponizing crap will end.

Interesting isn't it that the two most economically illiterate presidents in history, love sanctions. I promise, the Dollar reserve as the primary currency of exchange is THE DEAD MAN WALKING.... They are also the most RACIST presidents in US History.

CashMcCall , 2 hours ago link

Goldamn did a white paper on this... If the US loses the Dollar Reserve the GDP would tank 30%. So yeah... welcome to the the stone age and fighting in the streets. But to neutralize the dollar Reserve damage only requires competition to the US Dollar.

So far the Yuan is not printed in enough quantity to compete in a big way. The Euro has never shown the inclination to be anything but a poodle.

WWII has never ended. Look at NATO... who are they opposing... RUSSIA. Give it a rest. Russia is not going to attack Europe. So this NATO military facade is about to crumble. Trump attempting to get NATO to attack Iran and enter the Middle east is laughable and won't happen. Only the British Poodles are stupid enough for that.

And why is Britain fking with anybody... Doesn't the Queen have enough RYSIST issues now that Harry and Megan have called her a RYSIST? Love to see Britain go it alone but they are real pussies and have filled the world with hatred so there will be consequences.

alphasammae , 3 hours ago link

Sanctions use the same philosophy of the the Mafia and having to use it means the days of the dollar hegemony are gradually ending. What goes around comes around. yin-yang.

jm , 3 hours ago link

Probably, but it will take a while. Alternatives are few at present.

CashMcCall , 2 hours ago link

YES but for the first time they are present. The Euro is a Reserve Currency but Europe has never asserted its status. Likely due to Germany. Germany destroys Europe in so many way. Merkel is pathetic.

Now the Yuan as of 2016 is a reserve currency and they are trading Iron ore from Australia and Brazil in Yuan. Also China has a 24 Trillion dollar internal commodities market that trades in Yuan. So the mechanics of massive Trade are already set in place in China and Asia.

Traditionally the largest trading nation had the reserve currency. The US is no longer the largest trading nation. They are the largest debtor nation however.

Maghreb , 21 minutes ago link

This only Bretton woods post World War II rules. Back in the old days gold was trusted because people who had it actually hd to produce or trade for it. War economy is always pure fiat even if it means killing your own soldiers and robbing their families.

https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/article/veterans-face-greater-risks-amid-opioid-crisis/

If it gets dirty everyone is going to have to play the game. Why do you think they are still dealing with Afghanistan like its the centre of the universe for the last 20 years.

PTSD and ******** propaganda on young men is enough to push them over the edge. Same thing for the nasty **** that happens to women.

All these currencies are pure fiat floating against perceived demand and ******** technocrats. People want to die in these situations they are going to monetize human misery. The opiate epidemics in the 60s pushed the U.S of the Gold standard. Where do you think the French got all those U.S dollars from straight after the war.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_Connection

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nixon_shock

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eMs6eI1VRBQ

fackbankz , 1 hour ago link

Ever heard of this little thing called cryptocurrency? It can't be weaponized like a CB currency because there is no centralized authority and no need for a trusted third party. It can cross international borders at the speed of light and cheaply to boot. It's quite clever. I imagine it will become all the rage in the next couple years.

Maghreb , 35 minutes ago link

I dont think you understand the concept of war. They napalmed kids to heard their parents into concentration camps. That was the Pentagon. Theyre not going to spare your internet service provider in the name of free trade and libertarian finance.

Bit coin can be used the same way as the military script just by switching off your computer and forcing you to adopt another currency. They did it every few months in Vietnam. IBM ran the analytics with a super computer and they still didnt beat the Tet Offensive which was just people letting of steam for lunar new year by killing anyone who worked with the Americans.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Military_payment_certificate

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strategic_Hamlet_Program

After World War II penicillin was a global commodity used as black market currency to cure venereal disease.

https://www.bbc.com/news/technology-50851420

Hedge. Iodine for fallout. Water purification tablets. Toilet Paper and Sanitary wipes and shoes. Batteries. You wont be allowed to grow food when it starts.

Demeter55 , 3 hours ago link

Economic sanctions, sanctions of any kind, are like pepper: use cautiously, sparingly, and only when the recipe calls for it. Don't inhale, either. Massive sneeze attacks can follow and the dish can be ruined.

pedoland , 3 hours ago link

the Fed destroyed the dollar

madashellron , 3 hours ago link

IT'S CALLED SHOOTING YOURSELF IN THE FOOT, NOT ONCE BUT A THOUSAND TIMES!

Mustafa Kemal , 3 hours ago link

CAATSA, Countering American Adversaries Through Sanctions,

https://www.treasury.gov/resource-center/sanctions/Programs/Pages/caatsa.aspx

signed by Trump in 2017 means we have essentially entered into a world where the American regime is weaponizing sanctions to dominate the planet.


Of course, karma is a law, which cannot be avoided, and this article is right. It is only a matter of time. Moreover, he is right in that when we lose this status our ability to wage endless wars throughout the planet will stop. I hope to see that day.

It is my feeling that the primary reason we are not in a major war at this moment is that our "adversaries" have noted our decline, as well have many astute and not so astute ZH members have, and are waiting us out. The other is that our military is not as good as we claim and some of us know it.

https://www.amazon.com/Losing-Military-Supremacy-American-Strategic-ebook/dp/B07DVSM76H/ref=sr_1_2?keywords=martyanov&qid=1579218682&sr=8-2

Element , 3 hours ago link

... the American regime is weaponizing sanctions to dominate the planet.

Good. Because the alternative is to bomb countries.

Element , 3 hours ago link

... and are waiting us out. The other is that our military is not as good as we claim and some of us know it.

Because everyone else's military is so much better, right?

Idiot.

Mustafa Kemal , 3 hours ago link

You appear "ideologically possessed" as Jordan Pederson says; namely you do not seek the truth but have a position to promote.

Here read em and weep

https://www.amazon.com/Losing-Military-Supremacy-American-Strategic-ebook/dp/B07DVSM76H/ref=sr_1_2?keywords=martyanov&qid=1579218682&sr=8-2

logicalman , 3 hours ago link

It's hard to break with the Mob.

NotAGenius , 1 hour ago link

You don't, alive.

44magnum , 3 hours ago link

Zionist banker bucks masquerading as US Dollars.

No US dollars since 1913

3rdWorldTrillionaire , 3 hours ago link

Not true, the US Treasury issued certificates backed by silver as late as the 1960s.

Silver Fox 47 , 3 hours ago link

Truth bomb

BillEpstein , 3 hours ago link

american war whores sure have proven eisenhower to be a prophet

Silver Fox 47 , 3 hours ago link

along with Gen. Smedley Butler

indus creed , 1 hour ago link

....who, unlike Ike, was a combat General.

Element , 3 hours ago link

No

crypt007 , 4 hours ago link

GOLD should be trading currently at least at 4,800 and SILVER should be trading today at triple digits -- The Federal Reserve and PPT like to manipulate the precious metals, stop manipulating the PM morons.

Let's take a look at the SILVER chart:

SILVER -- TF = Daily -- SILVER --time frame is daily-- has developed a very well known technical pattern CUP and HANDLE -- SILVER STRONG BUY -- https://invst.ly/pie5l

Son of Captain Nemo , 4 hours ago link

$USD was already DOA when Don Rumsfeld declared that $2.3 trillion ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a6pkCG9fs3I ) was missing from the DOD t he day before this was allowed to ( https://www.ae911truth.org/ ) happen!...

The rest is shall we say "academic" ( https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-03-29/true-size-us-national-debt-including-unfunded-liabilities-222-trillion-dollars )!!!

P.S.

"Donny Appleseed" send$ his tiding$ to the American lemming... counting all those "0"s that are only gettin bigger with each sweep of the EST "second hand".

Still allowed to be "alive" after all that damage and all these years!

NotAGenius , 1 hour ago link

See "logicalman"'s comment above. You can't break with the mob. Alive.

crypticcurrency , 4 hours ago link

I just attended a China - US conference. The chinese fund managers who spoke there said that China's economy is at a standstill and now is the time for "VULTURE" funds to be active acquiring heavily discounted firms which are over-leveraged. Not the sounds of a ready for prime time currency. And the market know as less than 2% of global reserves are Yuan as in the chart and Chinese dollar reserves are 30% of what they were years ago.

CashMcCall , 2 hours ago link

who ran the conference BANNON.

PGR88 , 4 hours ago link

Germany's deputy foreign minister Niels Annen wrote "Europe needs new instruments to be able to defend itself from licentious extraterritorial sanctions."

Dare we say the word? (((gold)))

crypt007 , 4 hours ago link

The BIG problem with the US dollar is not only the data but it is also the staggering amounts of printing, printing, printing and QE4ever that totally destroy the purchasing power of the US Dollar. Only GOLD and SILVER are the real 'store of value'.

Let's take a look at the US Dollar chart:

US DOLLAR Index -- TF = 4H -- ROUNDED TOP suggesting much lower levels ahead -- US DOLLAR STRONG SELL -- https://invst.ly/pj042

inhibi , 4 hours ago link

Like how in the 80's everybody assumed flying cars were "near future", people who think the dollar will lose (or already lost) reserve status are delusional.

It will take a long long time to ween the world off of the entire banking complex, literally made by and through the dollar.

Multiple reasons, primarily:

1) US gov still a strong presence around the world militarily and financially

2) US dollar still the #1 currency used in transactions between major firms

3) US banking system has, in its pockets, about 80% of the worlds billionaire class, which conversely, makes most of the major decisions around the world

4) SWIFT system and World Bank both huge institutions that literally hold most 3rd world countries economics (see Venezuela for examples of a 3rd world country trying to NOT do what the US wants)

Woodenman , 4 hours ago link

When you build a house of cards it can collapse faster than you can blink.

TBT or not TBT , 2 hours ago link

Tell that to the mullahs. Shades of the Berlin Wall moment for the USSR.

eekastar , 4 hours ago link

All 4 are loosing credibility fast

Consuelo , 4 hours ago link

In a static geopolitical environment, your points are valid. After all, it's been this way for a very long time. You would - and perhaps will be however, amazed at just how fast the dynamics of your 4 points can change when two near equally (and in some cases superior) military and economic world powers are geopolitically pushed to a limit they will no longer accept. And guess what? That's coming a whole lot sooner than most think.

Element , 3 hours ago link

Too much truth!

You've got the anti-crown shrieking, "The End Is Nigh!".

They'll still be screaming it in 2050, while they themselves are being lowered into a coffin.

Mustafa Kemal , 3 hours ago link

The days of US Military Supremacy are over

https://www.amazon.com/Losing-Military-Supremacy-American-Strategic-ebook/dp/B07DVSM76H/ref=sr_1_2?keywords=martyanov&qid=1579218682&sr=8-2

luffy0212 , 2 hours ago link

Your comparison is retarded. Economically you been overtaken

Chinese and Russians just haven't completely crash JUSA dollar to allow the world to transition away from you parasites without feeling much pain.

we know you dontunderstand the word pragmatism.

Militarily

you can be removed conventionally at any moment and be made to bleed dry

again Pragmatism comes into play

what better way then to allow the war criminals to crumble on their own and left stranded around the world once dollar goes bloop


alternative payment systems are being implemented and put into use

but again a transition must gradually allow for broader use to avoid the pain and aches that come with hastily made moves

again the word pragmatism comes into mind

lastly 80% is no longer the case

And the percentage keeps decreasing day by day

yerfej , 4 hours ago link

EVERY ******* in Washington needs to go and be replace with people who have an interest in the well being of the country rather than their personal power plays. The world HATES the Washington assholes almost as much as the US citizens hate the bastards.

Woodenman , 4 hours ago link

Superbly inteligent coment!

JBL , 1 hour ago link

biden....36 yrs in the senate?

yeah yeah, the woke electorate's gunna clean house n vote in the good guys

ted41776 , 4 hours ago link

you too can have freedom and democracy and live under the threat of losing everything you have if you don't do as you're told

WHERE DO I SIGN UP?

nope-1004 , 4 hours ago link

Sanctions are used to force another nation into compliance.

Bombs are used to force another nation into compliance.

Anyone still think the treasury and Fed aren't the biggest warmongers around? They have to be, otherwise the US dollar would be toast, as there is nothing but a military holding it up. A nation with 5% of the global population, full of fat walmart shoppers, does not have the productive means to force their will without the war machine. Ironically, that same war machine is fully funded by the foreigners the bankers bomb, as using the USD means you must hold dollar reserves. It is a grand racket.

Woodenman , 4 hours ago link

The Russia and Ukraine scandals leading to impeachment are nonsense but Trump should be impeached for hastening the demise of our reserve currency. Weaponizing the dollar was the dumbest strategy he ever came up with. Russia and China are gaining friends and influence every day while the U.S. is becoming an outcast. They are using the Carrot while all Trump knows is the Stick.

ReturnOfDaMac , 4 hours ago link

Bullshyt, it was King Dollar yesterday, it's King Dollar today, and by Gawd, it's King Dollar FOREVER!!

You will use our Dollar and dammit, you WILL like it.

CashMcCall , 2 hours ago link

Sounds like Kudlow has been back into the ding dong daddy white powder... LOL...

Don't forget SARC... some may not have captured your subtle humor.

cogitergosum , 4 hours ago link

The dollar's days as a global reserve currency are numbered because..

TRUMP LOST THE PETRODOLLAR.

The US UK Israel petrodollar system collapsed overnight with the US military having no credible response to having its base bombed. A credible response is for the US to have dealt death from the skies, destroying and severely deteriorating Iran's ballistic launch capabilities or at the least a strike on its major oil refineries. That did not happen. Why?

The US & UK airforce are outdated....in fact any conventional air force that relies on drones or stealth jets to deliver bomb payloads are outdated!

The purpose of an air-force is to bomb targets from the sky. Iranians have shown you can do it with ultra-cheap short medium range ballistic missiles which are nothing more than crap aluminum tubes filled with propellant, a low cost cell phone GPS guidance system and a big payload. You can make millions for the cost of one stealth jet!

IRAN has all US, Israel and Saudi targets mapped and gave a demo of what they can do. By the time the shitty F35s start their engines on a runway of a worthless aircraft carrier, thousands of these missiles will be launched by Iran destroying all targets within minutes of declaration of TOTAL WAR!

THE PURPOSE OF STEALTH has been defeated. There is no deterrence against ballistic missiles which are faster then aircraft! So by the time the first wave of stupid burger planes reach IRAN, all BURGER bases in Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Israel and aircraft carriers will have been destroyed! So the USA cant protect anything without losing everything!

TOTAL WAR even with a weak power like Iran means TOTAL BALLISTIC MISSILE WAR in which case everybody's base gets destroyed and who ever pushes the button fastest gets to destroy the targets fastest and everything is over in less than an hour! Since burgers dont have magic hollywood space lasers, just piece of **** F35s and outdated carriers....burgers cant defend anything! Burgers have no deterrence for TOTAL BALLISTIC MISSILE WARFARE. There is no time to start your engines and take off on a runway, the missiles are already on their way and will hit bases and aircraft carriers within 10 to 20 minutes of declaration of TOTAL WAR.

Trump killed a rook (solemani) in the game of geopolitical chess (which the Persians invented) and the mullahs in Tehran checkmated the USA and Israel by making redundant the view that only very very expensive stealth jets can accurately deliver bombs with precision! No brainer right there...a plane requires life support, complex systems just to support the idiot who is flying it to the target...a missile requires no stealth technology, its fast, accurate and deadly with no deterrent! In one stroke the mullahs revealed that the entire US air-force is obsolete against TOTAL short/ medium range ballistic missile war!

We should have had ballistic missile carriers but we dont because greedy defense contractor boomers think they are the smartest defense planners when in fact they just loved to build planes instead of realizing short range ballistic GPS guided precision missiles can do the same thing! But not much profit in that of course..

US air-force outdated = US ground troops outdated because they rely on US air-force for back up. So you have to withdraw = NO PETRODOLLAR.

As of today the US cannot defend its bases in Iraq, Israel or Saudi Arabia.... US/UK/Israel/Saudis combined cannot protect anything without losing everything!

That is called check-mate my friends. The petrodollar age has ended and the AGE OF THE PETROYUAN has begun. China copies everything the US does, they wanted their Saudi Arabia and they got all of IRAN and IRAQ.

Now Trump has to sign trade deal after trade deal because the world holds a massive amount of US securities and we have to supply real goods and services...opening up oil fields for export, everything. Burgers have to become a land of farmers and oil workers to satisfy all the US dollar holdings out there because TRUMP LOST THE PETRODOLLAR by DESTROYING US CREDIBLE MILITARY DETERRENCE for the whole world to see...the ability to provide 'SEGURIDY' AS HENRY KISSINGER would say.

Everybody now knows the US is just another power only burgers have their head up their asses. A big crash is coming our way and this time we DO NOT HAVE THE PETRODOLLAR FOR RECOVERY LIKE WE HAD IN 2008!

TRUMP LOST THE WESTERN PETRODOLLAR HEGEMON....HE LITERALLY LOST THE WEST!

THE PETRODOLLAR AGE OF PROSPERITY HAS ENDED! BECAUSE DRUMPF, KUSHNER AND NETANYAHU!

The EVANGELICAL BIBLICAL APOCALYPSE has come and gone! The GREAT SATAN as the mullahs would call them have been revealed to have no power to price oil in the middle east anymore! The military humiliation and withdrawal comes next...its a Greek tragedy in modern times...

Paraphrasing Thucydides

"A society that divides its warriors and scholars will have its wars planned by cowards and fought by fools"

That is true and accurate in the case of burgerland and its rulers!
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7881839/New-images-damage-caused-Iranian-missile-strike-Iraqi-base.html

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7893435/US-military-lost-contact-drones-overhead-Iranian-ballistic-missile-strike.html

DisorderlyConduct , 4 hours ago link

LOL. That's hilarious.

Trump knocked out a rook and a couple bishops, and ignored opportunities on several pawns. By not taking the bait, escalations fall onto Iran's shoulders and will be increasingly hard to justify.

Eventually their retaliation actions blur into the smoke of their terrorist proxies. Then they fulfill the role thst Trump claims they occupy. Then action on them will be easily justified. Even now Iran is shredding the JCPOA, that document that they acted like was so dear to them - thus giving the rest of the world the finger. Hey, you couldn't play their part worse if you tried...

Checkmate.

Woodenman , 4 hours ago link

Trump shredded the JCPOA, not Iran.

DisorderlyConduct , 3 hours ago link

Obama did by not putting it to the Senate for ratification. That is how the US becomes bound by a treaty.

Trump did what he had a right and the mandate to do. The JCPOA has no broad-based support in the US and still doesn't. Should have never existed.

That aside, The US was not the only nation in the agreement. The rest of you are free to work it out.

TBT or not TBT , 2 hours ago link

A U.S. induhvidual signed it. The U.S. declined to.

cogitergosum , 4 hours ago link

okay boomer

enjoy some petrodollar humor

http://boards.4chan.org/pol/thread/239782961/geopolitics-china-trade-deal-edition

DisorderlyConduct , 3 hours ago link

LOL.

luffy0212 , 1 hour ago link

You're the typical jarhead indispensable fodder dumbass.

no checkmate fool none at all.

close the high school history book.

Element , 3 hours ago link

What a ridiculous argument, the USA has its own oil and gas, more than the Saudis have!

Your version of reality is 40 years out of date.

Element , 3 hours ago link

There is no deterrence against ballistic missiles which are faster then aircraft! So by the time the first wave of stupid burger planes reach IRAN, all BURGER bases in Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Israel and aircraft carriers will have been destroyed! So the USA cant protect anything without losing everything!

That's what Hitler thought, Saddam tried it as well, the theory proved to be wrong.

The purpose of an air-force is to bomb targets from the sky. Iranians have shown you can do it with ultra-cheap short medium range ballistic missiles which are nothing more than crap aluminum tubes filled with propellant, a low cost cell phone GPS guidance system and a big payload. You can make millions for the cost of one stealth jet!

This was particularly hilarious. If that were the case the USA and its allies would be doing that. Do you not realize the US has had rocket artillery for the past 70 years? The larger the rocket, and the longer its range, the larger and heavier the transport TEL vehicle and support base and storage must be. The industrial and technical support base as well. And the crews to man and employ them get larger as well, as does their training equipping and paying of them.

That's in fact very expensive, and you run out of rockets real fast.

But stealth jets come back every day, for months, or years, and drop big-*** bombs on your missile factories, and its industrial support base, it's electricity supply, its fuel supply, its chemical factories, its bases, bunkers, sensors comms, personnel, ports and the entire industrial economic infrastructure of the entire country.

See Japan after WWII - that would occur to Iran.

The End

cogitergosum , 2 hours ago link

then why didnt you boomer? Because Iran's missiles will hit your base anyway..stealth or no stealth that is the point! The US was supposed to wage such a death match war against China or Russia...not a 4th rate shithole like IRAN. You boomers literally have your head up your asses. The 90s is over boomers! The boomer run US armed forces is totally obsolete because we have been humiliated and the boomers are so shameless they are behaving like 'colored peoples of poor upbringing'.

Hold me back or ill......hold me back or ill.... you will do what? Nothing! No one held burger boy trump back. Burger boy held himself back because he and his son in law and the prime brains behind losing the petrodollar, Netanyahu would lose Israel also along with Saudi Arabia and all burger bases!

TBT or not TBT , 2 hours ago link

We thought you didn't like pork. What's your beef with hamburger?

cogitergosum , 2 hours ago link

oh so I must be a muslim if I said Israel lost the petrodollar because the joke is on you clowns. Lose the petrodollar boomers lose their 401k and Israel has to negotiate with Iran to exist...win win if you ask me...cant wait to watch you flip burgers in your 80s.

luffy0212 , 1 hour ago link

The fact that you want us to use WWII Japan as comparison completely nullifies your rant. Furthermore, revisionism and hyped up ability does no good in the real world. We don't need to ask Hitler or Saddam. Had Saddam moved in on Saudi Arabia rather than allowing forces to amass it's been a different story. Regarding Hitler, you cinta had little to no hand in the matter. Case in point.

[Jan 16, 2020] The Plateau of Shale Production the Biggest Story of 2020

Notable quotes:
"... Such is the extent of the shakeout in the U.S. shale industry that Permian Basin oil production is closer to peaking than many forecasts suggest, according to one energy investor. ..."
"... Adam Waterous, who runs Waterous Energy Fund, regards the sector's financial position as unsustainable after years of disappointing returns for investors and negative free cash flow. With capital markets now largely shunning shale producers, the impact will begin to show in oil and natural gas output from the largest U.S. oil patch, he said. ..."
Jan 16, 2020 | peakoilbarrel.com

X says: 01/13/2020 at 6:45 pm The Plateau of Shale Production the Biggest Story of 2020?

https://www.financialsense.com/podcast/19463/slowing-shale-production-be-story-2020-says-adam-rozencwajg Reply

TonyEriksen says: 01/14/2020 at 1:48 am

Production from these selected top 9 US shale oil companies might be about to fall as shown by decreasing quarterly crude oil production changes in chart. ExxonMobil (XOM) shale oil is growing fast about 11% per quarter but probably not enough to offset declines from other operators.

EOG
Pioneer
Concho
ConocoPhillips
Marathon
Occidental incl Anadarko acquisition
Diamondback
Devon
ExxonMobil

XOM data is taken from shaleprofile.com, averaging three months into a quarter, then multiplying by 75% to get crude oil. 75% is used because Pioneer Natural Resources crude to total shale oil is 75% and Pioneer operates in the Permian which is also XOM main basin.

Dennis Coyne says: 01/14/2020 at 9:57 am
Pretty sure shale profile reports crude plus condensate, for "oil" production. As the data matches pretty closely with the EIA's tight oil estimates by play when Oklahoma output is excluded (shaleprofile only reports Oklahoma output on the subscription service.)

In short, one should not assume 75% of what is reported at shale profile is the "crude" portion of output. In fact all US output is reported as crude plus condensate, all the way back to 1860.

There is also Chevron, BP, and Shell operating in US tight oil, all have deep pockets and will be unaffected by the tightening up of the credit markets. In the past 2 years these 5 have doubled their tight oil output, though most of the increase occurred in 2018 when oil prices were higher.

Output may drop, that in turn will lead to higher oil prices and higher tight oil output, also the majors will be able to pick up cheap assets as smaller oil companies that have not been financially prudent go bankrupt, that may accelerate the growth of tight oil output from the majors as oil prices rise.

Dennis Coyne says: 01/14/2020 at 10:55 am
Here is output from 5 oil majors for US tight oil from

https://shaleprofile.com/blog/us-monthly-update/us-update-through-september-2019/

Output was 839 kb/d in Sept 2019, 402 kb/d in Sept 2017, and 686 kb/d in Sept 2018.

Output from Shell, Exxon/Mobil, Conoco-Philips, Chevron, and BP.

Synapsid says: 01/14/2020 at 7:18 pm
DC,

Liquids produced at natural-gas processing plants are excluded. Those are the NGPLs if memory serves and are not NGLs which I think of as coming from NG at the well head.

In other words liquid from NG is listed two ways: The stuff obtained at the well head (NGL) and the stuff obtained farther down the line at NG processing plants (NGPL), and the latter is not included as oil. This is from my failing memory but so is my ability to find my way home most of the time.

Hmm it's been a while since Port.

Dennis Coyne says: 01/15/2020 at 7:49 am
What some do not realize is that the natural gasoline (which condenses from the natural gas stream at standard temperature and pressure of 1 ATM, 25 C) has always been included in the crude plus condensate data in the US since 1860. The lower carbon chain products (C2, C3, C4) are not liquids at STP, they are gases and remain in the natural gas stream until they are separated at the natural gas processing plant. The definition given by the EIA is quite clear on this point.
TonyEriksen says: 01/14/2020 at 6:46 pm
In the Permian basin, the ratio of crude to total oil (incl NGL) produced by Pioneer has fallen from 81% at beginning of 2016 to 75% at the end of 2019. If this fall is similar for other Permian producers then it may be harder to continue increasing Permian crude production.

TonyEriksen says: 01/14/2020 at 6:50 pm
The comparison between oil production from shaleprofile.com and from Pioneer is very close, as shown by the two green lines. For 2019Q3, shaleprofile production was 286 kbd compared to 290 kbd from Pioneer quarterly report. Note that both these numbers include crude, lease condensate and NGLs.
http://www.pxd.com/

Freddy Gulestø says: 01/14/2020 at 9:35 pm
I read an very interested report here on this forum where US geological Institute had estimated break even prices for Thiere 6 to 1. Thiere 6 was categorizized as sweet spots with more than 800 kbpd. As I remember this had break even cost 18 usd each barrel and to next class you could aproximately multiplay it with 3. I believe this is much of the core knowledge the Pioneer Mark Papa is estimated US future shale production at wich again is related to change in rock quality. What we know is in 2014 -2015 I believe US could earn money at least with some borrowings at 30 usd WTI , 5 years after tjey cant earn money at 60 usd WTI even with huge improvement in drilling efficiency that it is a reason to believe will go much slower in future. Labour cost and all other will continue to increase. It might be break even price in 2025 will be above 120 usd WTI iff Thiere 5 runs out as same as Tiere 6 the sweet spots. This mean we will be back to the situation before 2014 when the main source off oil was offshore, and investment was there. It simply means US need to cut more cost in shale oil, develop more oil from wells drilled in less quality rock but this challange might be very hard to solve even for Exxon that is ramping up, the question will be if their barrels are profittable at 42 usd WTI as they predict. Perhaps Mr. President could give tax release, or simply start buy up the 1500 billion in depth that need to be payed next 4 years.
Dennis Coyne says: 01/15/2020 at 10:58 am
Tony,

Some people may consider natural gasoline (which condenses from Natural gas in the lease separators) as "NGL", I consider this this to be lease condensate and generally is is mixed with the crude and sold with the crude. Perhaps Pioneer keeps a separate account of "crude" and "condensate", in the US these are usually lumped together as C+C, most of the NGPL produced in the US is Ethane (C2), Propane (C3), and Butane (C4), about 12% of the NGPL is natural gasoline (C5), roughly 600 kb/d of a 5000 kb/d total output of NGPL. Note that the US does not count the pentanes plus from NGPL plants as part of C+C output even though it is chemically very similar to lease condensate. In Canada, for example the pentanes plus from NGPL is added to C+C from the field, not sure why the US does things this way, Canada's approach seems more sensible.

See https://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_gp_dc_nus_mbblpd_m.htm

Jack says: 01/14/2020 at 11:20 pm
what are they smoking at the EIA they expect production to keep on increasing through dec/jan while rigs and frac spreads have cratered ..

Great comments on twitter re the data and EIA response to questioning how they get to their numbers

https://twitter.com/ZmansEnrgyBrain?lang=en

TonyEriksen says: 01/15/2020 at 12:41 am
Such is the extent of the shakeout in the U.S. shale industry that Permian Basin oil production is closer to peaking than many forecasts suggest, according to one energy investor.

Adam Waterous, who runs Waterous Energy Fund, regards the sector's financial position as unsustainable after years of disappointing returns for investors and negative free cash flow. With capital markets now largely shunning shale producers, the impact will begin to show in oil and natural gas output from the largest U.S. oil patch, he said.

"We think we are at or near peak Permian" production, Waterous said last week in an interview. "The North American oil market has been grossly overcapitalized, which is not sustainable."

Predicting peak Permian output for 2020 isn't a mainstream view. There's plenty of debate about how much production growth in the West Texas and New Mexico patch may slow this year as shale drillers slash capital spending, but the consensus is that supplies will rise, albeit at a slower pace. Tai Liu, an analyst at BloombergNEF, said in a report Tuesday that the pessimism may be overdone.

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2020-01-14/peak-permian-oil-output-is-closer-than-you-think-investor-says

Watcher says: 01/15/2020 at 2:57 am
Just because there are newcomers I will re offer up a consideration.

If you have to have it, and you do have to have it, you are not going to let a substance created from nothingness on a whim by the local Central Bank get in the way.

This is a peak oil blog, and that means scarcity. When something that you have to have is scarce, then you are going to go get it. The concept of price is a parameter of value -- value that exists only in the imagination of counterparties. Oil moves food and your stomach doesn't care about the imagination of counterparties. So don't be so sure that price determines production. Or consumption.

Anybody notice that the price is rather a lot less than it was five or six years ago? How does production compare to then?

HuntingtonBeach says: 01/15/2020 at 11:38 am
"'There are known knowns. There are things we know that we know. There are known unknowns. That is to say, there are things that we now know we don't know. But there are also unknown unknowns. There are things we do not know we don't know."

Economics is the study of how people allocate scarce resources for production, distribution, and consumption, both individually and collectively.

Supply and demand is the amount of a commodity, product, or service available and the desire of buyers for it, considered as factors regulating its price.

Watcher, we don't live in a perfect world of instant information and production.

" Over the past five years, the industry and its investors "mistook a massive structural change for a simple cyclical event," he said. "It's impossible to continue to have uneconomic production and capex.""

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2020-01-14/peak-permian-oil-output-is-closer-than-you-think-investor-says

Watcher, maybe some day you will figure out you need to apologize to Dennis for your ignorance and demeanor. Until than your the loser.

Watcher says: 01/15/2020 at 10:46 pm
It is basic stuff. I can show you many time periods of increasing price that aligned with increasing consumption.

And again, worst of all, you know I can show those time periods.

The theory fails. If you find even one instance where it is wrong, it fails. That's the scientific method. The hypothesis is proposed. Experiments are observed. If even one fails to support it, that's failure. That's how it's always worked.

There is no oh, but. Price is lower than 6 years ago and production is higher. 2010 to 2014 price rose from $95/b to $112/b. Consumption 2010 89 bpd to 2014 93 mbpd. I found that without breaking a sweat.

The theory fails. Embrace a new one. And why be surprised? It's a substance whose value derives from whimsy and counterparty imagination

Lightsout says: 01/15/2020 at 4:17 am
US gas production in decline.
https://amp.ft.com/content/6a39af48-3719-11ea-a6d3-9a26f8c3cba4?segmentid=acee4131-99c2-09d3-a635-873e61754ec6&__twitter_impression=true
Dave P says: 01/15/2020 at 1:43 pm
Search the article name in google and open it from there, this gets around the paywall for me.

[Jan 16, 2020] The average price for 2019 was $56.72 WTI for 2019 doesn't seem to be exciting anyone.

Jan 16, 2020 | peakoilbarrel.com

shallow sand x Ignored says: 01/10/2020 at 1:53 pm

$56.72 WTI for 2019 doesn't seem to be exciting anyone.

That was the average price for 2019.

I think the major agencies see US C + C topping 20 million BOPD by 2030.

Along with the slow but steady increase in renewables, just not much of a reason to get excited about oil. Reminds me a lot of the 1990s.

Jack x Ignored says: 01/10/2020 at 3:59 pm
So rigs and frac spreads continue to fall yet almost all experts predict continued LTO growth . it would appear the day of reckoning is coming and the majors in the Permian will not save the day .. wasn't everyone hoping for a pick up in rigs and spreads as budgets were meant to be renewed in the new year
Jack x Ignored says: 01/10/2020 at 7:53 pm
I think independents are finally getting it that they can't simply look to increase production as soon as the POO goes up.

I think the change has solely been bought about by investors requiring a return on investment, I'm not sure we can surmise that LTO producers will act as they have in the past, I suspect it will take a sustained period of high POO before LTO producers open the spigots it will create even more of a boom/bust scenario going forward ..

Stephen Hren x Ignored says: 01/11/2020 at 7:36 am
I agree with you Jack, a large increase in oil prices seems unlikely to have much boost in LTO production for several years because banks will want significant loan payback before increasing drilling budgets. Dennis' model is an excellent BAU projection, but we live in more dynamic times than that imho. Banks will need a consistent high oil price to lend like they did in the past. That seems unlikely given possibility for recession, war, EV adoption, increased regulation from Democratic prez, etc.

Wall Street is obsessed with the shiny new thing and that is not FF production. Tesla's share price now more than GM and Ford combined.

Stephen Hren x Ignored says: 01/11/2020 at 9:35 am
Debt mountain for shale producers 2020-2023. Maybe once they get past this mountain banks will be ready to loan again and rig counts and frac spreads will increase. But only if there's a consistently high oil price during this period so banks have confidence to lend and debt is substantially reduced.

https://oilprice.com/Energy/Energy-General/US-Oil-Companies-Face-240-Billion-Debt-Mountain.html

shallow sand x Ignored says: 01/11/2020 at 8:01 am
It's all about the Permian and has been for quite some time.

None of the other shale basins have enough rigs running to grow production significantly.

The Bakken is probably the most economic besides the Permian, and it seems the operators there are in maintenance mode with regard to production.

There are still 397 rigs running in the PB. That is still a large number. I suspect there are more locations left there than in the remaining shale basins combined (not counting the ones which produce mostly natural gas).

Ron Patterson x Ignored says: 01/11/2020 at 8:49 am
It takes rigs to drill wells and frak spreads to complete them. No, rigs and frak spreads have not improved their efficiency that much in such a short time. And drillers and frakers are not working that much faster.

What you are seeing, or are about to see, is a slowdown in completions. The frak spreads that are being retired have obviously just finished completing a well. But they will not be completing another one. That's why you see a lag between falling rig and frak spread count and completions.

Ron Patterson x Ignored says: 01/11/2020 at 11:59 am
Hell, that's all we need Dennis. If the total number of national frac spreads fall then the total completions, nationwide, will fall. If production falls everywhere except the Permian, then that decline will offset any increase in the Permian.

Okay, we know that the lions share of frac spreads are for oil therefore???

I think you are way overplaying your hand with this efficiency stuff. Last time when rigs and frac spreads declined, then production declined. Why should it be any different this time?

The simple fact of the matter is: "The total number of frac spreads are falling". Therefore completions will fall because retired frac spreads frac no new wells. Yes, it is as simple as that. Saying the remaining frac spreads will be more efficient therefore completions will not fall, is just wishful thinking at best, and total nonsense at worst.

The Primary Vision Frac Spread Count is 275 for the week ending January 10th, 2020.

Jack x Ignored says: 01/11/2020 at 2:57 pm
Well said Ron losing frac spreads means that the maximum number of completions able to be completed has decreased – the concept of increased efficiency is a red herring when spreads have fallen 40%!in the past 6 months – spreads efficiency sure hasn't risen 65% in the same time ..

I think we all agree once the worm turns in the Permian LTO production will decrease, I am not sure producers will increase production as the POO rises they do have to pay back a lot of debt and have shareholders to answer to who want a return ..

Freddy Gulestø x Ignored says: 01/11/2020 at 3:55 pm
From what I have read there is always improvement of efficiency in operation regarding new Buisinesses such as shale. This improvement is normaly linked to exsperiance, increased volumes i.e. but typical it will slow down during time as much of the easy potential will be taken out. I see this as drilling padds, skidding systems as same rig could drill more wells without be dismantled and mounting again. Dere have also been improvements in latheral lenghts, propant, and fluid . But as Slumberger wrote in 2019, they believed max latheral lenght already is reach as if increased cost off equipment will be much higher and also risk increase when operating atbthe limit, more tear i.e. There might still be improvements but more slow than it have been. According to reports the break even price increase 4-5 times each Tiere class, and I believe rock quality will be a main challange in years to come as shale will need higher oil price to earn money, pay back ballons and dividends.
Jack x Ignored says: 01/11/2020 at 8:09 pm
Let's see the next quarterlies from LTO producers noting the continued comments about being profitable under $50. If Permian centric producers cannot profit on maintaining production output we know Houston we have a problem going forward .. will the companies be able to stick to using cash flows from continued operations only or will we see more excuses carted out again .
Stephen Hren x Ignored says: 01/12/2020 at 7:28 am
Gail makes the case for an oil peak for 2018, predicting production down 1% in 2020 in a low-price environment. Her take is worth a read even though she likes to go far out on a limb with little support sometimes

https://oilprice.com/Energy/Energy-General/Recession-Fears-Cap-Oil-Prices-In-2020.html

TonyEriksen x Ignored says: 01/13/2020 at 1:57 am
Production from these selected top 8 US shale oil companies might be about to fall as shown by decreasing quarterly crude oil production changes as in chart below.

EOG
Pioneer
Concho
ConocoPhillips
Marathon
Occidental incl Anadarko acquisition
Diamondback
Devon

Jack x Ignored says: 01/13/2020 at 2:32 am
very interesting graph it shows what is evident that independents are being forced into financial discipline at last. I cannot see the majors picking up the slack regardless of what the MSM say, why would they continue with the growth at all costs strategy which has caused noting but carnage for the above 8 producers.
TonyEriksen x Ignored says: 01/13/2020 at 7:34 am
Majors won't be picking up the slack according to the top 5 from https://shaleprofile.com/2020/01/07/us-update-through-september-2019/

Dennis Coyne x Ignored says: 01/13/2020 at 12:10 pm
Looks like XOM grew quite strongly. Their pockets are deep, they can buy up assets on cheap as smaller companies fail, fairly standard in capitalism.
Jack x Ignored says: 01/13/2020 at 4:10 pm
Can XOM do all the heavy lifting itself once the independent growth plateaus then falls is the million $ question. My bet XOM will grow but in a sustainable way, the impact of the Permian increase will be interesting to note in their quarterly how much has that growth cost them is the question ..
Dennis Coyne x Ignored says: 01/13/2020 at 4:54 pm
Jack,

If we look at Exxon/Mobil, Chevron, Conoco-Philips, Shell, and Total combined, they have increased combined tight oil output from 400 kb/d to 840 kb/d in the past 2 years (Sept 2017 to Sept 2019). Most of this increase occurred from Sept 2017 to Sept 2018 when oil prices were a bit higher, in the past 12 months output grew by only 155 kb/d. Oil prices matter, low oil prices may kill tight oil output growth, if so, oil prices are likely to rise.

shallow sand x Ignored says: 01/13/2020 at 9:44 pm
Dennis.

I read some of your models some of the time, so forgive me if this question you have already answered.

When you model the Permian, how many wells are you assuming?

It seems the EFS and Bakken likely do not have years of locations left, at least on a large scale. Likely why there aren't a lot of rigs.

If there are a decade of locations for 400 rigs in the PB, I suspect oil prices will remain range bound.

Dennis Coyne x Ignored says: 01/14/2020 at 9:47 am
Shallow sand,

For my "medium oil price scenario" (maximum WTI price of $83/b in 2018$ reached in 2027), we get about 195,000 total wells drilled, about 110,000 total horizontal tight oil wells get completed from 2010 to 2030 (about 26,000 have been completed through November 2019) so roughly 80k wells completed from Sept 2019 to Sept 2029 in scenario below.

Also link below has spreadsheet you can play with.

Changing row 4 changes completion rate to any rate that seems reasonable. Scenario ends in 2030 for this particular spreadsheet, you can use excel, google sheets, or some other spreadsheet program, it is saved in microsoft excel format.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1fyAD5-CngWdgq_kaZ7ow1k7O_dNr8xaW/view?usp=sharing

On prices remaining range bound, that depends in part of how quickly oil consumption grows. From 1982 to 2018 the average rate of growth in annual oil consumption has been about 800 kb/d. My $83/bo model has US tight oil growing by about 385 kb/d over the next 7 years, it is not clear that the rest of the World will be able to fill the 415 kb/d gap each year (assuming the 800 kb/d C+C consumption growth continues for the next 7 years). That is why I expect oil prices to rise.

There has been relatively low offshore oil investment over the past 5 years and this is likely to start affecting World oil output soon, the bumps in output from Brazil and Norway are likely to be offset by declines in other producing nations (Mexico, China, and UK) and it is far from clear that we will see higher output from Iran, Venezuela, Libya, or Nigeria.

As always the future is difficult to predict and I am often wrong, so perhaps oil prices will remain "range bound" in your preferred $55 to $65/bo range. If that is correct Permian output will grow far more slowly, perhaps growing from 4 Mb/d to about 6 Mb/d. The low oil price scenario has about 72,000 wells completed from Sept 2019 to May 2030 in the Permian, about 52,000 wells in all other US tight oil basins for a total of about 124,000 wells for the low oil price scenario over that period. The completion rate falls from 850 in 2030 to zero in 2035 for the low oil price scenario and output falls from 8200 kb/d at the start of 2030 to 2600 kb/d at the end of 2035.

I think it unlikely oil prices will remain range bound when World oil output peaks in 2026, that is only 6 years away, growth in oil output will slow significantly starting in 2024 and oil prices are likely to rise (at the latest) by June 2023.

shallow sand x Ignored says: 01/14/2020 at 11:36 am
Thanks.

That is a lot of locations. Of course, not all locations are the same productivity wise.

Incredible how much oil the Permian Basin has produced and will produce in the next decade.

Interesting how many companies sold out most of their acreage in the PB in the late 1980s and 1990s, thinking it was past its prime.

I know of a small operator that bought leases in the PB and drilled some good vertical wells. Martin Co. I don't know what they paid, but I am sure it was a tiny fraction of the $600 million they sold out for a three years ago.

QEP bought about 9,500 acres from them for $600 million. There was 1,400 BOPD of production from vertical wells at the time of the sale.

I have been looking at the wells QEP has drilled on this acreage. I don't think $600 million for 450 hz locations was a good deal for QEP. There are some good wells, but not enough of them.

Dennis Coyne x Ignored says: 01/14/2020 at 1:13 pm
Shallow sand,

Yes I agree, all locations will not have the same productivity, I use the average for all wells drilled for any given month as I am interested in the entire industry, some operators will have better wells than others, some of this is skill and some of it is luck, I simply assume generic company X will have a well productivity distribution that will be similar to the industry average, in practice this is not likely to be true, but if we think of the entire Permian basin as being run by a single large oil producer (Big Permian Oil Company) it would be approximately correct, if my economic assumptions are correct.

I also find it amazing how much tight oil has been produced (5.6 Gb so for for Permian since Jan 2000) and will be produced ( a total of 29 Gb for my model from Jan 2000 to May 2030, and for longer scenarios out to Dec 2079, about 60 Gb URR for Permian basin alone.) Mike Shellman thinks that is completely wrong, but if the USGS mean estimate is roughly correct and my medium oil price scenario and other economic assumptions are correct, that is what the model suggests might happen. Mike is not a fan of the USGS TRR estimates, their F95 estimate is 43 Gb for Permian Basin URR, my low oil price scenario is in line with that F95 TRR estimate, with a URR of about 37 Gb.

If the TRR is low, oil prices are likely to be higher and a higher percentage of the TRR is likely to be profitable to produce. (For a low TRR scenario the EUR would decrease more rapidly than my "medium" TRR assumption (the basis for my best guess estimates).

I assume new well EUR starts to decrease starting in Jan 2019. In Dec 2018, my model has the average Permian well with an EUR of 378 kbo. Chart below shows how the model assumes the EUR will change from Sept 2019 to May 2030 (end of model scenario) for the Permian scenario I presented above.

Again this is a guess for how future EUR will change based on a TRR scenario (no economics) with 255,000 wells and a TRR matching the USGS mean estimate of 75 Gb for the Permian basin. The rate that the EUR decreases depends on the number of wells completed each month. Chart is small, click on chart for larger chart.

So they paid 1.33 million per well, I agree the wells do not look very good, for a 2017 average well, QEP has cumulative output of 145 kbo, my basin wide average well has about 190 kbo at 24 months, so the QEP wells about 24% lower than average, yikes.

shallow sand x Ignored says: 01/14/2020 at 5:44 pm
QEP was $18/share when they bought the acreage. $4/share now.
Ovi x Ignored says: 01/13/2020 at 8:31 am
Tony

Great chart. 👍👍👍👍

Watcher x Ignored says: 01/13/2020 at 11:58 am
No evidence of any of that in chart.

[Jan 12, 2020] It's clear that when we ask the question "Who benefits greatly from this event", we are forced to say the US

Jan 12, 2020 | smoothiex12.blogspot.com

[Jan 11, 2020] Given shale oil dependence on debt / financialisation for "sustainability". I find Denningers analysis that the financial system is about to blow up based on basic exponential algebra relevant

Dec 21, 2019 | peakoilbarrel.com

Ignored says: 12/15/2019 at 11:05 am https://www.market-ticker.org/akcs-www?post=237637

Given shale oil dependence on debt / financialisation for "sustainability".

I find Denningers analysis that the financial system is about to blow up based on basic exponential algebra relevant.

His opinion is there is only one escape, and that is to blow up the entire medical industry (20% of GDP) in USA and end deficit spending.

Ironically, Mr. D is a peak oil denier because he thinks we can convert coal and kerogen to liquid fuel. Reply

Spider Man x Ignored says: 12/15/2019 at 4:58 pm

If you live is USA, (I moved a decade ago) and you have a medical procedure you need done. I would recommend not procrastinating and getting it done soon.

8% expense growth (faster than GDP) is unsustainable.

alimbiquated x Ignored says: 12/16/2019 at 11:31 am
The real problem with american health care is bad management. Hospitals have no idea how much it takes to cure a patient, and they sell treatments instead of cures. They don't know how much the treatments cost either, so they just make up numbers. Pharmaceutical companies charge whatever they can get away with, as the price of insulin shows.

Patients need more protection and better coverage so that insurers are forced to keep the healthcare providers honest. That is why insurers need to be forced to provide coverage. Markets economics works because the guy who pays applies pressure to the guy who delivers the goods. This idea needs to be applied to health care, and prices would get back in line with other rich countries.

[Jan 11, 2020] Blackstone Group , CEO Stephen A. Schwarzman Buys Houses in Bulk to Profit from Mortgage Crisis

Notable quotes:
"... These anecdotal stories about Invitation Homes being quick to evict tenants may prove to be the trend rather than the exception, given Blackstone's underlying business model. Securitizing rental payments creates an intense pressure on the company to ensure that the monthly checks keep flowing. For renters, that may mean you either pay on the first of the month every month, or you're out. ..."
Dec 19, 2019 | www.unz.com

renfro December 19, 2019 at 6:23 am GMT 2,600 Words

Tucker could have done a number on Trump friend Schwarzman too.Mark my words you're gonna have another melt down now that all the people who lost their home and ended up in rentals stop paying their rent that is now 2 1/2 times what their mortgage was.
This is another fake bubble being securitized and sold off. Just like putting people into houses with ARMs who couldnt afford them when the rates went up, Scharzman will fill up his rentals to 99% occupancy with special deals to sell them to investors, when the special deal period runs out and the rent goes up people will move out looking for cheaper housing and the securities wont be worth shit.

Blackstone Group , CEO Stephen A. Schwarzman Buys Houses in Bulk to Profit from Mortgage Crisis

https://corpwatch.org/article/blackstone-group-buys-houses-bulk-profit-mortgage-crisis

You can hardly turn on the television or open a newspaper without hearing about the nation's impressive, much celebrated housing recovery. Home prices are rising! New construction has started! The crisis is over! Yet beneath the fanfare, a whole new get-rich-quick scheme is brewing.
Over the last year and a half, Wall Street hedge funds and private equity firms have quietly amassed an unprecedented rental empire, snapping up Queen Anne Victorians in Atlanta, brick-faced bungalows in Chicago, Spanish revivals in Phoenix. In total, these deep-pocketed investors have bought more than 200,000 cheap, mostly foreclosed houses in cities hardest hit by the economic meltdown.
Wall Street's foreclosure crisis, which began in late 2007 and forced more than 10 million people from their homes, has created a paradoxical problem. Millions of evicted Americans need a safe place to live, even as millions of vacant, bank-owned houses are blighting neighborhoods and spurring a rise in crime. Lucky for us, Wall Street has devised a solution: It's going to rent these foreclosed houses back to us. In the process, it's devised a new form of securitization that could cause this whole plan to blow up -- again.

Since the buying frenzy began, no company has picked up more houses than the Blackstone Group, a major private equity firm. Using a subsidiary company, Invitation Homes, Blackstone has grabbed houses at foreclosure auctions, through local brokers, and in bulk purchases directly from banks the same way a regular person might stock up on toilet paper from Costco.

In one move, it bought 1,400 houses in Atlanta in a single day. As of November, Blackstone had spent $7.5 billion to buy 40,000 mostly foreclosed houses across the country. That's a spending rate of $100 million a week since October 2012. It recently announced plans to take the business international, beginning in foreclosure-ravaged Spain.

Few outside the finance industry have heard of Blackstone. Yet today, it's the largest owner of single-family rental homes in the nation -- and of a whole lot of other things, too. It owns part or all of the Hilton Hotel chain, Southern Cross Healthcare, Houghton Mifflin publishing house, the Weather Channel, Sea World, the arts and crafts chain Michael's, Orangina, and dozens of other companies.

Blackstone manages more than $210 billion in assets, according to its 2012 Securities and Exchange Commission annual filing. It's also a public company with a list of institutional owners that reads like a who's who of companies recently implicated in lawsuits over the mortgage crisis, including Morgan Stanley, Citigroup, Deutsche Bank, UBS, Bank of America, Goldman Sachs, and of course JP Morgan Chase, which just settled a lawsuit with the Department of Justice over its risky and often illegal mortgage practices, agreeing to pay an unprecedented $13 billion fine.

In other words, if Blackstone makes money by capitalizing on the housing crisis, all these other Wall Street banks -- generally regarded as the main culprits in creating the conditions that led to the foreclosure crisis in the first place -- make money too.

An All-Cash Goliath

In neighborhoods across the country, many residents didn't have to know what Blackstone was to realize that things were going seriously wrong.

Last year, Mark Alston, a real estate broker in Los Angeles, began noticing something strange happening. Home prices were rising. And they were rising fast -- up 20 percent between October 2012 and the same month this year. In a normal market, rising home prices would mean increased demand from homebuyers. But here was the unnerving thing: the homeownership rate was dropping, the first sign for Alston that the market was somehow out of whack.

The second sign was the buyers themselves.

"I went two years without selling to a black family, and that wasn't for lack of trying," says Alston, whose business is concentrated in inner-city neighborhoods where the majority of residents are African American and Hispanic. Instead, all his buyers -- every last one of them -- were besuited businessmen. And weirder yet, they were all paying in cash.

Between 2005 and 2009, the mortgage crisis, fueled by racially discriminatory lending practices, destroyed 53 percent of African American wealth and 66 percent of Hispanic wealth, figures that stagger the imagination. As a result, it's safe to say that few blacks or Hispanics today are buying homes outright, in cash. Blackstone, on the other hand, doesn't have a problem fronting the money, given its $3.6 billion credit line arranged by Deutsche Bank. This money has allowed it to outbid families who have to secure traditional financing. It's also paved the way for the company to purchase a lot of homes very quickly, shocking local markets and driving prices up in a way that pushes even more families out of the game.

"You can't compete with a company that's betting on speculative future value when they're playing with cash," says Alston. "It's almost like they planned this."

In hindsight, it's clear that the Great Recession fueled a terrific wealth and asset transfer away from ordinary Americans and to financial institutions. During that crisis, Americans lost trillions of dollars of household wealth when housing prices crashed, while banks seized about five million homes. But what's just beginning to emerge is how, as in the recession years, the recovery itself continues to drive the process of transferring wealth and power from the bottom to the top.

From 2009-2012, the top 1 percent of Americans captured 95 percent of income gains. Now, as the housing market rebounds, billions of dollars in recovered housing wealth are flowing straight to Wall Street instead of to families and communities. Since spring 2012, just at the time when Blackstone began buying foreclosed homes in bulk, an estimated $88 billion of housing wealth accumulation has gone straight to banks or institutional investors as a result of their residential property holdings, according to an analysis by TomDispatch. And it's a number that's likely to just keep growing.

"Institutional investors are siphoning the wealth and the ability for wealth accumulation out of underserved communities," says Henry Wade, founder of the Arizona Association of Real Estate Brokers.

But buying homes cheap and then waiting for them to appreciate in value isn't the only way Blackstone is making money on this deal. It wants your rental payment, too.

Securitizing Rentals

Wall Street's rental empire is entirely new. The single-family rental industry used to be the bailiwick of small-time mom-and-pop operations. But what makes this moment unprecedented is the financial alchemy that Blackstone added. In November, after many months of hype, Blackstone released history's first rated bond backed by securitized rental payments. And once investors tripped over themselves in a rush to get it, Blackstone's competitors announced that they, too, would develop similar securities as soon as possible.

Depending on whom you ask, the idea of bundling rental payments and selling them off to investors is either a natural evolution of the finance industry or a fire-breathing chimera.

"This is a new frontier," comments Ted Weinstein, a consultant in the real-estate-owned homes industry for 30 years. "It's something I never really would have dreamt of."

However, to anyone who went through the 2008 mortgage-backed-security crisis, this new territory will sound strangely familiar.

"It's just like a residential mortgage-backed security," said one hedge-fund investor whose company does business with Blackstone. When asked why the public should expect these securities to be safe, given the fact that risky mortgage-backed securities caused the 2008 collapse, he responded, "Trust me."

For Blackstone, at least, the logic is simple. The company wants money upfront to purchase more cheap, foreclosed homes before prices rise. So it's joined forces with JP Morgan, Credit Suisse, and Deutsche Bank to bundle the rental payments of 3,207 single-family houses and sell this bond to investors with mortgages on the underlying houses offered as collateral. This is, of course, just a test case for what could become a whole new industry of rental-backed securities.

Many major Wall Street banks are involved in the deal, according to a copy of the private pitch documents Blackstone sent to potential investors on October 31st, which was reviewed by TomDispatch. Deutsche Bank, JP Morgan, and Credit Suisse are helping market the bond. Wells Fargo is the certificate administrator. Midland Loan Services, a subsidiary of PNC Bank, is the loan servicer. (By the way, Deutsche Bank, JP Morgan Chase, Wells Fargo, and PNC Bank are all members of another clique: the list of banks foreclosing on the most families in 2013.)

According to interviews with economists, industry insiders, and housing activists, people are more or less holding their collective breath, hoping that what looks like a duck, swims like a duck, and quacks like a duck won't crash the economy the same way the last flock of ducks did.

"You kind of just hope they know what they're doing," says Dean Baker, an economist with the Center for Economic and Policy Research. "That they have provisions for turnover and vacancies. But have they done that? Have they taken the appropriate care? I certainly wouldn't count on it." The cash flow analysis in the documents sent to investors assumes that 95 percent of these homes will be rented at all times, at an average monthly rent of $1,312. It's an occupancy rate that real estate professionals describe as ambitious.

There's one significant way, however, in which this kind of security differs from its mortgage-backed counterpart. When banks repossess mortgaged homes as collateral, there is at least the assumption (often incorrect due to botched or falsified paperwork from the banks) that the homeowner has, indeed, defaulted on her mortgage. In this case, however, if a single home-rental bond blows up, thousands of families could be evicted, whether or not they ever missed a single rental payment.

"We could well end up in that situation where you get a lot of people getting evicted not because the tenants have fallen behind but because the landlords have fallen behind," says Baker.

Bugs in Blackstone's Housing Dreams

Whether these new securities are safe may boil down to the simple question of whether Blackstone proves to be a good property manager. Decent management practices will ensure high occupancy rates, predictable turnover, and increased investor confidence. Bad management will create complaints, investigations, and vacancies, all of which will increase the likelihood that Blackstone won't have the cash flow to pay investors back.

If you ask CaDonna Porter, a tenant in one of Blackstone's Invitation Homes properties in a suburb outside Atlanta, property management is exactly the skill that Blackstone lacks. "If I could shorten my lease -- I signed a two-year lease -- I definitely would," says Porter.

The cockroaches and fat water bugs were the first problem in the Invitation Homes rental that she and her children moved into in September. Porter repeatedly filed online maintenance requests that were canceled without anyone coming to investigate the infestation. She called the company's repairs hotline. No one answered.

The second problem arrived in an email with the subject line marked "URGENT." Invitation Homes had failed to withdraw part of Porter's November payment from her bank account, prompting the company to demand that she deliver the remaining payment in person, via certified funds, by five p.m. the following day or incur "the additional legal fee of $200 and dispossessory," according to email correspondences reviewed by TomDispatch.

Porter took off from work to deliver the money order in person, only to receive an email saying that the payment had been rejected because it didn't include the $200 late fee and an additional $75 insufficient funds fee. What followed were a maddening string of emails that recall the fraught and often fraudulent interactions between homeowners and mortgage-servicing companies. Invitation Homes repeatedly threatened to file for eviction unless Porter paid various penalty fees. She repeatedly asked the company to simply accept her month's payment and leave her alone.

"I felt really harassed. I felt it was very unjust," says Porter. She ultimately wrote that she would seek legal counsel, which caused Invitation Homes to immediately agree to accept the payment as "a one-time courtesy."

Porter is still frustrated by the experience -- and by the continued presence of the cockroaches. ("I put in another request today about the bugs, which will probably be canceled again.")

A recent Huffington Post investigation and dozens of online reviews written by Invitation Homes tenants echo Porter's frustrations. Many said maintenance requests went unanswered, while others complained that their spiffed-up houses actually had underlying structural issues.

There's also at least one documented case of Blackstone moving into murkier legal territory. This fall, the Orlando, Florida, branch of Invitation Homes appeared to mail forged eviction notices to a homeowner named Francisco Molina, according to the Orlando Sentinel. Delivered in letter-sized manila envelopes, the fake notices claimed that an eviction had been filed against Molina in court, although the city confirmed otherwise. The kicker is that Invitation Homes didn't even have the right to evict Molina, legally or otherwise. Blackstone's purchase of the house had been reversed months earlier, but the company had lost track of that information.

The Great Recession of 2016?

These anecdotal stories about Invitation Homes being quick to evict tenants may prove to be the trend rather than the exception, given Blackstone's underlying business model. Securitizing rental payments creates an intense pressure on the company to ensure that the monthly checks keep flowing. For renters, that may mean you either pay on the first of the month every month, or you're out.

Although Blackstone has issued only one rental-payment security so far, it already seems to be putting this strict protocol into place. In Charlotte, North Carolina, for example, the company has filed eviction proceedings against a full 10 percent of its renters, according to a report by the Charlotte Observer.

About 9 percent of Blackstone's properties, approximately 3,600 houses, are located in the Phoenix metro area. Most are in low- to middle-income neighborhoods.

Forty thousand homes add up to only a small percentage of the total national housing stock. Yet in the cities Blackstone has targeted most aggressively, the concentration of its properties is staggering. In Phoenix, Arizona, some neighborhoods have at least one, if not two or three, Blackstone-owned homes on just about every block.

This inundation has some concerned that the private equity giant, perhaps in conjunction with other institutional investors, will exercise undue influence over regional markets, pushing up rental prices because of a lack of competition. The biggest concern among many ordinary Americans, however, should be that, not too many years from now, this whole rental empire and its hot new class of securities might fail, sending the economy into an all-too-familiar tailspin.

"You're allowing Wall Street to control a significant sector of single-family housing," said Michael Donley, a resident of Chicago who has been investigating Blackstone's rapidly expanding presence in his neighborhood. "But is it sustainable?" he wondered. "It could all collapse in 2016, and you'll be worse off than in 2008."


Rebel0007 , says: December 19, 2019 at 6:39 am GMT

This is not surprising that this has happened. All of the de-regulation on Wall Street, lobbied for by Wall Street has allowed this to transpire.

Congress does not even read the bills that they sign into law, let alone write them! Many are written by ALEC American Legislative Exchange Council, the Chamber of Commerce, the Realtor's assosiation, the Medical Industrial Complex, public employee unions, and various other special interest groups!

Why is it a pressing issue to actively promote homosexuality? What is the point? That is really strange! There is a difference between not actively discriminating and actively promoting!

Are they trying to worsen the AIDS epidemic or lower the birth rate? It does not make sense to be actively promoting and encouraging homosexuality.

sally , says: December 19, 2019 at 7:18 am GMT
@Colin Wright There are many venture capitalist that are not Jewish.. Venture Capitalist don't always advertise their wealth. Not everybody in Wall Street or the City of London is Jewish.

I think it is important to separate the Jews from the Zionist , many in that small group (Zionist) are Jewish and Christian but most Jews and most Christians are neither Venture Capitalist nor Zionist. Time after time I have asked my Jewish friends are you are Zionist, and most say they do not really know what Zionism is? Zionism hosts many races among its members; in the states, Christian Zionism is big, maybe bigger even than Jewish Zionism.. see Christian Zionism : The Tragedy and the Turning: the cause of our Conflicts (on DVD) by http://www.Whit.org. .

Zionism is an economic system. Zionism is a winner take all system of Economics . Zionism is like an adult version of the game called King of the Mountain. In such a game, no one is allowed to play unless they first have sufficient resources to be counted, and are then willing to and believe they are personally capable of defeating the then residing well armed king (Oligarch). IMO, all Jews everywhere, would be well advised to avoid being labelled a Zionist<=hence the reason ?

Zionism is not the same as Judaism, its not a race, its not a religion, its not even a culture, it is an economic system with virus like attributes.

mark green , says: December 19, 2019 at 7:23 am GMT
@Lot You are quibbling. You are prevaricating. You are obfuscating.

Joyce has assembled a powerful case against a known cast of financial parasites. This phenomena is hardly new. It brings to mind another financial scandal of a generation ago that was chronicled in James B. Stewart's book 'Den of Thieves'.

The mega-wealthy swindlers of that era were also all Jews: Boesky, Siegel, Levine, Milken, among others. Some twenty years later, another Wall Street Jew, Bernie Madoff, succeeds in pulling off the biggest fraud in US history. There's a pattern here.

Yet all you can do, Lot, is deflect, denigrate, and deny.

Joyce is giving us more actual names. These are the actual perps as well as institutions they hide behind. These ruthless predators collude with one another as they exploit the labor of millions of gentiles worldwide, then shower Jewish causes and philanthropies with their loot. Their tribal avarice is revolting. And insatiable.

Do you deny this phenomena?

Is it all just another 'anti-Semitic canard'?

You even claim [Joyce] is

"retarded and highly uninformed".

Retarded?

He's brilliant and persuasive.

Uninformed?

He's erudite and scholarly.

You, Lot, are demonstrating again devious tribal dishonesty. It's glaring, it's shameful, and it's obvious. This is a trait I've observed in virtually all of your writings. You invariably deflect and deny. But Jewish criminality is real.

Joyce aptly concludes:

[T]he prosperity and influence of Zionist globalism rests to an overwhelming degree on the predations of the most successful and ruthless Jewish financial parasites.

So true. So tragically true.

Rebel0007 , says: December 19, 2019 at 7:28 am GMT
This is a Jewish conspiracy to make Jews look terrible. Congress should slam the breaks here. The de-regulation of the powerful combined with the over-regulation of the powerless is criminally wreckless. Kind of like the friends don't let friends drive drunk approach.

Congress slam the breaks, yeah right, that'll happen! Lol!

This won't end well.

HammerJack , says: December 19, 2019 at 7:30 am GMT
@Colin Wright Andrew Carnegie left behind institutions like Carnegie Hall, Carnegie-Mellon University, and over 2500 Free Libraries from coast to coast, in a time when very little was done to help what we now call the "underprivileged".

In fact, he gave away 90% of his massive fortune–about $75 Billion in current dollars. Funding, in the process, many charities, hospitals, museums, foundations and institutions of learning. He was a major benefactor of negro education.

He was a staunch anti-imperialist who believed America should concentrate its energies on peaceful endeavors rather than conquering and subduing far-off lands.

Although they are even more keen to put their names on things, today's robber barons leave behind mainly wreckage.

PetrOldSack , says: December 19, 2019 at 8:16 am GMT
@anon "Crowing on a pile of dung", global in scope, local and exclusive to thier own.
Ghali , says: December 19, 2019 at 8:46 am GMT
Jews are destroying the world. Everywhere they go, they leave behind nations in ruins. Look at Europe, Africa and the Americas, Jews have left their ugly footprints. Corruption, prostitution, drugs and human trafficking are their trade.
Just passing through , says: December 19, 2019 at 8:56 am GMT
@anon A combination of both I would say, although some would like to make it out that Anglo-Saxons were the epitome of honour, they too resorted to morallly abject tricks and swindles to acquire their wealth.

WASPs allowed Jews into their lands and both of them struck a sort of implicit contract to work together to loot the world, when the word had been sucked dry, the conflict between Jews and WASPs began and Hitler and the National Socialists were a last gasp attempt to save the WASP side from being beaten, in the end higher Jewish verbal IQ gave them the upper edge in the ability to trick people.

It is hard to feel sorry for WASPs, they struck a deal with the Jews centuries ago to work together and were backstabbed, what is happening to these Third World countries will now happen to WASP countries, it is poetic justice. Luckily the torch of civilisation will continue by way of East Asia and Eastern Europe, who were true conservatives in that all they wished was prosperity for their people in their own lands without any aggressive foreign policy moves.

Basically, WASPs thought that they could win in the end, but they were out Jew'd and now they are crying.

The one difference you will notice is that certain subsections of WASPs, notable the British, actually did build infrastructure in the countries they looted, this to me was borne out of a sense of guilt, so to be fair, WASPs were not as parasitic and ruthless as Jews.

But in the end, the more ruthless wins. To quote the Joker

You get what you fucking deserve

Sean , says: December 19, 2019 at 9:44 am GMT
@Lot Kyle Bass's fund is called 'Hayman', maybe because the MSM loathe the Bass family that fellow Texican Bass is not related to. They are not the only ones aware of the drawbacks of a name. Elliot is Singer's middle one.

The article bounces back and forth between two completely different fields: private equity and distressed debt funds

If someone owes you money and you cannot collect, you factor the account, (sell it on) and then people who are going to be a lot less pleasant about it will pay them a visit and have a 'talk' with them. While it is good to have a domestic bankruptcy regime in which innovation and entrepreneurship is encouraged– to the extent that people are not routinely gaming the system–I don't see why Argentina should benefit. Singer became notorious for what he did to Argentina after he bought their debt, and he is pretty upfront about not caring who objects. Puerto Rico is neither foreign or protected by Chapter 9 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code so it is a borderline case, which is probably why the people collecting that debt tried to hide who they were.

The way he took down Jonathan Bush and others led to Bloomberg dubbing Singer 'The World's Most Feared Investor'. Singer buys into companies where he sees the management as as failing to deliver maximum value to the shareholders, then applies pressure to raise the share price (in Bush's case extremely personal pressure) that often leads to the departure of the CEO and sale of the company. That immediate extra value for the shareholder Singer creates puts lots of working people out a job. Because of Singer and his imitators, CEO's are outsourcing and importing replacements for indigenous workers in those services that cannot be outsourced. All the while loath to foster innovation that could bring about long term growth, because that would interfere with squeezing out more and more shareholder value.

Singer is less like a vulture than a rogue elephant that is killing the breeding pair white rhinos on a game reserve, and they are going extinct. Well it's a good thing! Thanks to Singer et al (including Warren Buffett) Trump got elected. According to someone in jail with Epstein, he had an anecdote about Trump being asked by a French girl what 'white trash' was, and Trump replied 'It's me without the money'.

Trump is now essentially funded by three Jews -- Singer, Bernard Marcus, and Sheldon Adelson, together accounting for over $250 million in pro-Trump political money. In return, they want war with Iran.

All to the good. Iran won't leave Saudi Arabia (serious money) alone so Iran is going to have to be crushed as a threat to the Saud family like Saddam before it anyway. If the Jews think they are causing it, let 'em think so.

https://www.unz.com/pgiraldi/trump-creates-a-new-nation/
When the Israelis occupy nearly all of the West Bank with Donald Trump's approval and start "relocating" the existing population, who will be around to speak up? No one, as by that time saying nay to Israel will be a full-fledged hate crime and you can go to jail for doing so

Loudspeaker goes off " All Anti–Zionist Jews to Times Square ".

silviosilver , says: December 19, 2019 at 9:48 am GMT
@Colin Wright No judeophile, but it's 90% demagogic horsehit.

God forbid anybody should ever have to pay back money they borrow! Why, that's utterly Jewish!

These so-called "vulture" funds didn't originate the debt. They simply purchased already existing debt at deeply discounted prices either because the debt was already in default or was at imminent risk of defaulting, which is why the debt sells at a heavy discount, since existing debt holders are often happy to sell cheap and get something rather than hold on and risk getting nothing.

What Joyce zeroes in on is these vulture funds' willingness to use all legal avenues to force debtors to make good on their debts, including seizing the collateral the debtors pledged when they borrowed the money. Joyce chooses to characterize this practice as "Jewish," implying that gentile creditors would instead be overcome with compassion and let the debtors off the hook and wear the loss themselves.

What Joyce regards as a defect of "vulture" funds, others might regard as an benefit. The size of these funds, their legal expertise, and their political connections mean that borrowers can more successfully be held to account. If I owned, say, Puerto Rican debt in my retirement account, the chances that I could make Puerto Rico honor its obligations are much slimmer.

None of this is to suggest that finance, as we today know it, is perfect and that it couldn't be reformed in any way to make its operation more conducive to nationalistic social values, only that anti-cap ideologues like Joyce weave lurid tales of malfeasance out of completely humdrum market economics (which is precisely the same market economics that Tucker Carlson learned about too, btw).

J Adelman , says: December 19, 2019 at 9:53 am GMT
Mr. Joyce
Your obsession with us will prove to be your downfall.
Jewish people have always stood against tyranny against the working class, the poor and other people of color.
The phrases and catch words that you used to vilify Jews are in many cases pulled from the age old tropes used to demonize Jews for centuries and are anti-Semitic through and through. They can't be overlooked nor hidden by claims of legitimate political disagreements.
We know that it is not only the Jewish community that is at risk from unchecked antisemitism, but also other communities that white nationalists target.
I find it very offensive that people like you continue to demonize us for no reason.

I dare you to hold a debate with me on this so called "Jewish Influence".
I am not even hiding my name here.

[Jan 10, 2020] The Saker interviews Michael Hudson

Highly recommended!
Looks like Iran is Catch22 for the USA: it can destroy it, but only at the cost of losing empire and dollar hegemony...
Notable quotes:
"... The United States is now turning on the screws demanding that other countries sacrifice their growth in order to finance the U.S. unipolar empire. In effect, foreign countries are beginning to respond to the United States what the ten tribes of Israel said when they withdrew from the southern kingdom of Judah, whose king Rehoboam refused to lighten his demands (1 Kings 12). They echoed the cry of Sheba son of Bikri a generation earlier: "Look after your own house, O David!" The message is: What do other countries have to gain by remaining in the US unipolar neoliberalized world, as compared to using their own wealth to build up their own economies? It's an age-old problem. ..."
"... The dollar will still play a role in US trade and investment, but it will be as just another currency, held at arms length until it finally gives up its domineering attempt to strip other countries' wealth for itself. However, its demise may not be a pretty sight. ..."
"... Conflict in the ME has traditionally almost always been about oil [and of course Israel]. This situation is different. It is only partially about oil and Israel, but OVERWHHEMINGLY it is about the BRI. ..."
"... The salient factor as I see it is the Oil for Technology initiative that Iraq signed with China shortly before it slid into this current mess. ..."
"... This was a mechanism whereby China would buy Iraq oil and these funds would be used directly to fund infrastructure and self-sufficiency initiatives and technologies that would help to drag Iraq out of the complete disaster that the US war had created in this country. A key part of this would be that China would also make extra loans available at the same time to speed up this development. ..."
"... "Iraq's Finance Ministry that the country had started exporting 100,000 barrels per day (bpd) of crude oil to China in October as part of the 20-year oil-for-infrastructure deal agreed between the two countries." ..."
"... "For Iraq and Iran, China's plans are particularly far-reaching, OilPrice.com has been told by a senior oil industry figure who works closely with Iran's Petroleum Ministry and Iraq's Oil Ministry. China will begin with the oil and gas sector and work outwards from that central point. In addition to being granted huge reductions on buying Iranian oil and gas, China is to be given the opportunity to build factories in both Iran and Iraq – and build-out infrastructure, such as railways – overseen by its own management staff from Chinese companies. These are to have the same operational structure and assembly lines as those in China, so that they fit seamlessly into various Chinese companies' assembly lines' process for whatever product a particular company is manufacturing, whilst also being able to use the still-cheap labour available in both Iraq and Iraq." ..."
"... Hudson is so good. He's massively superior to most so called military analysts and alternative bloggers on the net. He can clearly see the over arching picture and how the military is used to protect and project it. The idea that the US is going to leave the middle east until they are forced to is so blind as to be ridiculous. ..."
"... I'd never thought of that "stationary aircraft carrier" comparison between Israel and the British, very apt. ..."
"... Trump et al assassinated someone who was on a diplomatic mission. This action was so far removed from acceptable behavior that it must have been considered to be "by any means and at all costs". ..."
"... This article, published by Strategic Culture, features a translation of Mahdi's speech to the Iraqi parliament in which he states that Trump threatened him with assassination and the US admitted to killing hundreds of demonstrators using Navy SEAL snipers. ..."
"... This description provided by Mr Hudson is no Moore than the financial basis behind the Cebrowski doctrine instituted on 9/11. https://www.voltairenet.org/article ..."
"... "The leading country breaking up US hegemony obviously is the United States itself. That is Trump's major contribution The United States is now turning on the screws demanding that other countries sacrifice their growth in order to finance the U.S. unipolar empire." ..."
"... The US govt. have long since paid off most every European politician. Thusly, Europe, as separate nations that should be remain still under the yolk of the US Financial/Political/Military power. ..."
"... In any event, it is the same today. Energy underlies, not only the military but, all of world civilization. Oil and gas are overwhelmingly the source of energy for the modern world. Without it, civilization collapses. Thus, he who controls oil (and gas) controls the world. ..."
"... the link between the US $$$ and Saudi Oil, is the absolute means of the American Dollar to reign complete. This payment system FEEDS both the US Military, but WALL STREET, hedge funds, the US/EU oligarchs – to name just a few entities. ..."
Jan 09, 2020 | thesaker.is

[this interview was made for the Unz Review ]

Introduction: After posting Michael Hudson's article " America Escalates its "Democratic" Oil War in the Near East " on the blog, I decided to ask Michael to reply to a few follow-up questions. Michael very kindly agreed. Please see our exchange below.

The Saker

-- -- -

The Saker: Trump has been accused of not thinking forward, of not having a long-term strategy regarding the consequences of assassinating General Suleimani. Does the United States in fact have a strategy in the Near East, or is it only ad hoc?

Michael Hudson: Of course American strategists will deny that the recent actions do not reflect a deliberate strategy, because their long-term strategy is so aggressive and exploitative that it would even strike the American public as being immoral and offensive if they came right out and said it.

President Trump is just the taxicab driver, taking the passengers he has accepted – Pompeo, Bolton and the Iran-derangement syndrome neocons – wherever they tell him they want to be driven. They want to pull a heist, and he's being used as the getaway driver (fully accepting his role). Their plan is to hold onto the main source of their international revenue: Saudi Arabia and the surrounding Near Eastern oil-export surpluses and money. They see the US losing its ability to exploit Russia and China, and look to keep Europe under its control by monopolizing key sectors so that it has the power to use sanctions to squeeze countries that resist turning over control of their economies and natural rentier monopolies to US buyers. In short, US strategists would like to do to Europe and the Near East just what they did to Russia under Yeltsin: turn over public infrastructure, natural resources and the banking system to U.S. owners, relying on US dollar credit to fund their domestic government spending and private investment.

This is basically a resource grab. Suleimani was in the same position as Chile's Allende, Libya's Qaddafi, Iraq's Saddam. The motto is that of Stalin: "No person, no problem."

The Saker: Your answer raises a question about Israel: In your recent article you only mention Israel twice, and these are only passing comments. Furthermore, you also clearly say the US Oil lobby as much more crucial than the Israel Lobby, so here is my follow-up question to you: On what basis have you come to this conclusion and how powerful do you believe the Israel Lobby to be compared to, say, the Oil lobby or the US Military-Industrial Complex? To what degree do their interests coincide and to what degree to they differ?

Michael Hudson: I wrote my article to explain the most basic concerns of U.S. international diplomacy: the balance of payments (dollarizing the global economy, basing foreign central bank savings on loans to the U.S. Treasury to finance the military spending mainly responsible for the international and domestic budget deficit), oil (and the enormous revenue produced by the international oil trade), and recruitment of foreign fighters (given the impossibility of drafting domestic U.S. soldiers in sufficient numbers). From the time these concerns became critical to today, Israel was viewed as a U.S. military base and supporter, but the U.S. policy was formulated independently of Israel.

I remember one day in 1973 or '74 I was traveling with my Hudson Institute colleague Uzi Arad (later a head of Mossad and advisor to Netanyahu) to Asia, stopping off in San Francisco. At a quasi-party, a U.S. general came up to Uzi and clapped him on the shoulder and said, "You're our landed aircraft carrier in the Near East," and expressed his friendship.

Uzi was rather embarrassed. But that's how the U.S. military thought of Israel back then. By that time the three planks of U.S. foreign policy strategy that I outlined were already firmly in place.

Of course Netanyahu has applauded U.S. moves to break up Syria, and Trump's assassination choice. But the move is a U.S. move, and it's the U.S. that is acting on behalf of the dollar standard, oil power and mobilizing Saudi Arabia's Wahabi army.

Israel fits into the U.S.-structured global diplomacy much like Turkey does. They and other countries act opportunistically within the context set by U.S. diplomacy to pursue their own policies. Obviously Israel wants to secure the Golan Heights; hence its opposition to Syria, and also its fight with Lebanon; hence, its opposition to Iran as the backer of Assad and Hezbollah. This dovetails with US policy.

But when it comes to the global and U.S. domestic response, it's the United States that is the determining active force. And its concern rests above all with protecting its cash cow of Saudi Arabia, as well as working with the Saudi jihadis to destabilize governments whose foreign policy is independent of U.S. direction – from Syria to Russia (Wahabis in Chechnya) to China (Wahabis in the western Uighur region). The Saudis provide the underpinning for U.S. dollarization (by recycling their oil revenues into U.S. financial investments and arms purchases), and also by providing and organizing the ISIS terrorists and coordinating their destruction with U.S. objectives. Both the Oil lobby and the Military-Industrial Complex obtain huge economic benefits from the Saudis.

Therefore, to focus one-sidedly on Israel is a distraction away from what the US-centered international order really is all about.

The Saker: In your recent article you wrote: " The assassination was intended to escalate America's presence in Iraq to keep control the region's oil reserves ." Others believe that the goal was precisely the opposite, to get a pretext to remove the US forces from both Iraq and Syria. What are your grounds to believe that your hypothesis is the most likely one?

Michael Hudson: Why would killing Suleimani help remove the U.S. presence? He was the leader of the fight against ISIS, especially in Syria. US policy was to continue using ISIS to permanently destabilize Syria and Iraq so as to prevent a Shi'ite crescent reaching from Iran to Lebanon – which incidentally would serve as part of China's Belt and Road initiative. So it killed Suleimani to prevent the peace negotiation. He was killed because he had been invited by Iraq's government to help mediate a rapprochement between Iran and Saudi Arabia. That was what the United States feared most of all, because it effectively would prevent its control of the region and Trump's drive to seize Iraqi and Syrian oil.

So using the usual Orwellian doublethink, Suleimani was accused of being a terrorist, and assassinated under the U.S. 2002 military Authorization Bill giving the President to move without Congressional approval against Al Qaeda. Trump used it to protect Al Qaeda's terrorist ISIS offshoots.

Given my three planks of U.S. diplomacy described above, the United States must remain in the Near East to hold onto Saudi Arabia and try to make Iraq and Syria client states equally subservient to U.S. balance-of-payments and oil policy.

Certainly the Saudis must realize that as the buttress of U.S. aggression and terrorism in the Near East, their country (and oil reserves) are the most obvious target to speed the parting guest. I suspect that this is why they are seeking a rapprochement with Iran. And I think it is destined to come about, at least to provide breathing room and remove the threat. The Iranian missiles to Iraq were a demonstration of how easy it would be to aim them at Saudi oil fields. What then would be Aramco's stock market valuation?

The Saker: In your article you wrote: " The major deficit in the U.S. balance of payments has long been military spending abroad. The entire payments deficit, beginning with the Korean War in 1950-51 and extending through the Vietnam War of the 1960s, was responsible for forcing the dollar off gold in 1971. The problem facing America's military strategists was how to continue supporting the 800 U.S. military bases around the world and allied troop support without losing America's financial leverage. " I want to ask a basic, really primitive question in this regard: how cares about the balance of payments as long as 1) the US continues to print money 2) most of the world will still want dollars. Does that not give the US an essentially "infinite" budget? What is the flaw in this logic?

Michael Hudson: The U.S. Treasury can create dollars to spend at home, and the Fed can increase the banking system's ability to create dollar credit and pay debts denominated in US dollars. But they cannot create foreign currency to pay other countries, unless they willingly accept dollars ad infinitum – and that entails bearing the costs of financing the U.S. balance-of-payments deficit, getting only IOUs in exchange for real resources that they sell to U.S. buyers.

This is the situation that arose half a century ago. The United States could print dollars in 1971, but it could not print gold.

In the 1920s, Germany's Reichsbank could print deutsche marks – trillions of them. When it came to pay Germany's foreign reparations debt, all it could do was to throw these D-marks onto the foreign exchange market. That crashed the currency's exchange rate, forcing up the price of imports proportionally and causing the German hyperinflation.

The question is, how many surplus dollars do foreign governments want to hold. Supporting the dollar standard ends up supporting U.S. foreign diplomacy and military policy. For the first time since World War II, the most rapidly growing parts of the world are seeking to de-dollarize their economies by reducing reliance on U.S. exports, U.S. investment, and U.S. bank loans. This move is creating an alternative to the dollar, likely to replace it with groups of other currencies and assets in national financial reserves.

The Saker: In the same article you also write: " So maintaining the dollar as the world's reserve currency became a mainstay of U.S. military spending. " We often hear people say that the dollar is about to tank and that as soon as that happens, then the US economy (and, according to some, the EU economy too) will collapse. In the intelligence community there is something called tracking the "indicators and warnings". My question to you is: what are the economic "indicators and warnings" of a possible (probable?) collapse of the US dollar followed by a collapse of the financial markets most tied to the Dollar? What shall people like myself (I am an economic ignoramus) keep an eye on and look for?

Michael Hudson: What is most likely is a slow decline, largely from debt deflation and cutbacks in social spending, in the Eurozone and US economies. Of course, the decline will force the more highly debt-leveraged companies to miss their bond payments and drive them into insolvency. That is the fate of Thatcherized economies. But it will be long and painfully drawn out, largely because there is little left-wing socialist alternative to neoliberalism at present.

Trump's protectionist policies and sanctions are forcing other countries to become self-reliant and independent of US suppliers, from farm crops to airplanes and military arms, against the US threat of a cutoff or sanctions against repairs, spare parts and servicing. Sanctioning Russian agriculture has helped it become a major crop exporter, and to become much more independent in vegetables, dairy and cheese products. The US has little to offer industrially, especially given the fact that its IT communications are stuffed with US spyware.

Europe therefore is facing increasing pressure from its business sector to choose the non-US economic alliance that is growing more rapidly and offers a more profitable investment market and more secure trade supplier. Countries will turn as much as possible (diplomatically as well as financially and economically) to non-US suppliers because the United States is not reliable, and because it is being shrunk by the neoliberal policies supported by Trump and the Democrats alike. A byproduct probably will be a continued move toward gold as an alternative do the dollar in settling balance-of-payments deficits.

The Saker: Finally, my last question: which country out there do you see as the most capable foe of the current US-imposed international political and economic world order? whom do you believe that US Deep State and the Neocons fear most? China? Russia? Iran? some other country? How would you compare them and on the basis of what criteria?

Michael Hudson: The leading country breaking up US hegemony obviously is the United States itself. That is Trump's major contribution. He is uniting the world in a move toward multi-centrism much more than any ostensibly anti-American could have done. And he is doing it all in the name of American patriotism and nationalism – the ultimate Orwellian rhetorical wrapping!

Trump has driven Russia and China together with the other members of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO), including Iran as observer. His demand that NATO join in US oil grabs and its supportive terrorism in the Near East and military confrontation with Russia in Ukraine and elsewhere probably will lead to European "Ami go home" demonstrations against NATO and America's threat of World War III.

No single country can counter the U.S. unipolar world order. It takes a critical mass of countries. This already is taking place among the countries that you list above. They are simply acting in their own common interest, using their own mutual currencies for trade and investment. The effect is an alternative multilateral currency and trading area.

The United States is now turning on the screws demanding that other countries sacrifice their growth in order to finance the U.S. unipolar empire. In effect, foreign countries are beginning to respond to the United States what the ten tribes of Israel said when they withdrew from the southern kingdom of Judah, whose king Rehoboam refused to lighten his demands (1 Kings 12). They echoed the cry of Sheba son of Bikri a generation earlier: "Look after your own house, O David!" The message is: What do other countries have to gain by remaining in the US unipolar neoliberalized world, as compared to using their own wealth to build up their own economies? It's an age-old problem.

The dollar will still play a role in US trade and investment, but it will be as just another currency, held at arms length until it finally gives up its domineering attempt to strip other countries' wealth for itself. However, its demise may not be a pretty sight.

The Saker: I thank you very much for your time and answers! ­


Col...'the farmer from NZ' on January 09, 2020 , · at 5:19 pm EST/EDT

What a truly superb interview!

Another one that absolutely stands for me out is the below link to a recent interview of Hussein Askary.

As I wrote a few days ago IMO this too is a wonderful insight into the utterly complicated dynamics of the tinderbox that the situation in Iran and Iraq has become.

Conflict in the ME has traditionally almost always been about oil [and of course Israel]. This situation is different. It is only partially about oil and Israel, but OVERWHHEMINGLY it is about the BRI.

The salient factor as I see it is the Oil for Technology initiative that Iraq signed with China shortly before it slid into this current mess.

This was a mechanism whereby China would buy Iraq oil and these funds would be used directly to fund infrastructure and self-sufficiency initiatives and technologies that would help to drag Iraq out of the complete disaster that the US war had created in this country. A key part of this would be that China would also make extra loans available at the same time to speed up this development.

In essence, this would enable the direct and efficient linking of Iraq into the BRI project. Going forward the economic gains and the political stability that could come out of this would be a completely new paradigm in the recovery of Iraq both economically and politically. Iraq is essential for a major part of the dynamics of the BRI because of its strategic location and the fact that it could form a major hub in the overall network.

It absolutely goes without saying that the AAA would do everything the could to wreck this plan. This is their playbook and is exactly what they have done. The moronic and extraordinarily impulsive Trump subsequently was easily duped into being a willing and idiotic accomplice in this plan.

The positive in all of this is that this whole scheme will backfire spectacularly for the perpetrators and will more than likely now speed up the whole process in getting Iraq back on track and working towards stability and prosperity.

Please don't anyone try to claim that Trump is part of any grand plan nothing could be further from the truth he is nothing more than a bludgeoning imbecile foundering around, lashing out impulsively indiscriminately. He is completely oblivious and ignorant as to the real picture.

I urge everyone involved in this Saker site to put aside an hour and to listen very carefully to Askary's insights. This is extremely important and could bring more clarity to understanding the situation than just about everything else you have read put together. There is hope, and Askary highlights the huge stakes that both Russia and China have in the region.

This is a no brainer. This is the time for both Russia and China to act and to decisively. They must cooperate in assisting both Iraq and Iran to extract themselves from the current quagmire the one that the vicious Hegemon so cruelly and thoughtlessly tossed them into.

Cheers from the south seas
Col

And the link to the Askary interview: . https://youtu.be/UD1hWq6KD44

Col...'the farmer from NZ' on January 09, 2020 , · at 8:22 pm EST/EDT
Also interesting is what Simon Watkins reports in his recent article entitled "Is Iraq About To Become A Chinese Client State?"

To quote from the article:

"Iraq's Finance Ministry that the country had started exporting 100,000 barrels per day (bpd) of crude oil to China in October as part of the 20-year oil-for-infrastructure deal agreed between the two countries."

and

"For Iraq and Iran, China's plans are particularly far-reaching, OilPrice.com has been told by a senior oil industry figure who works closely with Iran's Petroleum Ministry and Iraq's Oil Ministry. China will begin with the oil and gas sector and work outwards from that central point. In addition to being granted huge reductions on buying Iranian oil and gas, China is to be given the opportunity to build factories in both Iran and Iraq – and build-out infrastructure, such as railways – overseen by its own management staff from Chinese companies. These are to have the same operational structure and assembly lines as those in China, so that they fit seamlessly into various Chinese companies' assembly lines' process for whatever product a particular company is manufacturing, whilst also being able to use the still-cheap labour available in both Iraq and Iraq."

and

"The second key announcement in this vein made last week from Iraq was that the Oil Ministry has completed the pre-qualifying process for companies interested in participating in the Iraqi-Jordanian oil pipeline project. The U$5 billion pipeline is aimed at carrying oil produced from the Rumaila oilfield in Iraq's Basra Governorate to the Jordanian port of Aqaba, with the first phase of the project comprising the installation of a 700-kilometre-long pipeline with a capacity of 2.25 million bpd within the Iraqi territories (Rumaila-Haditha). The second phase includes installing a 900-kilometre pipeline in Jordan between Haditha and Aqaba with a capacity of 1 million bpd. Iraq's Oil Minister – for the time being, at least – Thamir Ghadhban added that the Ministry has formed a team to prepare legal contracts, address financial issues and oversee technical standards for implementing the project, and that May will be the final month in which offers for the project from the qualified companies will be accepted and that the winners will be announced before the end of this year. Around 150,000 barrels of the oil from Iraq would be used for Jordan's domestic needs, whilst the remainder would be exported through Aqaba to various destinations, generating about US$3 billion a year in revenues to Jordan, with the rest going to Iraq. Given that the contractors will be expected to front-load all of the financing for the projects associated with this pipeline, Baghdad expects that such tender offers will be dominated by Chinese and Russian companies, according to the Iran and Iraq source."

Cheers
Col

And the link https://oilprice.com/Geopolitics/Middle-East/Is-Iraq-About-To-Become-A-Chinese-Client-State.html#

Anonymouse on January 09, 2020 , · at 5:20 pm EST/EDT
Hudson is so good. He's massively superior to most so called military analysts and alternative bloggers on the net. He can clearly see the over arching picture and how the military is used to protect and project it. The idea that the US is going to leave the middle east until they are forced to is so blind as to be ridiculous.

They will not sacrifice the (free) oil until booted out by a coalition of Arab countries threatening to over run them and that is why the dollar hegemonys death will be slow, long and drawn out and they will do anything, any dirty trick in the book, to prevent Arab/Persian unity. Unlike many peoples obsession with Israel and how important they feel themselves to be I think Hudson is correct again. They are the middle eastern version of the British – a stationary aircraft carrier who will allow themselves to be used and abused whilst living under the illusion they are major players. They aren't. They're bit part players in decline, subservient to the great dollar and oil pyramid scheme that keeps America afloat. If you want to beat America you have to understand the big scheme, that and the utter insanity that backs it up. It is that insanity of the leites, the inability to allow themselves to be 'beaten' that will keep nuclear exchange as a real possibility over the next 10 to 15 years. Unification is the only thing that can stop it and trying to unite so many disparate countries (as the Russians are trying to do despite multiple provocations) is where the future lies and why it will take so long. It is truly breath taking in such a horrific way, as Hudson mentions, that to allow the world to see its 'masters of the universe' pogram to be revealed:

"Of course American strategists will deny that the recent actions do not reflect a deliberate strategy, because their long-term strategy is so aggressive and exploitative that it would even strike the American public as being immoral and offensive if they came right out and said it."

Would be to allow it to be undermined at home and abroad. God help us all.

Little Black Duck on January 09, 2020 , · at 7:01 pm EST/EDT
They're bit part players in decline, subservient to the great dollar and oil pyramid scheme that keeps America afloat.

So who owns the dollar? And who owns the oil companies?

Osori on January 09, 2020 , · at 8:06 pm EST/EDT
I'd never thought of that "stationary aircraft carrier" comparison between Israel and the British, very apt.
Zachary Smith on January 09, 2020 , · at 9:53 pm EST/EDT
Clever would be a better word. Looking at my world globe, I see Italy, Greece, and Turkey on that end of the Mediterranean. Turkey has been in NATO since 1952. Crete and Cyprus are also right there. Doesn't Hudson own a globe or regional map?

That a US Admiral would be gushing about the Apartheid state 7 years after the attempted destruction of the USS Liberty is painful to consider. I'd like to disbelieve the story, but it's quite likely there were a number of high-ranking ***holes in a Naval Uniform.

44360 on January 09, 2020 , · at 5:34 pm EST/EDT
The world situation reminds us of the timeless fable by Aesop of The North Wind and the Sun.

Trump et al assassinated someone who was on a diplomatic mission. This action was so far removed from acceptable behavior that it must have been considered to be "by any means and at all costs".

Perhaps the most potent weapon Iran or anyone else has at this critical juncture, is not missiles, but diplomacy.

Ahmed on January 09, 2020 , · at 5:37 pm EST/EDT
"Therefore, to focus one-sidedly on Israel is a distraction away from what the US-centered international order really is all about."

Thank you for saying this sir. In the US and around the world many people become obsessively fixated in seeing a "jew" or zionist behind every bush. Now the Zionists are certinly an evil, blood thirsty bunch, and certainly deserve the scorn of the world, but i feel its a cop out sometimes. A person from the US has a hard time stomaching the actions of their country, so they just hoist all the unpleasentries on to the zionists. They put it all on zionisim, and completly fail to mention imperialism. I always switced back and forth on the topic my self. But i cant see how a beachead like the zionist state, a stationary carrier, can be bigger than the empire itself. Just look at the major leaders in the resistance groups, the US was always seen as the ultimate obstruction, while israel was seen as a regional obstruction. Like sayyed hassan nasrallah said in his recent speech about the martyrs, that if the US is kicked out, the Israelis might just run away with out even fighting. I hate it when people say "we are in the middle east for israel" when it can easily be said that "israel is still in the mid east because of the US." If the US seized to exist today, israel would fall rather quickly. If israel fell today the US would still continue being an imperalist, bloodthirsty entity.

Azorka1861 on January 09, 2020 , · at 5:57 pm EST/EDT
The Deeper Story behind the Assassination of Soleimani

This article, published by Strategic Culture, features a translation of Mahdi's speech to the Iraqi parliament in which he states that Trump threatened him with assassination and the US admitted to killing hundreds of demonstrators using Navy SEAL snipers.

https://www.veteranstoday.com/2020/01/08/vital-the-deeper-story-behind-the-assassination-of-soleimani/

..

Nils on January 09, 2020 , · at 6:05 pm EST/EDT
This description provided by Mr Hudson is no Moore than the financial basis behind the Cebrowski doctrine instituted on 9/11. https://www.voltairenet.org/article

I wish the Saker had asked Mr Hudson about some crucial recent events to get his opinion with regards to US foreign policy. Specifically, how does the emergence of cryptocurrency relate to dollar finance and the US grand strategy? A helpful tool for the hegemon or the emergence of a new currency that prevents unlimited currency printing? Finally, what is global warming and the associated carbon credit system? The next planned model of continuing global domination and balance of payments? Or true organic attempt at fair energy production and management?

Much thanks for this interview, Saker

Col...'the farmer from NZ' on January 09, 2020 , · at 6:26 pm EST/EDT
With all due respect, these are huge questions in themselves and perhaps could to be addressed in separate interviews. IMO it doesn't always work that well to try to cover too much ground in just one giant leap.

Regards
Col

Mike from Jersey on January 09, 2020 , · at 7:26 pm EST/EDT
I have never understood the Cebrowski doctrine. How does the destruction of Middle Eastern state structures allow the US to control Middle East Oil? The level of chaos generated by such an act would seem to prevent anyone from controlled the oil.
Outlaw Historian on January 09, 2020 , · at 7:48 pm EST/EDT
Dr. Hudson often appears on RT's "Keiser Report" where he covers many contemporary topics with its host Max Keiser. Many of the shows transcripts are available at Hudson's website . Indeed, after the two Saker items, you'll find three programs on the first page. Using the search function at his site, you'll find the two articles he's written that deal with bitcoin and cryptocurrencies, although I think he's been more specific in the TV interviews.

As for this Q&A, its an A+. Hudson's 100% correct to playdown the Zionist influence given the longstanding nature of the Outlaw US Empire's methods that began well before the rise of the Zionist Lobby, which in reality is a recycling of aid dollars back to Congress in the form of bribes.

RR on January 09, 2020 , · at 7:59 pm EST/EDT
Nils: Good Article. The spirit of Nihilism.
Quote from Neocon Michael Ladeen.

"Creative destruction is our middle name, both within our own society and abroad. We tear down the old order every day, from business to science, literature, art, architecture, and cinema to politics and the law. Our enemies have always hated this whirlwind of energy and creativity, which menaces their traditions (whatever they may be) and shames them for their inability to keep pace. Seeing America undo traditional societies, they fear us, for they do not wish to be undone. They cannot feel secure so long as we are there, for our very existence -- our existence, not our politics -- threatens their legitimacy. They must attack us in order to survive, just as we must destroy them to advance our historic mission."

Frank on January 09, 2020 , · at 10:27 pm EST/EDT
@NILS As far as crypto currency goes it is a brilliant idea in concept. But since during the Bush years we have been shown multiple times, who actually owns [and therefore controls] the internet. Many times now we have also been informed that through the monitoring capability's of our defense agency's, they are recording every key stroke. IMO, with the flip of a switch, we can shut down the internet. At the very least, that would stop us from being able to trade in crypto, but they have e-files on each of us. They know our passwords, or can easily access them. That does not give me confidence in e=currency during a teotwawki situation.
Anonymous on January 09, 2020 , · at 6:34 pm EST/EDT
A truly superb interview, thanks Michael Hudson.
David on January 09, 2020 , · at 6:39 pm EST/EDT
One thing that troubles me about the petrodollar thesis is that ANNUAL trade in oil is about 2 trillion DAILY trade in $US is 4 trillion. I can well believe the US thinks oil is the bedrock if dollar hegemony but is it? I see no alternative to US dollar hegemony.
Mike from Jersey on January 09, 2020 , · at 7:17 pm EST/EDT
Excellent article.

The lines that really got my attention were these:

"The leading country breaking up US hegemony obviously is the United States itself. That is Trump's major contribution The United States is now turning on the screws demanding that other countries sacrifice their growth in order to finance the U.S. unipolar empire."

That is so completely true. I have wondered why – to date – there had not been more movement by Europe away from the United States. But while reading the article the following occurred to me. Maybe Europe is awaiting the next U.S. election. Maybe they hope that a new president (someone like Biden) might allow Europe to keep more of the "spoils."

If that is true, then a re-election of Trump will probably send Europe fleeing for the exits. The Europeans will be cutting deals with Russia and China like the store is on fire.

Rubicon on January 09, 2020 , · at 10:22 pm EST/EDT
The critical player in forming the EU WAS/IS the US financial Elites. Yes, they had many ultra powerful Europeans, especially Germany, but it was the US who initiated the EU.

Purpose? For the US Financial Powerhouses & US politicians to "take Europe captive." Notice the similarities: the EU has its Central Bank who communicates with the private Banksters of the FED. Much austerity has ensued, especially in Southern nations: Greece, Italy, etc. Purpose: to smash unions, worker's pay, eliminate unions, and basically allowing US/EU Financial capital to buy out Italy, most of Greece, and a goodly section of Spain and Portugal.

The US govt. have long since paid off most every European politician. Thusly, Europe, as separate nations that should be remain still under the yolk of the US Financial/Political/Military power.

Craig Mouldey on January 09, 2020 , · at 8:19 pm EST/EDT
I have a hard time wrapping my head around this but it sounds like he is saying that the U.S. has a payment deficit problem which is solved by stealing the world's oil supplies. To do this they must have a powerful, expensive military. But it is primarily this military which is the main cause of the balance deficit. So it is an eternally fuelled problem and solution. If I understand this, what it actually means is that we all live on a plantation as slaves and everything that is happening is for the benefit of the few wealthy billionaires. And they intend to turn the entire world into their plantation of slaves. They may even let you live for a while longer.
Mike from Jersey on January 09, 2020 , · at 9:25 pm EST/EDT
Actually, oil underlies everything.

I didn't know this until I read a history of World War I.

As you know, World War One was irresolvable, murderous, bloody trench warfare. People would charge out of the trenches trying to overrun enemy positions only to be cutdown by the super weapon of the day – the machine gun. It was an unending bloody stalemate until the development of the tank. Tanks were immune to machine gun fire coming from the trenches and could overrun enemy positions. In the aftermath of that war, it became apparently that mechanization had become crucial to military supremacy. In turn, fuel was crucial to mechanization. Accordingly, in the Sykes Picot agreement France and Britain divided a large amount of Middle Eastern oil between themselves in order to assure military dominance. (The United States had plenty of their own oil at that time.)

In any event, it is the same today. Energy underlies, not only the military but, all of world civilization. Oil and gas are overwhelmingly the source of energy for the modern world. Without it, civilization collapses. Thus, he who controls oil (and gas) controls the world.

That is one third of the story. The second third is this.

Up till 1971, the United States dollar was the most trusted currency in the world. The dollar was backed by gold and lots and lots of it. Dollars were in fact redeemable in gold. However, due to Vietnam War, the United States started running huge balance of payments deficits. Other countries – most notably France under De Gaulle – started cashing in dollars in exchange for that gold. Gold started flooding out of the United States. At that point Nixon took the United States off of the gold standard. Basically stating that the dollar was no longer backed by gold and dollars could not be redeemed for gold. That caused an international payments problem. People would no longer accept dollars as payment since the dollar was not backed up by anything. The American economy was in big trouble since they were running deficits and people would no longer take dollars on faith.

To fix the problem, Henry Kissinger convinced the Saudis to agree to only accept dollars in payment for oil – no matter who was the buyer. That meant that nations throughout the world now needed dollars in order to pay for their energy needs. Due to this, the dollars was once again the most important currency in the world since – as noted above – energy underlies everything in modern industrial cultures. Additionally, since dollars were now needed throughout the world, it became common to make all trades for any product in highly valued dollars. Everyone needed dollars for every thing, oil or not.

At that point, the United States could go on printing dollars and spending them since a growing world economy needed more and more dollars to buy oil as well as to trade everything else.

That leads to the third part of the story. In order to convince the Saudis to accept only dollars in payments for oil (and to have the Saudis strong arm other oil producers to do the same) Kissinger promised to protect the brutal Saudi regime's hold on power against a restive citizenry and also to protect the Saudi's against other nations. Additionally, Kissinger made an implicit threat that if the Saudi's did not agree, the US would come in and just take their oil. The Saudis agreed.

Thus, the three keys to dominance in the modern world are thus: oil, dollars and the military.

Thus, Hudson ties in the three threads in his interview above. Oil, Dollars, Military. That is what holds the empire together.

Rubicon on January 09, 2020 , · at 10:26 pm EST/EDT
Thank you for thinking through this. Yes, the link between the US $$$ and Saudi Oil, is the absolute means of the American Dollar to reign complete. This payment system FEEDS both the US Military, but WALL STREET, hedge funds, the US/EU oligarchs – to name just a few entities.
Stanislaw Janowicz on January 09, 2020 , · at 8:58 pm EST/EDT
I should make one note only to this. That "no man, no problem" was Stalin's motto is a myth. He never said that. It was invented by a writer Alexei Rybnikov and inserted in his book "The Children of Arbat".
Greg Horrall on January 09, 2020 , · at 9:42 pm EST/EDT
Wow! Absolutely beautiful summation of the ultimate causes that got us where we are and, if left intact, will get us to where we're going!

So, the dreamer says: If only we could throw-off our us-vs-them BS political-economic ideology & religious doctrine-faith issues, put them into live-and-let-live mode, and see that we are all just humans fighting over this oil resource to which our modern economy (way of life) is addicted, then we might be able to hammer out some new rules for interacting, for running an earth-resource sustainable and fair global economy We do at least have the technology to leave behind our oil addiction, but the political-economic will still is lacking. How much more of the current insanity must we have before we get that will? Will we get it before it's too late?

Only if we, a sufficient majority from the lowest economic classes to the top elites and throughout all nations, are able to psychologically-spiritually internalize the two principles of Common Humanity and Spaceship Earth soon enough, will we stop our current slide off the cliff into modern economic collapse and avert all the pain and suffering that's already now with us and that will intensify.

The realist says we're not going to stop that slide and it's the only way we're going to learn, if we are indeed ever going to learn.

Ann Watson on January 09, 2020 , · at 10:42 pm EST/EDT
So now we know why Michael Hudson avoids the Israel involvment – Like Pepe.
Лишний Человек on January 09, 2020 , · at 11:02 pm EST/EDT
Thank you for this excellent interview. You ask the kind of questions that we would all like to ask. It's regrettable that Chalmers Johnson isn't still alive. I believe that you and he would have a lot in common.

Naxos has produced an incredible, unabridged cd audiobook of Gibbon's Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. One of Gibbon's observations really resonates today: "Assassination is the last resource of cowards". Thanks again.

[Jan 09, 2020] An increase in sales of riskier corporate debt poses a "financial stability concern"

www.moonofalabama.org
Jan 09, 2020 | www.facebook.com

This is specially interesting:

Just two companies in the US -- Johnson & Johnson and Microsoft -- still have a pristine, triple-A rating , the researchers noted. While sales of both the safest, triple-A rated bonds and the riskiest "high-yield" bonds have been declining over the past five years, there has been a dramatic rise in the amount of triple-B rated bonds that sit on the lowest rung of the investment-grade ladder, just above high-yield.

You don't need to be Warren Buffet to know J&J and Microsoft are blue chips. The problem is: how much rotten are the triple B? Financial expertise has degenerated to who know which is the not-so-rotten-papers instead of knowing which are the most promising investments for the progress of humanity, free market etc. etc. Having a guy spying for you behind the scenes became more valuable than being a rocket engineer with a suma cum laude at MIT.

Russia, Iran and China are doing well in biding their time. The whole capitalist system is ripe for another "corrective" recession somewhere between 2020-2023.

--/-

2. The giant of giants of the Asian Paper Tiger is in trouble:

One-third drop in Samsung's Q4 operating profit

This is the funny part:

Samsung was hit by a series of difficulties in 2019, with chip stockpiles bloating and prices falling

[...]

But the figures beat expectations, analysts said, with chip demand starting to improve and strong smartphone sales.

So, the Samsung's profit took a nose dive and still this was good news?

Who cares about "expectations"? In capitalism, either you're profiting enough or you aren't. You can't just move the goal posts like that.

If it happened to some SOE in China, those "experts" would've already be souding the trumpets of Apocalypse, calling for a complete privatization of the system and the mass suicide of every CCP member - you know, because "the system doesn't work".

--/-

3. Speaking of a system that doesn't work:

India facing major recession: Nobel laureate

Those two Rijksbank laureates (there's no Nobel Prize of Economics, that's a fantasy term) are two pseudo-scientists, but the numbers are too clear:

India's gross domestic product has been on a downward spiral for six consecutive quarters, finishing at 4.5% in the September 2019 quarter. Private consumption, which contributes about 60% to the gross domestic product, is growing at 5.7% in 2019-20, much below the rate for the previous financial year when it grew at 8.1%.

The National Statistical office has now forecast that India's gross domestic product growth will hit a 11-year low of 5% in 2019-20, down from 6.8% in the previous year.

People who are reading this blog for enough time know that India cooks the books, essentially doubling its own GDP growth figures. That means a 5% GDP growth in India actually means 2.5% (maybe even 2.0%).

India promised the world and its own people it would become a superpower by 2020. They have 357 days left.

--/-

4. About Australia's raging bushfires:

Raging bushfires expose multiple governance woes of Australia

Yep. The Chinese agree with me: climate change was the main factor responsible for the scale, durability and vastness of this year's epic bushfires in Australia. Drier eucalyptus forests turn even a kid with a matchstick into a deadly eco-terrorist; a lightning bolt into a massive volcanic eruption.

The Australian government itself agrees with me and the Chinese:

Australian fires: Victorians urged to leave amid fears 'heat spike' will cause bushfires to merge

Emphasis on "heat spike".

Bushfires are natural to the Australian ecosystem, and they happen every summer - what is up to debate is the scale and vastness of this years' bushfires. The Australian right-wing, backed up by the Murdoch media, should not try to pull a Nero and try to blame a random group of innefective ecologists in a shameful witchhunt.

--/-

5. Age segregation in the UK seems to be serious business:

'Age apartheid': Britain is one of world's most segregated countries – report

Britain is one of the world's most age-segregated nations, with the generational divide increasing over the last decade, according to a new report which calls for urgent action to address the "age apartheid" dividing the country. [...] According to the report, divisions have increased as a result of the housing market, with the concentration of wealth now firmly in the hands of older people. They tend to live in towns and rural areas, while the young are sucked in by city life.

Nice curiosity if you're into that sociology stuff.

--/-

6. Japanification of the USA continues:

Why Are Young Americans Killing Themselves? Suicide is now their second-leading cause of death.

Suicide in Japan already is (it is for some decades now) the main cause of death among young adults. The USA is quickly catching up.

Before blaming China for exports of Fentanyl, the Americans (and Trump) should look themselves in the mirror first.

Posted by: vk | Jan 9 2020 16:56 utc | 15

[Jan 09, 2020] Protecting the Dollar Standard is the main national security objective of the USA

Jan 09, 2020 | www.moonofalabama.org

vk , Jan 9 2020 19:35 utc | 43

@ Posted by: Cynica | Jan 9 2020 19:20 utc | 38

I agree that, today, protecting the Dollar Standard is the main national security objective of the USA. That is so because issuing the universal fiat currency is a conditio sine qua non of keeping the financial superpower status.

I also agree that the Petrodollar is the base that sustains the Dollar Standard.

But I disagree with the rest:

1) the Cold War didn't begin in 1945, but in 1917 - right after the October Revolution. There's overwhelming documental evidence of that and, in fact, the years of 1943-1945 was the only break it had. Until Stalingrad, the Western allies were still waiting to see if the USSR and the Third Reich could still mutually anihilate themselves (yes, it is a myth the Allies were really allies from 1939, but that's not a very simple demonstration);

2) in the aftermath of WWII, the USA emerged as both the industrial and financial superpower in the capitalist world (i.e. the West). But this was an accidental - and very unlikely - alignment of events. The USA always had imperial ambitions from its foundation (the Manifest Destiny), but there's no evidence it was scheming to dominate the world before 1945. The American ascension was more a fruit of the European imperial superpowers destroying themselves than by any American (or Jewish, as the far-right likes to speculate) design;

3) the USSR had nothing to do with Bretton Woods. BW was a strictly capitalist affair. And it could not be any difference: the USSR was a socialist country, therefore, it didn't have money-capital (money in the capitalist system has three functions: reserve of value, means of exchange and means of payment). The only way it had to trade with the capitalist half of the world was to exchange essential commodities (oil) for hard currency, with which it bought what it needed for its own development (mainly, high technological machines which it could copy and later develop on). So, the USSR didn't "balk" at BW - it was literally impossible for it to pertain to the agreement.


Cynica , Jan 9 2020 19:20 utc | 39

@Kali #22

Michael Hudson is not the only one who's come to understand that maintaining the reserve-currency status of the US dollar (the "dollar hegemony") is the primary goal of US foreign policy. Indeed, it's been the primary goal of US foreign policy since the end of World War II, when the Bretton Woods agreement was put into effect. Notably, the Soviets ended up balking at that agreement, and the Cold War did not start until afterwards. This means that even the Cold War was not really about ideology - it was about money.

It's also important to note that the point of the "petrodollar" is to ensure that petroleum - one of the most globally traded commodities and a commodity that's fundamental to the global economy - is traded primarily, if not exclusively, in terms of the US dollar. Ensuring that as much global/international trade happens in US dollars helps ensure that the US dollar keeps its reserve-currency status, because it raises the foreign demand for US dollars.

vk , Jan 9 2020 19:35 utc | 43
@ Posted by: Cynica | Jan 9 2020 19:20 utc | 38

I agree that, today, protecting the Dollar Standard is the main national security objective of the USA. That is so because issuing the universal fiat currency is a conditio sine qua non of keeping the financial superpower status.

I also agree that the Petrodollar is the base that sustains the Dollar Standard.

But I disagree with the rest:

1) the Cold War didn't begin in 1945, but in 1917 - right after the October Revolution. There's overwhelming documental evidence of that and, in fact, the years of 1943-1945 was the only break it had. Until Stalingrad, the Western allies were still waiting to see if the USSR and the Third Reich could still mutually anihilate themselves (yes, it is a myth the Allies were really allies from 1939, but that's not a very simple demonstration);

2) in the aftermath of WWII, the USA emerged as both the industrial and financial superpower in the capitalist world (i.e. the West). But this was an accidental - and very unlikely - alignment of events. The USA always had imperial ambitions from its foundation (the Manifest Destiny), but there's no evidence it was scheming to dominate the world before 1945. The American ascension was more a fruit of the European imperial superpowers destroying themselves than by any American (or Jewish, as the far-right likes to speculate) design;

3) the USSR had nothing to do with Bretton Woods. BW was a strictly capitalist affair. And it could not be any difference: the USSR was a socialist country, therefore, it didn't have money-capital (money in the capitalist system has three functions: reserve of value, means of exchange and means of payment). The only way it had to trade with the capitalist half of the world was to exchange essential commodities (oil) for hard currency, with which it bought what it needed for its own development (mainly, high technological machines which it could copy and later develop on). So, the USSR didn't "balk" at BW - it was literally impossible for it to pertain to the agreement.

vk , Jan 9 2020 19:40 utc | 45
@ Posted by: vk | Jan 9 2020 19:35 utc | 42

Correction: the three functions of money in capitalism are reserve/store of value, means of exchange and unit of account . I basically wrote "means of exchange" twice in the original comment.

karlof1 , Jan 9 2020 19:45 utc | 47
Cynica @38--

Hello! Michael Hudson first set forth the methodology of the Outlaw US Empire's financial control of the world via his book Super Imperialism: The Economic Strategy of American Empire in 1972. In 2003, he issued an updated edition which you can download for free here .

If you're interested, here's an interview he gave while in China that's autobiographical . And here's his most recent Resume/CV/Bibliography , although it doesn't go into as much detail about his recent work as he does in and forgive them their debts: Lending, Foreclosure, and Redemption From Bronze Age Finance to the Jubilee Year , which for me is fascinating.

His most recent TV appearances are here and here .

karlof1 , Jan 9 2020 19:55 utc | 48
Walter @39--

Bingo! You're the first person here to make that connection aside from myself. You'll note from Hudson's assessment of Soleimani's killing he sees the Outlaw US Empire as using the Climate Crisis as a weapon:

"America's attempt to maintain this buttress explains U.S. opposition to any foreign government steps to reverse global warming and the extreme weather caused by the world's U.S.-sponsored dependence on oil. Any such moves by Europe and other countries would reduce dependence on U.S. oil sales, and hence on the U.S's ability to control the global oil spigot as a means of control and coercion. These are viewed as hostile acts.

"Oil also explains U.S. opposition to Russian oil exports via Nordstream. U.S. strategists want to treat energy as a U.S. national monopoly. Other countries can benefit in the way that Saudi Arabia has done – by sending their surpluses to the U.S. economy – but not to support their own economic growth and diplomacy. Control of oil thus implies support for continued global warming as an inherent part of U.S. strategy....

"This strategy will continue, until foreign countries reject it. If Europe and other regions fail to do so, they will suffer the consequences of this U.S. strategy in the form of a rising U.S.-sponsored war via terrorism, the flow of refugees, and accelerated global warming (and extreme weather)."

c1ue , Jan 9 2020 19:58 utc | 49
@Cynica #38
Financially, the US dollar as reserve currency is enormously beneficial to the US government's ability to spend.
And oil has historically been both a tactical and a strategic necessity; when the US was importing half its oil, this is a lot of money. 8 million bpd @ $50/barrel = $146B. Add in secondary value add like transport, refining, downstream industries, etc and it likely triples the impact or more - but this is only tactical.
Worldwide, the impact is 10X = $1.5 trillion annually. Sure, this is a bit under 10% of the $17.7T in world trade in 2017, but it serves as an "anchor tenant" to the idea of world reserve currency. A second anchor is the overall role of US trade, which was $3.6T in 2016 (imports only).
If we treat central bank reserves as a proxy for currency used in trade, this means 60%+ of the $17.7T in trade is USD. $3.6T is direct, but the $7 trillion in trade that doesn't impact the US is the freebie. To put this in perspective, the entire monetary float of the USD domestically is about $3.6T.
USD as world reserve currency literally doubles (at least) the float - from which the US government can issue debt (money) to fund its activities. In reality, it is likely a lot more since foreigners using USD to fund trade means at least some USD in Central Banks, plus the actual USD in the transaction, plus corporate/individual USD reserves/float.
Again, nothing above is formally linked - I just wanted to convey an idea of just how advantageous the petrodollar/USD as world trade reserve currency really is.

[Jan 08, 2020] The Best Income Investments for 2020,

Notable quotes:
"... The large Vanguard High-Yield Corporate fund (VWEHX) bested most of its peers in 2019, gaining almost 16%. The two largest ETFs are iShares iBoxx High Yield Corporate(HYG), yielding 4.3%, and SPDR Bloomberg Barclays High Yield (JNK), yielding 5%. ..."
"... Many professional investors have long sneered at electric utilities as richly valued and low growth. Yet the group, as measured by the Utilities Select Sector SPDRETF (XLU), has delivered an 11.6% annualized total return in the past decade and 10% during the past five years. ..."
barrons.com

In Asia, In Asia, Toyota Motor (TM), at $141, yields 2%, has a cash-rich balance sheet, and trades for about 10 times forward earnings. Hong Kong–based conglomerate CK Hutchison Holdings (CKHUY), at about $10, offers almost 4%. European drugmakers outpaced their U.S. peers last year, amid optimism about their product pipelines. Novartis (NVS), at $95, yields 3%, and GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), at $47, yields 4%. Among exchange-traded funds, Among exchange-traded funds, Among exchange-traded funds, iShares Core EAFE MSCI (IEFA), at $65, yields 3.2%; iShares Core MSCI Emerging Markets (IEMG), at $54, yields 3.3%; and Vanguard FTSE Europe (VGK) at $58, yields 3.3%.

U.S. Dividend Stocks

There are still plenty of income pockets in a record stock market that allow investors to put together a portfolio with roughly double the 1.8% yield on the S&P 500.

Exxon Mobil (XOM), at $70, yields 5%, and Chevron (CVX), at $120, yield 4%. Pfizer (PFE), at $39, yields almost 4%, and cruise industry leader Carnival (CCL), at $50, yields 3.9%. United Parcel Service (UPS), at $117, yields 3.3%. Kraft Heinz (KHC), the biggest loser in the food group in 2019, has the top yield among its peers at 5% after cutting its payout by 36% last year.

https://tpc.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-37/html/container.html

David King, manager of the Columbia Flexible Capital Income fund (CFIAX), is partial to General Mills (GIS), which, at $53, yields 3.7%. The company has cut debt since its 2018 purchase of Blue Buffalo Pet Products, potentially paving the way for its first dividend increase since 2017 in its fiscal year that starts in May, he says. Oil refiners are a good source of income, with King favoring one of the largest, Valero Energy (VLO), which at $93, yields 3.8%.

There are plenty of dividend-focused mutual funds and ETFs, including top-performing Vanguard Dividend Growth fund (VDIGX), which reopened to investors last year. Large ETFs include Vanguard High Dividend Yield Index (VYM) which yields 3%, and the ProShares S&P 500 Dividend Aristocrats (NOBL), which features companies with long histories of annual payout increases, rather than those with the highest yields. It pays 1.9%.

REITs

Wall Street warmed to real estate investment trusts, which returned 29% (including dividends) based on the broad and popular Vanguard Real Estate ETF (VNQ). That nearly matched the S&P 500 in 2019.

J.P. Morgan 's REIT analysts recently forecast an 8% to 9% total return for REIT stocks in 2020, based on a combination of dividends -- now averaging more than 3% -- and 4.3% growth in funds from operations, or FFO, an important measure of cash flow .

https://tpc.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-37/html/container.html

The negative is that REIT valuations are near record highs at about 20 times estimated 2020 FFO. The J.P. Morgan analysts wrote that those valuations could "act as a cap on absolute upside from here."

Industrial REITs were standouts. Warehouse leader Prologis (PLD) gained 50%, as investors sought direct plays on the e-commerce boom. Mall REITs suffered from the same trend and had the worst performance in the group. Simon Property Group (SPG), the largest mall REIT, lost 11%, while the smaller Taubman Centers (TCO) declined 32%. Reflecting elevated risk in the mall sector, Simon yields 5.7% and Taubman, 9%, against Prologis at just 2.4% and the Vanguard REIT ETF at 3.4%.

Investors now favor apartment REITs, such as AvalonBay Communities (AVB) and Equity Residential (EQR), which yield 3%. Top New York office REITs Vornado Realty Trust (VNO) and SL Green Realty (SLG) are contrarian plays because of concerns over new Manhattan office supply and the high cost of upgrading older buildings. Vornado and SL Green yield 4% and trade below some analysts' estimates of their asset values.

U.S. Telecom Stocks

The sector offers a combination of elevated yields and depressed valuations.

https://tpc.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-37/html/container.html

Verizon Communications (VZ), at about $61, was up less than 10% in 2019 and has a secure 4% dividend. AT&T (T) was the sector standout, rising 37%, to $39, thanks to an ultralow valuation at the start of 2019 and pressure from activist investor Elliott Management, which took a stake during 2019. AT&T yields over 5%. Verizon trades for 12 times projected 2020 earnings of $5 a share, while AT&T trades at 11 times earnings. Both are cheap, relative to the market's price/earnings ratio of 18.

A related play is Comcast (CMCSA), the largest U.S. cable company. Its growth outlook is better than the telecoms, thanks to its lucrative broadband services. Comcast's stock, at $45, yields less than 2%, but trades for a reasonable 14 times projected 2020 earnings.

Convertibles

Often overlooked, convertibles are stock-bond hybrids designed to provide the upside of stocks and the downside protection of bonds. They did that in 2019, returning 22%, as measured by the SPDR Bloomberg Barclays Convertible Securities ETF (CWB). There are two main types of convertibles: traditional bonds with a fixed maturity date and so-called mandatory convertibles that are equity substitutes.

Traditional convertibles have more downside protection. Tesla (TSLA) demonstrated that feature, as the company's 2% convertible held up well at midyear when the electric-car manufacturer's stock cratered, and it has rallied along with the stock in recent months. Technology and biotech companies are major issuers of convertibles because they can get low borrowing costs of 2% or less.

https://tpc.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-37/html/container.html

Mandatory convertibles from electric utilities normally have three-year maturities and provide higher yields than common shares. But they have less upside than the stocks. DTE Energy (DTE), parent of Detroit Edison, has a 6.25% issue due in 2022, and American Electric Power (AEP) has a 6.125% issue due in 2022.

Junk Bonds

After a rocky 2018, the market had one of the its best years in a decade, returning 14% based on the Bloomberg Barclays U.S. Corporate High Yield Bond Index. With the average junk bond now yielding just 5.1%, down from 8% at the start of 2019, returns may be modest in 2020.

Marty Fridson, the chief investment officer at Lehmann Livian Fridson Advisors, says a total return around 3.5% is possible in 2020, based on an assumption of a slight rise in Treasury yields and little change in the spreads between junk bonds and Treasuries.

Investors favored better-quality junk issues in 2019, but the most speculative part of the market, bonds rated CCC, rallied in December, helped by gains in hard-hit energy debt.

https://tpc.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-37/html/container.html

The large Vanguard High-Yield Corporate fund (VWEHX) bested most of its peers in 2019, gaining almost 16%. The two largest ETFs are iShares iBoxx High Yield Corporate(HYG), yielding 4.3%, and SPDR Bloomberg Barclays High Yield (JNK), yielding 5%.

Junk-rated energy debt offers a high-yielding alternative to riskier common shares. Examples include Southwestern Energy 7.5% bonds due in 2026, at a 8.75% yield; Range Resources 4.875% bonds due in 2025, at 8%; and Diamond Offshore 4.875% bonds due in 2043, at nearly 10%.

Tax-Exempt Muni Bonds

The municipal market is getting treacherous in the wake of a rally that dropped yields as much as a percentage point in 2019.

Muni-bond funds had returns of 6% to 11% in 2019, but they will be hard-pressed to repeat that in 2020, given current low rates.

https://tpc.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-37/html/container.html

Absolute yields on AAA-rated 10-year munis now stand at 1.4%, about 78% of the yield on the comparable-maturity Treasury, against an average of close to 85% in recent years. Many munis yield less than the current 2% U.S. inflation rate.

Alan Schankel, muni bond strategist at Janney Montgomery Scott, thinks that muni returns will run at 2% to 3% in 2020. One supporting factor could be continued strong flows into mutual funds after a record 2019, when an estimated $90 billion of new money poured into funds.

The largest fund is the Vanguard Intermediate-Term Tax-Exempt (VWIUX), with a 2.7% trailing 12-month yield, and the biggest exchange-traded fund is iShares National Muni Bond (MUB), yielding 2.4%

High-yield munis are popular as investors search for yield. This demand enabled Nuveen, which runs Nuveen High-Yield Municipal Bond (NHMAX), the largest open-end fund with a low-grade focus, to bring to market a closed-end fund with a similar strategy: Nuveen Municipal Credit Opportunities (NMCO), which yields 5%. Muni closed-end funds are no longer bargains after 20%-plus total returns in 2019.

Taxable Muni Bonds

Tax-law changes that took effect in 2018 restricting the ability of state and local governments to refinance tax-exempt debt have led to a boom in taxable muni bonds. Total issuance approached $70 billion in 2019 and may hit $100 billion this year, against an annual average of $30 billion for much of the decade. Big issuers include California and the Dallas/Fort Worth airport.

One advantage of taxable munis over corporate bonds is that they are generally tax-exempt in the issuer's home state, although they are subject to federal income taxes. With top state rates now at 10% or above in places like California, that is a nice bonus.

Closed-end funds focused on the sector include BlackRock Taxable Municipal Bond Trust (BBN) and Nuveen Taxable Municipal Income (NBB). Both yield over 5%. Another play is the Invesco Taxable Municipal Bond ETF (BAB), which yields about 3.7%.

A group of high-quality issuers like Georgetown University and the University of Pennsylvania have issued 100-year munis in recent years that now yield in the 3.25% to 4% range. Beware of rate risk with such ultralong maturity dates.

Electric Utilities

Many professional investors have long sneered at electric utilities as richly valued and low growth. Yet the group, as measured by the Utilities Select Sector SPDRETF (XLU), has delivered an 11.6% annualized total return in the past decade and 10% during the past five years.

It is harder, however, to make a strong case now for utilities, after a 25% gain in the XLU during 2019 that lowered its dividend yield to 3.1%. Four leading utilities, Dominion Energy (D), Southern Co. (SO), Duke Energy (DUK), and American Electric Power (AEP), now trade for an average of 20 times projected 2020 earnings -- a premium to the market.

The largest utility, renewables-rich NextEra Energy (NEE), is valued at 27 times forward earnings. The bull case is that utilities are defensive and can produce mid-single digit profit growth in the coming years.

Preferred Stock

Preferred stock looks less appealing after a strong run in 2019. The iShares Preferred & Income Securities ETF (PFF) returned 16%, including dividends, for the year. It now yields about 5%.

Banks are the largest issuers, and some preferred shares from JPMorgan Chase (JPM), Morgan Stanley (MS), and Bank of America (BAC) now yield less than 5%.

That is a nice premium above the 30-year Treasury, which yields just 2.3%. But there are risks. Preferreds are typically perpetual, while issuers are able to redeem them at their face value in five years if rates fall.

That means a lot of downside -- some preferred stocks fell 20% in price during the late-2018 interest-rate rise -- and limited upside. One plus is that most preferred dividends get preferential tax treatment, like those of common stocks.

"It is heads, you win a little, and tails, you lose a lot," Dan Fuss, the veteran bond manager and chief of the Loomis Sayles Bond fund, told Barron's in the fall.

A recent JPMorgan preferred with a 4.75% dividend rate now yields 4.64%, and a Morgan Stanley 4.875% issue yields 4.80%. With most of these securities trading at a premium to face value, investors should look at the lower "yield to call," which is based on an assumed redemption at the call date five years after issuance, rather than the higher current yield.

Preferred-focused closed-end funds, such as Nuveen Preferred & Income Opportunities (JPC) and John Hancock Preferred Income (HPI), have returned more than 30% this year. They look fully priced.

Treasuries

The best thing about Treasuries is their defensive value. U.S. government bonds have often moved inversely with equities and thus offer put-like qualities -- and some yield.

Treasury yields, however, are paltry, ranging from 1.5% on T-bills to 2.3% on the 30-year bond. No wonder that prominent investors like Warren Buffett and DoubleLine Capital CEO Jeffrey Gundlach aren't enamored of them.

Treasury inflation-protected securities, or TIPs, are an alternative to U.S. Treasuries, since the inflation break-even is about 1.8% for the 10-year and 30-year -- below the current 2% inflation rate.

"The ultimate enemy of fixed-income investors is inflation," says Stephen Cianci, senior global portfolio manager at MacKay Shields. TIPs offer protection against rising inflation at a good price, he adds.

Exchange-traded funds, such as iShares TIPS Bond (TIP), can offer a smart way to invest in Treasuries. Others range from the safe iShares Short Treasury (SHV) to the riskier iShares 20+Year Treasury Bond (TLT).

Given the narrow yield gap between short and long Treasuries, it may pay to stay shorter.

Write to Andrew Bary at andrew.bary@barrons.com

[Jan 08, 2020] Vanguard High Dividend Yield ETF (VYM) Quote - Morningstar

Jan 08, 2020 | www.morningstar.com

https://www.morningstar.com/etfs/arcx/vym/quote

[Jan 08, 2020] Deification of questionable metrics is an objective phenomenon that we observe under neoliberalism

Jan 08, 2020 | angrybearblog.com

.

  1. likbez , January 8, 2020 4:00 am

    @run75441 January 7, 2020 5:45 pm

    In my golden days, I did manufacturing throughput analysis, cost modeled parts, and reviewed component and transportation distribution. I am curious. Forget all that neoliberal stuff . . .

    Ohh, those golden days 😉

    Measurement has its place and is the cornerstone of science, but it is not equal to pattern recognition. And when applied to social phenomena with their complexity it is more often a trap, rather then an insight.

    You need to understand that.

    Deification of questionable metrics is an objective phenomenon that we observe under neoliberalism.

    A classic example of deification of a questionable metric under neoliberalism is the "cult of GDP" ("If the GDP Is Up, Why Is America Down?") See , for example

    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/nov/24/metrics-gdp-economic-performance-social-progress

    Also see a rather interesting albeit raw take on the same ("Growth for the sake of growth is the ideology of the cancer cell." ) at:

    http://casinocapitalism.info/Skeptics/Financial_skeptic/Casino_capitalism/Number_racket/gdp_is_a_questionable_measure_of_economic_growth.shtml

    For example, many people discuss stagnation of GDP growth in Japan not understanding here we are talking about the country with shrinking population. And adjusted for this factor I am not sure that it not higher then in the USA (were it is grossly distorted by the cancerous growth of FIRE sector).

    So while comparing different years for a single country might make some limited sense, those who blindly compare GDP of different countries (even with PPP adjustment) IMHO belong to a modern category of economic charlatans. Kind of Lysenkoism, if you wish

    That tells you something about primitivism and pseudo-scientific nature of neoliberal economics.

    We also need to remember the "performance reviews travesty" which is such a clear illustration of "cult of measurement" abuses that it does not it even requires commentary. Google has abolished numerical ratings in April 2014.

    Recently I come across an interesting record of early application of it in AT&T at Brian W Kernighan book UNIX: A History and a Memoir at late 60th, early as 70th.

[Jan 08, 2020] Something is really fishy with Paul Krugman: he complained that someone used his IP address to download child porn

Something is really fishy here. Dynamic IP address is reassigned only if you do not switch on you computer on for several days, which is not very probable for Krugman. Otherwise it is glued to this device and is difficult to highjack without installing malware on the computer or router. and he should have static IP anyway, he is not some poor shmuck and can afford extra $10 a month to have.
Two devices with the same IP on the network are usually automatically detected and it is difficult to use them for download, as during this time the second device will lose Internet connection completely and the problem will be detected by the ISP support.
So the only option is that somebody installed backdoor malware on Krugman computer and used his harddrive for storage. That's an extremely improbable scenario, unless he visited some grey site himself.
Jan 08, 2020 | www.zerohedge.com

Death2Fiat , 5 minutes ago link

No doubt Krugman has dirt on him for blackmail. No one gets his kind of job without being compromised.

The Last Sasquatch , 12 minutes ago link

These aren't my pants

Johann Gelbwesten , 25 minutes ago link

Probably happened when he clicked on an email from Prince Andrew.

theWHTMANN , 25 minutes ago link

C'mon that guy's face screams...

CosmoJoe , 31 minutes ago link

Getting ahead of it quickly eh Paul?

WP82 , 32 minutes ago link

Gee. Maybe it's nobody other than Krugman using His IP address.

Covering his a$$?

Captain Phoebus , 33 minutes ago link

Don't we believe him?

Jackprong , 35 minutes ago link

Typical ... to blame his actions on his perceived enemies.

[Jan 08, 2020] Russia has Peaked , according to the Minister of Energy.

Jan 08, 2020 | peakoilbarrel.com

Ronny Patterson

Ignored says: 01/02/2020 AT 1:49 PM

Russia has Peaked , according to the Minister of Energy.

Russia's Interest In Oil Production Cuts Is Waning

Russia is planning level production for the next 4 years.

"As far as the production cuts are concerned, I repeat once again, this is not an indefinite process. A decision on the exit should be gradually taken in order to keep up market share and so that our companies would be able to provide and implement their future projects. I think that we will consider that this year."(2020)

Meanwhile, Russia's energy ministry is assuming that the country's total output is to average around and slightly above 11.2 million barrels per day until 2024. In other words, it is not building any cut into its plan.

Russia's peak month, so far, was December 2018 at 11,408,000 barrels per day. The average daily production for 2018 was 11,115,000 bpd. Average production for 2019 was 11,211,000 bpd. This is the level they hope to hold for the next 4 years.

Russia's production increased by an average of 96,000 barrels per day in 2019. They are not expecting any further increase at all. They just hope to hold at 2019 levels for another four years. I think they will be very lucky if they manage that.

Point is, the world's largest producer, the USA, will likely peak in a few months. The world's second-largest producer, Russia, is admitting they have peaked. The world's third-largest producer, Saudi Arabia, has very likely peaked though they do not admit it. OPEC likely peaked in 2016, *Iran and Venezuela notwithstanding.

*Iran peaked in 2005 at 3,938,000 bpd. My Venezuela records only go back to 2001 when they produced 2,961,000 bpd. However, they peaked several years before that. However, neither is producing at maximum capacity today due to political problems. However both are clearly in decline regardless of political problems keeping them from producing flat out.

If we are at peak oil right now we are damn close to it.

The Russian Chart below is C+C through December 2019.

REPLY

Ron Patterson Ignored says: 01/02/2020 AT 6:00 PM

Ovi, the data in my chart above is from the official Ministry of Energy web site, converting tons to barrels at 7.33 barrels per ton:
MINISTRY OF ENERGY OF RUSSIAN FEDERATION

The site has not updated the December numbers but the Minister has released them. They can be found here:

UPDATE 1-Russian oil, condensate output surges to record-high in 2019

In December, total oil and gas condensate stood at 11.262 million bpd, up from 11.244 million bpd in November, according to the data.

Those are the exact numbers I used in my chart above. And yes, 2019 was a new high, exactly as I stated in the post above. Its yearly average beat the 2018 yearly average by 90,000 bpd.

Concerning 2020 average, it could not be stated any clearer than this:

Russian Energy Minister Alexander Novak expects Russian oil and condensate production of between 555 million tonnes and 565 million tonnes in 2020, or 11.12-11.32 million bpd using a conversion rate of 7.33 barrels per tonne of oil.

Or this from the link:
Russia's Interest In Oil Production Cuts Is Waning Bold mine:

Russia did not comply with the cuts in 2019.

Got an exemption for condensates at the OPEC meeting, though this was not discussed in the press conference.

Achieving another cut of 70,000 b/d in first quarter appears to be beyond its capability, given past statements.

Russia is planning level production for next 4 years.

And is prepared for oil prices to drop to $25-30 per barrel.

You wrote: I found this statement interesting, in that if they can't increase production, and are at max, why are they worried about market share.

I really don't understand that question. If they plan on producing 11.2 million barrels per day for the next four years, then they should be worried about their market share. Whether they can or cannot produce more than that is beside the point.

[Jan 08, 2020] "Debt Wish 2020" Did Iran strike affects dollar status as the world reserve currency, because it is a clear sign the the period of the USA absolute hegemony after the dissolution of the USSR came the end?

Jan 08, 2020 | www.moonofalabama.org

karlof1 , Jan 8 2020 0:02 utc | 110

psychohistorian @88--

What was your take on "Debt Wish 2020"?

Jezabeel @82--

"U.S. Economic Warfare and Likely Foreign Defenses" provides numerous methods besides simply the cessation of dollar use for international commercial transactions. Along with watching the "Debt Wish 2020" vid linked above, I also suggest reading/watching this program . And lastly, I suggest reading this analysis here , although it only tangentially deals with your question.

[Jan 08, 2020] Where to Invest 2020

Jan 08, 2020 | www.kiplinger.com

High-yield bonds (avoid the oil patch), emerging-markets bonds and dividend-paying stocks such as real estate investment trusts and utilities are good places to hunt for yield. Funds to consider include Vanguard High Yield Corporate ( VWEHX ), yielding 4.5%, and TCW Emerging Markets Bond ( TGEIX ), yielding 5.1%. Schwab US Dividend Equity ( SCHD , $56), a member of the Kiplinger ETF 20 list of our favorite ETFs, invests in high-quality dividend payers and yields just over 3%. Spath, at Sierra Funds, is bullish on preferred stocks. IShares Preferred and Income Securities ETF ( PFF , $37) yields 5.5%. (For more ideas, see Income Investing .)

[Jan 08, 2020] The 7 Best Bond Funds for Retirement Savers in 2020

Jan 08, 2020 | www.kiplinger.com

Market value: $71.3 billion

SEC yield: 1.6%

Expense ratio: 0.17%

Suppose my outlook for the bond market is either wrong, or at best, premature. Bond yields could fall next year, or just stay relatively flat. That's why it usually makes sense to own more than one bond fund.

Vanguard Intermediate-Term Tax-Exempt Investor ( VWITX , $14.41) should hold up pretty well if rates rise only a small amount in 2020, and it could trounce the other funds in this article if rates fall.

VWITX's duration is 4.9 years. That means if bond yields rise by one percentage point, the fund's price should decline by 4.9%. That wouldn't be fun for investors, but it would hardly be catastrophic, especially when you factor in the yield.

Like most Vanguard bond offerings, Vanguard Intermediate-Term Tax-Exempt Investor is plain vanilla, and that's OK. It sticks almost entirely to high-quality municipal bonds. Its weighted average credit quality is a sterling AA.

VWITX also has been a decent performer, at an annualized 3.1% total return over the past five years.

Learn more about VWITX at the Vanguard provider site.

[Jan 07, 2020] 5 Energy ETFs to Buy for Higher Oil Prices - Nasdaq.com

Jan 07, 2020 | old.nasdaq.com

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5 Energy ETFs to Buy for Higher Oil Prices January 03, 2020, 01:55:35 AM EDT By Kiplinger
loading Shutterstock photo

Energy stocks and exchange-traded funds (ETFs) were a miserable bet in 2019. Indeed, the energy sector was the worst-performing sector by a mile, gaining less than 5% - far below the S&P 500's 29% return, and significantly lagging even the second worst sector, health care (18%).

However, despite tepid analyst outlooks for oil and gas prices in 2020, energy ETFs and individual stocks are suddenly being thrust in the spotlight once more.

On Jan. 2, the Pentagon confirmed that the U.S. military killed Qasem Soleimani - a top Iranian general who headed the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps' elite Quds Force - with a drone airstrike in Iraq. While the Pentagon said the attack was meant to deter "future Iranian attack plans," Iran nonetheless has vowed "severe revenge." The clear, abrupt escalation in Middle East tensions immediately sent oil prices higher in response.

Whether oil continues to climb is unclear. Tensions could de-escalate. Also, American fracking has changed the playing field. "The major potential risk - to oil markets - is mitigated by the fact that the U.S. is now the largest producer of oil and essentially approaching Energy independence," says Brad McMillan, Chief Investment Officer for Commonwealth Financial Network. "Our oil supplies are much less vulnerable than they were, and the availability of oil exports from the U.S. means that other countries have an alternative source."

However, if the conflict worsens - especially if oil tankers and infrastructure are targeted in any violence - oil might continue to spike, regardless.

Here, we explore five energy ETFs to buy to take advantage of higher oil prices. But approach them with caution. Just like increases in crude-oil prices should benefit each of these funds in one way or another, declines in oil have weighed on them in the past, and likely would again.

SEE ALSO: The 20 Best ETFs to Buy for a Prosperous 2020

Invesco Dynamic Energy Exploration & Production ETF

Market value: $25.6 million

Dividend yield: 1.7%

Expenses: 0.63%, or $63 annually on a $10,000 investment*

Exploration and production (E&P) companies are among the energy stocks most heavily dependent on commodity prices. These firms seek out sources of oil and natural gas, then physically extract the hydrocarbons. They typically make their money by selling oil and gas to refiners, who turn them into products such as gasoline, diesel fuel and kerosene.

While costs to extract those hydrocarbons vary from company to company, in general, the more they can sell those hydrocarbons for, the fatter their profits.

The Invesco Dynamic Energy Exploration & Production ETF ( PXE , $16.69) is a smaller energy ETF that allows you to buy the industry broadly, providing access to 30 U.S. stocks that are primarily engaged in E&P. These companies include the likes of Marathon Oil ( MRO ), Devon Energy ( DVN ) and ConocoPhillips ( COP ).

While many sector funds will simply assign weights to each stock based on their relative size (e.g., the largest stocks account for the largest percentages of the fund's assets), PXE does things a little differently. For one, its underlying index evaluates companies based on various criteria, including value, quality, earnings momentum and price momentum. It also "tiers" market capitalization groups, ultimately giving mid- and small-cap stocks a chance to shine. Roughly half of PXE's assets are allocated to small companies, and another 36% are in midsize firms, leaving just 14% to larger corporations.

These smaller companies sometimes react more aggressively to oil- and gas-price changes than their larger brethren - good news for PXE when commodity prices spike, but more painful when they slump.

* Includes a one-basis-point fee waiver good through at least Aug. 31, 2021.

Learn more about PXE at the Invesco provider site.

SEE ALSO: The 11 Best ETFs to Buy for Portfolio Protection

Energy Select Sector SPDR Fund

Market value: $11.1 billion

Dividend yield: 3.7%

Expenses: 0.13%

The Energy Select Sector SPDR Fund ( XLE , $60.58) is the de facto king of energy ETFs, with more than $11 billion in assets under management - No. 2, Vanguard Energy ETF ( VDE ), has just $3.2 billion. But it's also a much different creature than the aforementioned PXE - and that affects how much it can benefit from oil-price spikes.

For one, the Energy SPDR is a collection of the 28 energy stocks within the S&P 500, so most of the fund (83%) is large-cap stocks, with the rest invested in mid-caps. There are no small companies in the XLE.

More importantly: While the XLE owns pure E&P plays, including some of PXE's holdings, it also invests in other businesses that have different relationships with oil prices. For instance, refiners - who take hydrocarbons and turn them into useful products - often improve when oil prices decline, as that lowers their input costs. Middle East flare-ups can negatively affect some refiners that rely on crude oil supplies from the region, too, while lifting those that don't. This fund also carries energy-infrastructure companies such as Kinder Morgan ( KMI ), whose "toll booth"-like business is more reliant on how much oil and gas is going through its pipelines and terminals than on the prices for those products.

Then there's XLE's top two holdings: Exxon Mobil ( XOM ) and Chevron ( CVX ), which collectively command 45% of assets. Exxon and Chevron integrated oil majors, meaning they're involved in almost every aspect of the business, from E&P to refining to transportation to distribution (think: gas stations). As a result, they can benefit from higher oil prices ... but it's a complicated relationship.

Still, XLE typically does improve when oil and gas prices do, and it holds large, well-funded companies that are better able to withstand price slumps than smaller energy firms. It also offers up a generous 3.7% dividend yield that will help you withstand small disruptions in energy prices.

Learn more about XLE at the SPDR provider site.

SEE ALSO: The 7 Best New ETFs of 2019

iShares North American Natural Resources ETF

Market value: $496.0 million

Dividend yield: 5.6%*

Expenses: 0.46%

The iShares North American Natural Resources ETF ( IGE , $30.17) provides broad-based energy-sector exposure similar to the XLE, but with a number of twists.

The first has to do with the name. Whereas the XLE is a collection of U.S. companies within the S&P 500, the IGE's holdings are within all of North America. U.S. companies still dominate the fund, at 77%, but the remaining assets are spread across numerous Canadian companies, including multinational Enbridge ( ENB ).

IGE also invests more broadly, across 100 energy-sector companies. The fund is cap-weighted, so Chevron and Exxon are still tops, but they make up far smaller percentages at the fund - roughly 10% each, versus about 22% each in XLE.

Another difference is found in the name: "natural resources." In addition to heavy investment in energy industries such as integrated oil and gas companies (26%), E&P (19%) and storage and transportation (17%), IGE also owns gold mining (7%) and even construction materials (3%) companies, among other non-energy firms. Thus, while IGE will move on changes in oil and gas prices, its movement can be affected by other commodities, too.

* IGE's most recent distribution included a special one-time distribution from Occidental Petroleum ( OXY ) as part of its acquisition of Anadarko Petroleum. This has skewed the dividend yield data at providers such as Morningstar. While Morningstar lists a trailing 12-month yield of 5.6%, iShares' listed trailing 12-month yield of 2.8%, as of Nov. 29, 2019, is much closer to what investors can expect. XLE's stated yield of 3.7% excludes a separate special payout it made closer to the end of the year related to its exposure to Occidental.

Learn more about IGE at the iShares provider site.

SEE ALSO: 3 Preferred Stock ETFs for High, Stable Dividends

iShares Global Energy ETF

Market value: $852.2 million

Dividend yield: 7.0%*

Expenses: 0.46%

The iShares Global Energy ETF ( IXC , $31.08) takes geographical diversification another step farther, and unlike IGE, it focuses completely on energy.

A reminder here that "global" and "international" mean different things. If a fund says it's international, chances are it holds no U.S. stocks. A global fund, however, can and will invest in American stocks as well as international ones ... and often, the U.S. is the largest slice of the pie.

The IXC is no exception, holding a 52% slug of American companies. It also has another 12% of its assets invested in Canadian companies. However, the U.K. (16%) and France (6%) are significant weights in the fund, and it also allows investors to reach energy companies in Brazil, China and Australia, among a few other countries. International top holdings include France's Total ( TOT ) and Dutch-British oil giant Royal Dutch Shell ( RDS.A ).

Like other energy ETFs, IXC's holdings are primarily driven by oil and gas prices. But other factors are at play, such as the fact that some of these companies have distribution businesses that are reliant on strong gasoline demand, which can be affected by a country's economic strength. Investing across several countries can help reduce such risks.

* Like IGE, IXC's most recent distribution was affected by a special one-time distribution from Occidental Petroleum. While Morningstar lists a trailing 12-month yield of 7.0%, iShares' listed trailing 12-month yield of 4.0%, as of Nov. 29, 2019, is much closer to what investors can expect.

Learn more about IXC at the iShares provider site.

SEE ALSO: 7 ESG ETFs to Buy for Responsible Profits

United States Oil Fund

Market value: $1.2 billion

Dividend yield: N/A

Expenses: 0.73%

But what if you want to invest closer to the source? That is, what if rather than buying oil companies, you wanted to invest in crude oil itself?

The United States Oil Fund ( USO , $12.81) is one of a few energy ETFs that let you do that ... but be warned that it's not as straightforward as it seems.

The USO is an "exchange-traded security designed to track the daily price movements of West Texas Intermediate ("WTI") light, sweet crude oil" - what most refer to as "U.S. crude." However, unlike some commodity funds, such as the iShares Gold Trust ( IAU ), that actually hold the physical commodity, USO invests in crude oil futures, as well as other financial instruments to generate its returns.

The problem? USO holds "front-month" futures, so every month it must sell any contracts that are about to expire and replace them with futures expiring in the next month. This can result in cases where USO is selling contracts for less than what it's buying up new ones from - or sometimes the opposite, buying for less than what it's selling for.

In short, this means that sometimes USO will reliably track WTI, but sometimes it won't - it might go lower when West Texas crude goes higher, and vice versa. The fund's expenses further throw off performance.

USO clearly is far from perfect. But it remains a more direct play on oil than publicly traded companies, and it generally will follow WTI's direction over time.

Learn more about USO at the USCF provider site.

SEE ALSO: The Kip ETF 20: The 20 Best Cheap ETFs You Can Buy

The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.


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[Jan 07, 2020] Risk Off

Jan 07, 2020 | jessescrossroadscafe.blogspot.com
Rome and the whole pagan world had gone mad, and Caesar was swimming in blood.. . "Four sorrows are certain to be visited on the United States.
  • First, there will be a state of perpetual war.
  • Second is a loss of democracy and Constitutional rights as the presidency eclipses Congress and is itself transformed from a co-equal 'executive branch' of government into a military junta.
  • Third is the replacement of truth by propaganda, disinformation, and the glorification of war, power, and the military legions.
  • Lastly, there is bankruptcy, as the United States pours its economic resources into ever more grandiose military projects and shortchanges the education, health, and safety of its citizens." Chalmers Johnson, The Sorrows of Empire, 2005
  • "Seneca had made the bargain that many good men have made when agreeing to aid bad regimes. On the one hand, their presence strengthens the regime and helps it endure. But their moral influence may also improve the regime's behavior or save the lives of its enemies. For many, this has been a bargain worth making, even if it has cost them -- as it may have cost Seneca -- their immortal soul." ~James Romm, Dying Every Day: Seneca at the Court of Nero

    "If you are wise and understand God's ways, prove it by living an honorable life, doing good works with the humility that comes from wisdom. But if you are bitterly jealous and there is selfish ambition in your heart, don't hide the truth with boasting and lying. For jealousy and selfishness are not God's kind of wisdom. Such things are worldly, carnal, and demonic. For wherever there is jealousy and selfish ambition, there you will find disorder and evil of every kind." ~James 3:13-15

    [Jan 04, 2020] Good point Afghanistan. The newly appointed General Ghaani was active in Afghanistan. As he is famimiar with the place, that may well be where he decides to retaliate.

    Jan 04, 2020 | thesaker.is

    Serbian girl on January 03, 2020 , · at 5:00 pm EST/EDT

    Good point Afghanistan. The newly appointed General Ghaani was active in Afghanistan. As he is famimiar with the place, that may well be where he decides to retaliate.

    In case the link does not work, Elijah magnier's and Roberto Neccia's tweet.
    https://mobile.twitter.com/neccia1/status/1213045008204533760

    Str8arrow62 on January 03, 2020 , · at 5:18 pm EST/EDT
    The introduction of manpads would be no less significant an impact on the occupying force as it was when the Soviet's were there when the SEE EYE AYE showered the Afghani's with Stingers. It completely changed the modus of the Soviet army once they were introduced. Helicopters became dangerous to be in and could no longer fly near the ground. Good observations though, the assassination of Assad could prove to be magnitudes greater a spark than any of us could imagine. I hope for the sake of, among the many, the Christians he's been protecting from the foreign merc's. that he stays safe. He must keep a low profile and let's hope the S400's will take care of any Predator drones that try to fly the Damascus airspace. ­
    C. Khosta y Alzamendi on January 03, 2020 , · at 6:43 pm EST/EDT
    It seems US (or perhaps Israel) didn't give you time enough to think about what could be the next move (breaking news from Sputinik, 23:30 GMT): vehicle convoy carrying Iraqi PMF leaders hit by airstrike, 6 dead at least.

    https://sputniknews.com/middleeast/202001041077936776-two-car-convoy-north-of-baghdad-under-aerial-attack -- reports/

    Chad on January 03, 2020 , · at 3:34 pm EST/EDT
    Thanks for posting this. I wonder if Soleimani consciously ( on many human and beyond human levels) wanted to offer the Yanks a "target" (a type of sacrifice, namely himself) that was just too big to ignore, knowing that the stupid enemy would take the bait, and having a secure knowledge that his death would set in motion a chain of events that will (underline will) result in the final terrible fall of the US, and Israel. Stupid American "leaders", right now, they are dancing in idiotic joy, saying foolish words for which we will pay, also knowing what the future holds: the death of countless people, throughout not only the Middle East, but here in the US as well. Yes, I do hate them for what they have unleashed.

    Rest In Peace, Soleimani. You very well may achieve far more in death that you attained in your eventful life.

    What do we know about Esmail Ghaani?

    [Jan 04, 2020] I believe is most depressing is how dumb people are

    Jan 04, 2020 | www.moonofalabama.org

    oldhippie , Jan 4 2020 18:11 utc | 13

    Sitting in coffee shop in Chicago listening to Americans. The general sentiment is they had it coming and Iran should be nuked.
    Glass parking lot is the desired end.

    This sentiment is bottom to top in America. Measured response? No way can Iran 'measure' a response.

    More generally the sentiment is that a little war in Iran, a few nukes, is not even a big thing. Football scores more important.

    Isabella , Jan 4 2020 18:22 utc | 16

    "Sitting in coffee shop in Chicago listening to Americans. The general sentiment is they had it coming and Iran should be nuked.
    Glass parking lot is the desired end."

    That's pretty much the picture i get from reading responses in UK MSM, not only from English, but many giving American addresses. They are all pretty much thoroughly brainwashed, believing as gospel the lies they've told, and still think that they are the "White hatted, good guys, who do good things for the places they bomb and invade".

    it seems they will be supportive of an attack on Iran, and if their maniac "leaders", the basement crazies who got out of the basement, realise this, it increases substantially the chances of a "hot" war. In that case, should it escalate out of control, your Chicago coffee deadheads will get the Glass parking lot they want. It just wont be in the ME. Or Russia. They can have their very own, in their own back yard.

    Zanon , Jan 4 2020 21:09 utc | 76
    Information_Agent

    Yes I also noticed this, what I believe is most depressing is how dumb people are. Trump/White house tell alot of lies which then become the truth for alot of his supporters and he also manage to get MSM where he wants, because MSM do not seems to care either, they are on-board when it comes to war.
    And yes additional to that, a clear psychological operation going on to get the propaganda out.
    I try to counter it on social media, I hope everyone here also do the same.

    Pft , Jan 4 2020 21:48 utc | 79
    Patroklos @77

    Its about conditioning people that its the new normal. Anything goes, "do as thou wilt". So long as it serves the interests of our masters. With no fear that MSM or alt media can or will provide sustained or effective criticism, and the corruption of religious or secular morals among the population thanks to hollywoods cultural marxism/propaganda and corruption of christianity , they can get support among the people for just about anything. People can be made to believe anything. The past 100 years has proven that beyond all doubt. With all doubt now removed they can show their true colors and this will be accepted as the new normal.

    Dick , Jan 4 2020 22:13 utc | 83
    The problem with the US is most everyone in the US military, US citizenry, and US government believe their own Exceptionalism propaganda and act accordingly. Attacking the PMU units of the Iraqi army was certainly an unwise decision, but killing Qassem Soleimani and Abu Mahdi Al-Muhandis is an act of complete moronic insanity!
    Robert Snefjella , Jan 5 2020 0:22 utc | 121
    The United States launched a war of aggression, the supreme crime, upon Iraq in 2003, based on blatant lies, and are still there. Prior to that, they helped foment the war between Iraq and Iran, then attacked Iraq in 1991, and on top of the overt warfare there was the economic sanctions warfare. The death and maiming and poisoning of millions of Iraqis has been the American contribution to Iraq, over the last several decades. What for? How has this helped the United States? Or Europe? The main advocates for this supreme criminality has been the Israel lobby, Israel, and the supporters of Israel.

    The American Apache helicopters are still buzzing around over Baghdad, dealing out terror and intimidation and death. The murder by the United States of yet more Iraqi soldiers and officials recently has been largely absent from the propaganda narratives. But could those be 'the final straw'?

    As far as Trump's 52 target threat, this comes after the apparent please don't escalate and we'll make a deal - good cop-bad cop routine.

    The 52 number was used to remind mind-controlled Americans that the evil Iranians outrageously took 52 Americans hostage. American's don't just take people hostage; they give them orange suits and torture them, unless they kill them. Apart from murdering and maiming by the millions, they even stage fictional killings, like Osama bin laden, to entertain the zombies, and stick out their chests, hand out medals and the like.

    [Jan 03, 2020] For corporate Democrats and their profuse media allies, the approach of disparaging and minimizing Bernie Sanders in 2019 didn't work. In 2020, the next step will be to trash him with a vast array of full-bore attacks

    Dec 29, 2019 | www.truthdig.com

    A central premise of conventional media wisdom has collapsed. On Thursday, both the New York Times and Politico published major articles reporting that Bernie Sanders really could win the Democratic presidential nomination. Such acknowledgments will add to the momentum of the Bernie 2020 campaign as the new year begins -- but they foreshadow a massive escalation of anti-Sanders misinformation and invective.

    Throughout 2019, corporate media routinely asserted that the Sanders campaign had little chance of winning the nomination. As is so often the case, journalists were echoing each other more than paying attention to grassroots realities. But now, polling numbers and other indicators on the ground are finally sparking very different headlines from the media establishment.

    From the Times : " Why Bernie Sanders Is Tough to Beat ." From Politico : " Democratic Insiders: Bernie Could Win the Nomination ."

    Those stories, and others likely to follow in copycat news outlets, will heighten the energies of Sanders supporters and draw in many wavering voters. But the shift in media narratives about the Bernie campaign's chances will surely boost the decibels of alarm bells in elite circles where dousing the fires of progressive populism is a top priority.

    For corporate Democrats and their profuse media allies, the approach of disparaging and minimizing Bernie Sanders in 2019 didn't work. In 2020, the next step will be to trash him with a vast array of full-bore attacks.

    Along the way, the corporate media will occasionally give voice to some Sanders defenders and supporters. A few establishment Democrats will decide to make nice with him early in the year. But the overwhelming bulk of Sanders media coverage -- synced up with the likes of such prominent corporate flunkies as Rahm Emanuel and Neera Tanden as well as Wall Street Democrats accustomed to ruling the roost in the party -- will range from condescending to savage.

    When the Bernie campaign wasn't being ignored by corporate media during 2019, innuendos and mud often flew in his direction. But we ain't seen nothing yet.

    With so much at stake -- including the presidency and the top leadership of the Democratic Party -- no holds will be barred. For the forces of corporate greed and the military-industrial complex, it'll be all-out propaganda war on the Bernie campaign.

    While reasons for pessimism are abundant, so are ample reasons to understand that a Sanders presidency is a real possibility . The last places we should look for political realism are corporate media outlets that distort options and encourage passivity.

    Bernie is fond of quoting a statement from Nelson Mandela: "It always seems impossible until it is done."

    From the grassroots, as 2020 gets underway, the solution should be clear: All left hands on deck.


    Jan Goslinga • 38 minutes ago ,

    Elections aren't real. Democrats will nominate Joe Biden to lose the election. Trump will remain as fascist strongman and the dems will continue to blame his neoconservative policies on his white trash constituency.

    Bernie serves a few important functions.
    1. he keeps the radicals from leaving the plantation and going 3rd party.
    2. his promotion of progressive policies will make Biden less popular and help him lose to Trump
    3. Bernie and his "socialism" can then be blamed for losing the election to Trump

    Maxwell Jan Goslinga • 15 minutes ago ,

    Unfortunately this comment will be buried in this monstrosity of a thread- now at over 300 comments with only about a third of them having a much relevance.

    You might consider re-posting in reply to one of the foremost comments. Your simple realism will certainly not be well received during the campaign hallucinations.

    I've often wondered how it is people could believe the elections could have any positive and lasting impact on their lives if they have been through a couple of cycles. Do they not also wonder how it is that these election (marketing) campaigns now stretch out for well over a year nowadays demanding everyone's political attention, energy and resources. To say it is a colossal waste does not quite capture the enormity of the mind job being to people.

    Mensch59 Maxwell • 8 minutes ago • edited ,

    Your simple realism will certainly not be well received during the campaign hallucinations.

    Yeah, yeah, sure, sure. You "realists" who are true believers that you have the Truth and have a calling to preach the Truth absolutely must stand against the unwashed masses who claim that your "reality" isn't even intersubjectively verifiable, much less dialectical & material [eta & historical ].

    I quite enjoyed what SteelPirate/LaborSolidarity had to say about you attempting to gain a vanguard following by trolling lib-prog sites.

    Mensch59 Jan Goslinga • 21 minutes ago ,

    Elections aren't real.

    Never pay attention to anyone who claims what's "real" and what isn't. Politics certainly doesn't exist in the realm of an objective, concrete, physical, naturalistic, materialistic reality which is shared by a consensus of rational observers. At best, politics deals with intersubjectively verifiable social phenomena. Thus, politics is mostly idealistic in the belief that each mind generates its own reality.

    This realization is the topic of intersubjective verifiability, as recounted, for example, by Max Born (1949, 1965) Natural Philosophy of Cause and Chance , who points out that all knowledge, including natural or social science, is also subjective. p. 162: "Thus it dawned upon me that fundamentally everything is subjective, everything without exception. That was a shock."
    newestbeginning • 2 hours ago ,

    Meanwhile the wealth of the world's top 500 grew 25% in 2019...

    https://www.livemint.com/ne...

    V4V • 2 hours ago • edited ,

    Noam Chomsky on Bernie Sanders's Chances of Success- "...the chances he can be elected are pretty small." (Waiting with bated breath for copious downvotes by those who hate the truth and hate reality).

    https://cdn.embedly.com/widgets/media.html?src=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fembed%2FEpXJvWSa4FQ%3Ffeature%3Doembed&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DEpXJvWSa4FQ&image=https%3A%2F%2Fi.ytimg.com%2Fvi%2FEpXJvWSa4FQ%2Fhqdefault.jpg&key=21d07d84db7f4d66a55297735025d6d1&type=text%2Fhtml&schema=youtube

    PGGreen V4V • 2 hours ago • edited ,

    Most of who support Sanders know that his presidency will involve an uphill battle. Chomsky is being realistic.

    But there really is no better option for meaningful change working within the political system than supporting Sanders. it is also important to note that "Our Revolution" has energized many young activists, encouraging them to continue the fight. This goes beyond politics to social and economic issues. If Sanders leaves us with a movement, this may turn out to be more important than the presidency in the long run.

    Keep working for effective moral and economic justice and democracy!

    V4V PGGreen • an hour ago ,

    Well, I have said this several times, it's not the microscopic left that you need to convince, it's the majority of self-identifying Democrats not supporting Sanders that you need to convince. I am repelled by the Democratic Party, but there are millions who identify as Democrats and many are proud of it. You need to convince them, not us.

    PGGreen V4V • 21 minutes ago • edited ,

    Yes, although I don't think that those who support a Leftist agenda--whether you actually call them Leftists or not--are quite so microscopic a group as you imply. But you don't need to convince me or most others here (probably) that Sanders isn't perfect, or that it will be difficult for him to be elected president. We already know; we simply consider him the best option within this context of voting.

    Have you ever thought of turning your approach to systemic commentary (which is valid and interesting, BTW, I'm not discounting it) around and saying what candidates you support-- in this context being discussed of voting-- instead of which ones you don't? And then explaining why such support would be effective?

    I would say that what is wrong with the world is more a fault of the economic and political system than of Sanders alone--who not only plays small part in causing what is wrong, but a significant part in trying to correct it. Yes, he works within the system. That is a given. It may be, as Chris Hedges thinks, that there is no hope working within the system. But Noam Chomsky's approach also bears serious consideration that even Hedges doesn't discount. Voting will only be a small part of what brings about change, but it may make some slight difference--if you can stomach it. And it only takes a small amount of time.

    "In a system of immense power, small differences can translate into large outcomes."

    I don't see much of an argument that Sanders will be no better as president than Trump (and if you think so, I'd like to hear you argue it). I suspect you find the compromise unpalatable. I can understand that. I, too, draw the line at a certain point. I couldn't vote for HRC.

    Yes, Sanders isn't perfect. Chomsky also said another important thing: "We're all compromised." Everyone who is a citizen of the US is compromised, and bears some measure of responsibility for the military interventions undertaken by our government. Perhaps we should renounce our citizenship, refuse to pay taxes, etc. But most of us don't -- not even those of us committed to activist work in other ways -- significant ways -- to make things better.

    So what are those ways, for you?

    V4V PGGreen • 6 minutes ago ,

    But you don't need to convince me or most others here (probably) that Sanders isn't perfect

    -for me it isn' that he's not perfect, it's that I think he sucks

    "In a system of immense power, small differences can translate into large outcomes."

    -funny, that's a favorite line of Democrats

    I get that, but it doesn't negate that Sanders's chances are next to nil.

    Your suggestion of me signaling whom I support would fall on deaf ears around here. I have said this many times- I will probably for the Green Party candidate or the Socialist Equality Party candidate. If only a Democrat and Republican appear on the ballot then I would refuse to vote even if I had to pay a fine. I am not in the habit of telling anyone whom to vote for unless asked.

    Before a 3rd can succeed, the fantasy that the fix can come through the Democrats needs to be destroyed. Not to worry, in due time it will be obvious.

    Mensch59 PGGreen • 16 minutes ago ,

    My guess/bet is that V4V believes that the truth "We're all compromised" doesn't apply to him.
    He sees himself as a truth-knower and a truth-teller.
    He won't commit to logical argumentation.
    He'll preach the truth to you.

    Patrick_Walker V4V • 2 hours ago • edited ,

    I saw this video long ago--and agreed with it. But though Sanders' chances are small, they're still vastly larger than the NONEXISTENT chances of success of the purist, "Born to Lose" left. Why not just admit that you've totally given up and simply like to spent your time bitching and criticizing those of us with some (albeit small) hope?

    V4V Patrick_Walker • an hour ago • edited ,

    simply like to spent your time bitching and criticizing those of us with some (albeit small) hope?

    -straw man

    That isn't what I do because I couldn't care less whom Democrats support and vote for. Typically, I post some unpleasant truth about Sanders, like his lackluster polling numbers or his support for neoliberal warmongers and sit back and watch the ad hominems and downvotes roll in. I am not normally on the attack, I am usually on the receiving end.

    I admit that I see this forum as a form of entertainment. I admit I have zero expectation that someone to my liking will be elected president and that the system is going to change anytime soon. Do I believe it possible? Yes, I believe it is possible, I just don't believe it possible using the corrupt, Democratic Party as a vehicle and that's where we differ.

    And that the crux of our issue- you believe the Democratic Party can be used a vehicle to convert the CIA/Wall Street/War Inc. Democrats into the peoples' party, and I do not. If the needed changes are ever to arrive, it will be in spite of the Democrats not because of them. I hope you stick around because in due time I'll be telling you, "Told ya so."

    acme V4V • an hour ago ,

    The problem with your position is that, unlike Sanders, you don't seem to understand that a third candidate party candidate hasn't a snowball's chance in hell of being president unless if s/he somehow gets more electoral votes that both the major parties combined. If not, it goes to the house, and in the current partisan atmosphere, would be decided for the candidate of the House majority.
    The major parties have a death-grip on the presidency while the electoral college exists.

    V4V acme • an hour ago • edited ,

    You don't seem to understand that Sanders has a snowball's chance in hell of being the Democratic Party candidate for many reasons including the DNC arguing in court it is a private corporation and can legally rig primary and the trusty superdelegates for Biden.

    What I propose is a movement outside the Democratic Party in inside it. I believe any attempt to reform the Democratic Party is doomed to fail. All this whistling in the dark over Sanders is a distraction and a kicking the can down the road to the time you Democrats finally realize it isn't going to work. You obviously didn't learn it in 2016, and I would be surprised if you learn it once Sanders tanks and begins campaigning for Biden just like he did Clinton. I will promise this, I'll say, "I told ya so" in a matter of months. That's okay, play it again, Sam.

    Zsuzsi Kruska • 4 hours ago • edited ,

    People believe they need others to tell them what to do and give them the illusion somebody cares about them and has their best interests at heart. That's an archetype in the brain that goes back to our baby/childhood when we were dependent on our caregivers for sustenance, comfort and life itself.That's where the original concept of needing "leaders" comes from. But, what happens is psyco/sociopaths see this weakness in humanity and force their way to the top, to herd and exploit the gullible sheeple for their own agendas and selfish interests. No matter who rises to the top, she/he got their through the same system that's been going on since tribes had their chief; chief's lieutenant and witch doctor/shaman. Those three keep the tribe in line with their own desires. Chief through brute force, his lieutenant through information and witch doctor through religion and "spiritual" services; and all three require tribute and fees from the rest of the tribe. So, you will see, regardless of who the next POTUS will be, that same structure, although more complex today, will repeat itself. New boss/old boss, same ol' same ol'. All power has to be returned to the people at the local level before Wash. starts WWIII. But, if that happens, at least we won't have to worry about global warming with a nuclear winter after the bombs drop.

    [Jan 02, 2020] War of the Worlds: The New Class

    Jan 02, 2020 | medium.com

    "The attempt to isolate the China-Russia-Iran bloc has no way of succeeding and is clearly based on short term profits for the corporations pushing American policy, rather than the health of the economic system as a whole. This is clearly seen in how America is targeting Europe with sanctions over the Nordstream gas pipeline project from Russia to Germany. If you think this is just about the Trump administration you would be wrong, this has bi-partisan support in America and is clearly being pushed by the big banks and corporations with the politicians in both parties being pushed into doing their bidding. This is a huge mistake and like the economic meltdown of 2008 caused by the short-term profiteering of Wall Street greed, we are seeing a far greater mistake being made by the attempt to enforce submission on so many major economic powers. Their obvious reaction is to isolate themselves from American economic reach which means they WILL join the Russia-China-Iran bloc.

    Brzezinski's 2016 advice to bring Russia-China-Iran in from out of the cold was the smart path to follow. It still is. It is THE ONLY way to save the world economy from splitting more and more in ways that adversely affects America more and more and by extension the rest of the world whose economies are tied to America.

    The current leaders of both establishment cliques need to accept that their continuance of the Grand Chessboard strategy is outdated and self-defeating -- and dangerous. It threatens the lives of so many on a daily basis around the world, including Americans. The rise of China and Russia has made a unipolar world impossible unless the Chinese all of a sudden decide to submit to the LIEO. And that is what the American establishment seems to think they can force on them. They hope to wait out Putin to change Russia when he is gone. While that may be possible, what they hope with China is extremely unlikely. China is aggressively courting other nations for partnerships while America is losing more and more respect among the people and leaders of the world."

    Posted by: Kali | Jan 1 2020 19:48 utc | 108

    [Jan 02, 2020] The EU's LNG imports jumped by 102 percent on the year, with Russia accounting for 19 percent of LNG imports, second only to Qatar with 30 percent, and ahead of the U.S. with 12 percent

    Jan 02, 2020 | oilprice.com

    In Q2 2019, thanks to the LNG supply glut and converging prices, the EU's LNG imports jumped by 102 percent on the year, with Russia accounting for 19 percent of LNG imports, second only to Qatar with 30 percent, and ahead of the U.S. with 12 percent, the European Commission's Quarterly Report on European Gas Markets shows .

    Between January and November, LNG imports into Europe including Turkey hit a record high, beating the previous record from 2011, the EIA said in its latest natural gas update. The U.S., Russia, and Qatar boosted their LNG supplies to Europe this year, and the U.S. beat Russia in volumes supplied to Europe in the latter part of the year, EIA data shows.

    While Russia and the U.S. compete for gas market share in Europe, the U.S. hit Russia's Nord Stream 2 project with sanctions this month, delaying the completion of the project with at least several months.

    Following the announcement of the sanctions, Switzerland-based offshore pipelay and subsea construction company Allseas immediately suspended Nord Stream 2 pipelay activities.

    Also

    The agreement between Gazprom and Naftogaz provides for the rejection of new claims, withdrawal of claims, payment by the decision of the Stockholm arbitration-Miller

    MOSCOW, Dec 21-RIA Novosti. Gas transit through Ukraine in 2020 will be 65 billion cubic meters, and 40 billion in 2021-2024, said the Head of "Gazprom" Alexey Miller.

    In turn, the Minister of energy of Ukraine Oleksiy Orzhel noted that the tariff will increase due to a decrease in pumping volumes.

    The agreement provides for the rejection of new claims, the withdrawal of claims and the payment of about 2.9 billion dollars on the decisions of the Stockholm arbitration court.

    In addition, Gazprom and Naftogaz will sign an agreement to settle mutual claims under existing contracts. With Kiev, the Russian company will sign a settlement agreement to withdraw the claim of the Antimonopoly Committee of Ukraine.

    The European Commission in the framework of the new agreement on gas cooperation guarantees the compliance of transit with EU standards, the Ukrainian side-the independence of the regulator, protection of the interests of the transit customer, predictability and economic feasibility of tariff formation.

    MOSCOW, Dec 21-RIA Novosti. "Gazprom" and "Operator of GTS of Ukraine" on Saturday are preparing in Vienna inter-operator agreement signed on Friday between Russia and Ukraine Protocol of the contract on gas transit and settlement of mutual claims is already working, told reporters the representative of "Gazprom".

    [Jan 02, 2020] Since 2008, we've been witnessing a "reverse stagflation", i.e. low unemployment with low wages (a phenomenon which is impossible according to modern bourgeois economic theory).

    Jan 02, 2020 | www.moonofalabama.org

    vk , Dec 31 2019 18:38 utc | 32

    Here's another evidence capitalism has reached a stagnant level of both technological progress and birth rates:

    Over-65s to account for over half of employment growth in next 10 years

    Workers aged 65 and older will be responsible for more than half of all UK employment growth over the next 10 years and almost two-thirds of employment growth by 2060, according to new figures.

    Since 2008, we've been witnessing a "reverse stagflation", i.e. low unemployment with low wages (a phenomenon which is impossible according to modern bourgeois economic theory).

    The reason for this is what I mentioned earlier: no more technological progress and negative birth rates. The USA is still benefitting from mass immigration from Central America, but this demographic bonus won't last for much: now even the Third World countries are barely above the minimum 2 children per woman (including most of Latin American nations). Only a bunch of African nations (which have high mortality rates either way, so it doesn't matter) and India still have the "demographic bonus" in a level such as to be capitalistically viable.

    This problem is not new in cotemporary history. It happened once: in the USSR.

    In the 1970s, only 6% of the Soviet population was necessary to produce everything the USSR needed, so the only solution available was to expand the economy extensively, i.e. by reproducing the same infrastructure more times over.

    The problem with that is that the USSR had reached its limits demographically. Its population growth entered into stagnant to negative territory. Decades passed until the point where it didn't even matter if they came up with a revolutionary technology, since there were simply not enough children to teach and train to such new tech. Add to that the pressure from the Cold War (which drained its R&D to the military sector), and it begun to wither away.

    Now we can predict the same thing is happening to capitalism. Contrary to the USSR, the capitalist nations had the advantage of having available the demographic bonuses of the Third World - specially China - to maintain their dynamism even when some countries like Japan and Germany reached negative birth rates. Now China's demographic bonus is over and also much of Latin America. To make things even worse for the capitalists, China managed to scape the "middle income trap" and go to the route of becoming a superpower, thus adding to the demographic strains of the capitalist center.

    The solution, it seems, is to do pension reforms and force the old people back to work. France is going to destroy its pension system; Brazil already did that; the USA was a pioneer in forcing its old population to work to the death; Italy destroyed its pension system after 2008; the UK is preparing the terrain now that its social-democracy is definitely destroyed.

    Patroklos , Jan 1 2020 2:49 utc | 65

    Posted by: vk | Dec 31 2019 18:38 utc | 32

    As always I find your application of Marxist critique succinct and correct. This coming decade, with its unravelling of the financialization phase of our current phase of capitalism (i.e the US consolidation phase following British imperialism, c.1914-2020s), will be its terminal decade. The signal that we had entered the financialization phase were the shocks of 1970-73, and the replacement of industrial manufacture (i.e. money>commodity>money+x, or M-C-M') with finance/speculation (i.e. money>money+x, M-M') has unfolded more or less according to Marx's analysis in Capital vol.3. This is as much a crisis of value creation as anything else. In Australia (where I am) the process is particularly transparent: we have almost no manufacturing sector left and so we exchange labour-value created in China for mineral resources and engage in the ponzi-scheme of banking and property speculation, which produces no value whatsoever. Either way the M-C-M' phase in Australia has vanished and government dedicates itself to full-spectrum protection of the finance economy and mining. All the while a veneer of productivity is created by immigration, which destroys cities (because there's no infrastructure to accomodate them), inflates prices and creates the illusion of 'growth'. This is propped up by a media who perpetuate xenophobia by creating panic about refugees (5%) while saying zip about the fact that Australia only has economic growth at all because we bring in 250K new consumers every year. This collapsing financialization phase will only accelerate this decade and we will wake to find we don't make anything and have crumbling 1980s-era infrastructure: Australia will suffer badly as the phase plays out, not least because of a colonial-settler looting mentality around the 'economy' that persists at every level of government.

    What I like about the point you're making in your post (#32) is the wider expansive question of productivity -- or, how do we continue to produce value? It is often overlooked that Marx sought to liberate human beings from expropriative labour of every kind (which occurred as much under the Soviets as it does today); this means that capital's aorta connecting labour to value via money must be severed (rather than the endless attempts to reform capitalism to make it 'fairer' etc, a sell-out for which Gramsci savaged the union movement). The relation between work and value must be critiqued relentlessly. To salvage any kind of optimism about the future we need to invest all our intellectual energy in this critique and find a radically new way of construing the link between time, labour and value that does not include social domination.

    In the meantime the scenario to which you have drawn our attention -- the parasitic vampirism now attacking the elderly and the retired -- is an inevitable consequence of our particular moment in late capitalism, hurtling at speed toward a social catastrophe of debt, wealth inequality, neo-feudalism and biopolitical police state, all characterized by an image of 70-year-olds trudging to work in an agony of physical suffering and mental meaninglessness which will end in a forgotten grave.

    [Jan 02, 2020] Gary Shilling Why It's So Hard To Forecast The Economy

    Jan 02, 2020 | www.zerohedge.com

    Gary Shilling: Why It's So Hard To Forecast The Economy by Tyler Durden Wed, 01/01/2020 - 19:00 0 SHARES

    Authored by A.Gary Shilling, op-ed via Bloomberg.com,

    Normal cyclical patterns have gone missing , and may not be coming back anytime soon...

    The U.S. economy has experienced its slowest recovery from a recession in the post-World War II era, and the longer it lasts the more evidence there is that normal cyclical patterns are missing. And their absence means market participants shouldn't rely on them to divine the economy's future.

    Consider the myriad developments that are atypical, or even the reverse of normal economic and financial market behavior. The Federal Reserve shifted from easing credit to tightening following past downturns, with its target federal funds rate normally raised within a year or so of the recession's trough, eventually precipitating the next economic contraction. This time, the central bank kept its policy rate at the recessionary low of essentially zero until Dec. 2015, 78 months into the recovery . And then, after nine quarter-percentage point increases, it reversed course early this year with three rate cuts.

    Far from the Fed's normal worries about an overheating economy and inflation, the central bank frets that low and even declining consumer prices will spawn deflationary expectations. Buyers will hold off in anticipation of lower prices. Inventories and excess capacity will mount, forcing prices down. The price cuts confirm suspicions and purchases are delayed even further, sparking a deflationary spiral. The glaring example is Japan, with deflation in most years in the past two decades and tiny real GDP annual growth of 1.1%.

    Also, despite the plunge in 30-year fixed mortgage rates from 6.8% in July 2006 to the current 3.7%, rate-sensitive single-family housing starts have been muted. They fell from a 1.8 million annual rate in January 2006 to 350,000 in March 2009 as the subprime mortgage market collapsed, but have only recovered to 940,000.

    Mortgage lending criteria have tightened and prime-age first-time homebuyers don't have the necessary downpayments. The net worth of households headed by 18-to-34-year-olds dropped from $120,000 in 2001 to $90,000 in 2016, a 44% decline adjusted for inflation. Also, they learned from the last recession that for the first time since the 1930s, house prices nationwide can fall.

    In past business recoveries, the U.S. household saving rate fell as consumer spending grew faster than incomes. In this expansion, it's the reverse, leaping from 4.9% to 7.9% in November, retarding spending.

    Past postwar recessions spawned financial problems, but nothing like the 2008 crisis. The government's reaction was equally severe with the enactment of the 2010 Dodd-Frank Act and other stringent regulations for financial institutions that are only now being slowly relaxed.

    In earlier business upswings, a drop in the unemployment rate of anything like the plunge from 10% in October 2009 to the current 3.5% would have spawned massive wage inflation. This time, real wages are barely growing.

    Globalization transported many high-paid manufacturing jobs to China. With the growing "on demand" economy -- think Uber Technologies Inc. -- many people trade flexibility in working hours for low pay. The payroll jobs that are being created are mostly in low-wage sectors such as retailing and leisure & hospitality.

    For years, foreign policy was bipartisan and expanding trade was considered highly desirable. Now, globalists have been overcome by protectionists, spurred by voters upset over stagnant purchasing power and rising income and asset inequality in G-7 countries. Trump's 2016 election along with the U.K.'s "Brexit" from the European Union are among the results. Then there's also the demise of global trade deals, which are being replaced by bilateral agreements or no pacts at all.

    The U.S.-China trade dispute will no doubt persist because China, with a declining labor force as a result of its earlier one child-per-couple policy, needs Western technologies to grow and achieve its worldwide leadership ambitions. But the U.S. is opposed to the technology transfers China wants.

    The dollar's slide from 1985 until 2007 encouraged U.S. exports, curbed imports and gave U.S. multinationals currency-related boosts to profits. Since then, the dollar index has rallied 33% amid a global demand for haven assets. And it should continue to, given the relatively faster growth of the U.S. economy, its huge, free and open financial markets and the lack of meaningful substitutes for the greenback.

    Disinflation has reigned since 1980, but real interest rates were positive until the last decade. But for 10 years now, real 10-year Treasury note yields have been flat at zero (see my Nov. 19, 2018 column, "Zero Real Yields Are Tripping Up Investors"). This and the flat yield curve have pushed state pension funds and other investors far out on the risk curve in search of real returns, bidding up stocks to vulnerable levels.

    Earlier, the Fed was run by Ph.D. economists who clung to widely-held theories even though they didn't work. Fed Chairman Jerome Powell is proving to be much more practical, backing away from rigid Fed policies such as the 2% inflation target and a zero-bound policy rate as well as unsuccessful forward guidance.

    In this different economic climate, it's hard to time the end of the current recovery. Still, it will end, due either to Fed overtightening or a financial crisis, like the 2000 dot-com blow-off or the 2007-2009 subprime mortgage collapse. In the current excess supply-savings glut-deflationary world, it's likely a recession will unfold due to a shock before the Fed overtightens.

    No financial crises are in sight, but there are possibilities such as excess debt in China and among U.S. businesses, a trade war escalation, consumer retrenchment resulting in widespread deflation, and disappointing corporate profits measured against sky-high stock prices. Watch for specific imbalances, not typical past patterns.

    [Jan 01, 2020] Financial oligarchy is a cancer and Jewish financial oligarchy is just the most abhorrent flavor of it

    Notable quotes:
    "... I don't even know what capitalism means anymore. It doesn't seem like it's an actual free market system. Seems like it is slavery for the little guy, and parasitism for the rich. Maybe we should ditch the word capitalism for usuryism. ..."
    "... That scary thought has crossed my mind, too, Art. I've even started wondering if this whole impeachment circus is really part of an elaborate plot to guarantee Trump's re-election. I mean, would Pelosi's insane actions make the slightest sense otherwise? And everyone has noted how this is such a 'Jew coup,' haven't they? It all looks so suspicious ..."
    "... It looks like it was Browder who killed Magnitsky, so that he can't spill the beans. And then in an act of ultimate chutzpah played the victim and promoted Magnitsky act. ..."
    Jan 01, 2020 | www.unz.com

    Mulegino1 says: December 19, 2019 at 5:08 pm GMT 300 Words @J Adleman

    You and other whites here are like the bad guys in every horror movie ever made, who gets shot five times, or stabbed ten, or blown up twice, and who will eventually pass -- even if it takes four sequels to make it happen -- but who in the meantime keeps coming back around, grabbing at our ankles as we walk by, we having been mistakenly convinced that you were finally dead this time. Fair enough, and have at it. But remember how this movie ends. Our ankles survive.
    YOU DO NOT.

    Talk about deflection. Any nation, empire, culture or civilization wherein the Jewish collective gains critical mass and ultimately absolute power turns into a real horror, not a movie. The Jews may be said to be the true prototype of the "bad guys in every horror movie", since they can only be gotten rid of by very rigorous means taken in the healthiest and most vigorous cultures and societies. Indeed, antisemitism itself is the healthy immunological reaction of a flourishing culture, and its lack thereof the pathology of a moribund one.

    Woke Christians of European provenance have nothing to envy the Jew (the archetypal Jew) over. We realize that the true measure of success is not primarily monetary or the fulfillment of cheap ambitions, but a spiritual and cultural one. On the contrary, the Jewish hatred against Christian Europe and the civilization that it constructed is engendered out of sheer envy and malice, because Jewry understands that is would never be capable of constructing anything similar, and never has. In all of the arts, Jewry has produced nothing of note.

    This is not to say that individual Jews have not made contributions to the arts and sciences, but they have done so only by participation in gentile culture, not qua Jews. Jewry only tears down and deconstructs; it is not creative in the sense of high art, and can thrive only in the swamp of gentile decadence and moral putrefaction. Whatever Jewry touches, it turns to merde.

    Ilya G Poimandres , says: December 19, 2019 at 5:09 pm GMT

    @Anon specifically push them away from materialism and desire for money and power, even at the expense of others. That is the exact point of religion (self-improvement) btw, so the next question is – is the Jewish religion effective?

    At which point, the Jewish ideology becomes the wolf in the hen house – because it fails to tame the human away from such materialistic desire (as it btw claims it does best).

    Should the hens be allowed to point out what they see as a wolf? Yes.

    That the supposed wolf then obfuscates and justifies their actions by pointing to others, mostly, betrays that it is, in fact, a wolf.

    Rebel0007 , says: December 19, 2019 at 5:11 pm GMT

    I have become totally disenchanted with the SEC. Stupid, Evil, Crazy! It would not surprise me if they are the ones that have been terrorizing me, with stupid, evil, crazy chants through appliances after illegallly implaced RFIDs, microchips, or sensors illegally implanted in my ears and nose that started after my first phone was hacked in 2017! Can't expect stupid people not to be stupid, evil people not to be evil, and crazy people not to be crazy! They were just born that way!

    9/11 Inside job , says: December 19, 2019 at 5:25 pm GMT
    @J Adleman

    brookings.edu :

    "The US will become minority white in 2045 Census projects " :

    "During that year [2045] whites will comprise 49.7 per cent of the population in contrast to 24.6 per cent for Hispanics , 13.1 per cent for Blacks , 7.9 per cent for Asians and 3.8 per cent for multi-racial populations " Are these projections good or bad for the "Jewish people " ?

    Agent76 , says: December 19, 2019 at 5:33 pm GMT

    Jan 28, 2010 The Creature From Jekyll Island (by G. Edward Griffin)

    A Second Look at the Federal Reserve

    https://www.youtube.com/embed/lu_VqX6J93k?feature=oembed

    Nov 22, 2013 Thomas DiLorenzo – The Revolution Of 1913

    From the Tom Woods show Loyola economics professor Thomas DiLorenzo discusses three events from 1913 that greatly escalated the transmogrification of America from the founder's vision (limited government) to its current state (unlimited government).

    https://www.youtube.com/embed/Fj4HyL8pOy0?feature=oembed

    Robjil , says: December 19, 2019 at 5:39 pm GMT
    @Onebornfree 001. It just as murderous as the first Zion century.

    If we had a free press that calls out the Jewish Zion Mafia that in itself would solve the problem.

    This Zion Mafia is destroying our planet faster than any Climate Change or any pollution.

    Yet, we can not speak about it. It is anti-S to speak about what the Big Js do.

    Onebornfree, the J mafia roams the world without being bound to any nation. A nation-less world would not stop their menace.

    The best way to stop this world wide menace is free speech to talk about it. Usury control is the next step to end this menace to our planet.

    More R1b, Less H1B , says: December 19, 2019 at 5:45 pm GMT
    @Lot sons of Abraham name their businesses after themselves (I'm sure this will insincerely be attributed to some fear of native kulaks' repressed urge-to-pogrom, even in Finland or Japan.) The other is an observation made by an associate of a famous Austrian landscapist: even merely remarking on their origins causes these guys mental distress.

    Here in the melting pot, the difference couldn't be any starker. You can make small talk with any flavor of goy based on it: that's a Polish name, isn't it? Yeah, how did you know! Try this one with Levy or Nussbaum down at The Smith Group or The Jones Foundation and watch them plotz.

    Mefobills , says: December 19, 2019 at 5:51 pm GMT

    Jews have always weaponized usury. Long before Christianity, Jews operated the East/West mechanism on donkey caravan trade routes. Silver would drain from the West, and Gold would drain from the east, while Jewish caravaneers would take usury on exchange rate differences. This operated for thousands of years.

    Haibaru donkey bones have been discovered outside of Sumer. The Aiparu/Haibaru (Hebrew) tribes were formed as merchants operating between city states. In those days, psychopaths and criminals would be excommunicated from civilized city states, and would take up with the wandering merchant tribe.

    Why do you think the Jew is always interested in owing the money power? Why do you think the Jew perpetually stands outside the walls of the city state, plotting its destruction?

    History tells us things, and we had better listen. That is – real history, not what you learned in (((public skool))). There are two ways to deal with the Jew: 1) Remove him from your country. 2) Limit him.

    Limiting was done by Byzantium under Justinian. The Jew was limited FROM money counting/banking; limited from participation in government; limited from access to pervert young minds – especially as school teachers and professors.

    It takes a King or Tsar who cares about his population, and is willing to eject or filter out toxins from the body politic. (((Democracy))) is a failed form of government, whereby monied Oligarchs control the polity by compromat and pulling strings.

    You are not going to be able to vote your way out of the Jew problem.

    Digital Samizdat , says: December 19, 2019 at 6:01 pm GMT
    @Colin Wright

    Echoing words once supposedly used by Hermann Goering: whenever I here the word 'philanthropist' these days, I instinctively reach for my revolver!

    Agent76 , says: December 19, 2019 at 6:03 pm GMT

    Jan 23, 2012 Why the Constitution Had to Be Destroyed | Thomas J. DiLorenzo

    Archived from the live Mises tv broadcast, this lecture was presented by Tom DiLorenzo at the Mises Circle in Houston on 14 January 2012.

    https://www.youtube.com/embed/wDyDxgJuaDY?feature=oembed

    Mefobills , says: December 19, 2019 at 6:07 pm GMT
    @Ilya G Poimandres edina. Ergo, Wahabbi Islam and the Takfiri's are doctrinaly correct, while Judaizer Christians (those that worship the old testament) are out of alignment and heretics.

    Judaism is actually a new religion that came into being after 73 AD, when the verbal tradition (Caballa) became written down into Talmud.

    Our Jewish friends have always been practicing usury, going back to since forever.

    Our Jewish friends, I count as worse that Islamics. However two wrongs don't make a right. Islam badly needs reform or to be expunged. Talmudic Judaism is by far the worst religion on the planet, and its adherents must malfunction by definition.

    Robjil , says: December 19, 2019 at 6:18 pm GMT
    @9/11 Inside job

    Jewish bigwigs think that the world will be their oyster if there are less White Euros in the world.

    Yet, Jewish Advisors have been at the top of white Euro nations for centuries as their oyster to pillage the planet.

    Non-White Euro people may not be so welcoming to Jewish Advisors at the top telling to them to go to war or pillage their fellow non-White Euros.

    I don't think that the big Jews at the top thought this out too much.

    Mefobills , says: December 19, 2019 at 6:20 pm GMT
    @Onebornfree You are missing something because you are unwilling to adapt and learn with new information. This makes you an ideologue.

    Libertarianism IS A JEWISH CONSTRUCT.

    There are no such things as free markets. Money's true nature is law, not gold. Money didn't come into being with barter and other nonsense lolbertarians believe.

    Most of the luminaries that came up with "libertarian" economics are Jews, and it is a doctrine of deception. The idea is to confuse the goyim with thoughts and ideas that make them easy pickings.

    A determined in-group of predators operating in unison, will take down an "individual" every-time.

    Rebel0007 , says: December 19, 2019 at 6:30 pm GMT

    Don't expect anything to improve with Jay Clayton as SEC Chair, and his wife and her father Gretchen Butler Clayton who was CEO of CSC and mysterious WMB Holdings which share the same address in addition to many Goldman Sachs divisions. Gretchen was employed by Goldman Sachs as an attorney from 1999-2017. Many companies affiliated with the Panama Papers share the same address as well.

    Secrecy has expanded under Clayton.

    https://wallstreetonparade.com/2018/01/wall-streets-top-cop-cant-shake-money-ties-to-mysterious-firm/

    alex in San Jose AKA digital Detroit , says: December 19, 2019 at 6:34 pm GMT

    Jewish people have treated me better than my own White Euro family.

    Jews are tribal, gee what a surprise after 1000's of years of people trying to wipe them out . and so their charity is within the tribe, but there is no charity within the tribe among Whites.

    Jews, along with Asians and at least some Africans, believe in not just climbing the ladder, but in actually helping others – at least family – up it also. Whites believe in climbing the ladder and then pulling it up after them.

    I was explaining to a friend recently: My (relative) has proven that if I showed up at their door, starving, they'd not give me a cheese sandwich, while in my experience, strangers have been overall a fairly kind lot and a stranger, 50/50, might. Therefore, while I find the idea of robbing or burning down the house of a stranger abhorrent, I don't mind the idea so much when it involves a person who's proven to be cold and evil.

    For more on this, see the book Angela's Ashes. The Irish family could have stayed in New York where they were being befriended by a Jewish family. There was a ray of hope. The Irish kids, at least, would have been fed, steered into decent schooling, etc. But foolishly they went back to Ireland, to be treated like utter dogshit by their fellow White family and "people".

    Most of the predation going on in the US and worldwide is being done by WASPS who are using Jews as a convenient scapegoat.

    Digital Samizdat , says: December 19, 2019 at 6:36 pm GMT
    @tono bungay

    Feel free to offer us some counter-examples, tono. How many such funds to you know of that aren't disproportionately Jewish? We're all ears!

    Digital Samizdat , says: December 19, 2019 at 7:01 pm GMT

    Finally! An intelligent criticism of Trump for a change. So tired of the brainless Democrat/MSM impeachment circus. They make me feel like a reflexive MAGAtard just for defending the constitution, logic, etc., from their never-ending stream of inanities. Meanwhile, the real problem with Trump is not that he's Hitler; it's that he's not Hitler enough!

    I am also so tired of Zionist-loving cucks bleeting on about the evils of the CRA without ever considering the role played by the (((profiteers))) who lobbied such policies into law in the first place. Realize that what Paul Singer does for a living used to be illegal in this country up until recently. That's right: US bankruptcy law used to forbid investors from buying up debt second-hand at a discount and then trying to reclaim the entire face value from the debtor. But I see all kinds of people even on this thread blaming the victim instead -- 'Damn goyishe deadbeats!' Whatever

    What Singer and the other Jewish vultures engage in is not productive, and isn't even any recognisable form of work or business. It is greed-motivated parasitism carried out on a perversely extravagant and highly nepotistic scale. In truth, it is Singer and his co-ethnics who believe that money can be printed on the backs of productive workers, and who ultimately believe they have a right to be "showered by free stuff promised by politicians."

    Nuff said?

    renfro , says: December 19, 2019 at 7:16 pm GMT
    @anon maintain your honor, and manners and still succeed. Jews take the easy low road of deception and cheating. WASP take the higher road of harder work and ethical business practice.

    WALL STREET'S LAST GENTLEMAN, Richard Jenrette

    https://www.nytimes.com/1984/11/18/business/wall-street-s-last-gentleman-richard-jenrette-forging-the-equitable-connection.html

    [MORE]
    the grand wazoo , says: December 19, 2019 at 7:19 pm GMT

    "Permit me to issue and control the money of a nation and I" care not who makes its laws"

    That is what Mayer Amschel Rothchild said in the 1750s. Now, is it a stretch of my imagination to believe the Central Banks of the West, all Jewish controlled, would unfairly favor their 'own' when issuing or disbursing the money they are permitted to create.

    We are not allowed to audit the Federal Reserve, so we know not what they do with it beyond what they tell us. In 2016 it was discovered that between the year 1999 and 2016 well over $23 trillions had been stolen from just 2 departments of our government, the DoD and HUD. (Someone should look at NASA). Is it possible the seed money, for not only Venture capitalists schemes but also buying governments and law makers, has been diverted, shoveled out of the back door of these corrupt central banks and into the hands of their fellow jews?
    Anyway, the more exposure articles like this get the closer we get to ending their reign.

    Ilya G Poimandres , says: December 19, 2019 at 7:28 pm GMT
    @Mefobills he pressure will only be towards violence – for any nation or faith!

    Judaism has monopolized for millennia though, and still acts as a victim. Different kettle of fish.

    Also, you can debate the positives and negatives of Islam with a Muslim (not as a rabid ignoramus of course – you must be polite, and have learnt something, as well as be open to learning more). Almost every debate with a Jew about Judaism has started with, continued with, and ended with name calling for me however.

    Judaism fails as a religion because it does not encourage the practitioner to look at themselves when confronted with error, Islam still does imo.

    Colin Wright , says: Website December 19, 2019 at 7:31 pm GMT

    So I scanned through the posts quickly -- probably too quickly.

    How many specific, gentile vulture capitalists currently prominent in the field have been named so far?

    When you list them, please respond to my post so that I will be notified.

    anarchyst , says: December 19, 2019 at 7:34 pm GMT
    @Colin Wright

    Your statement: "Jews actually collaborated extensively in the imposition of tyranny on the working class in Eastern Europe from 1917 to 1991" not only applies to Europe, but the united States of America as well.

    Mark Hunter , says: Website December 19, 2019 at 7:41 pm GMT

    1. Re Sidney, Nebraska: Maybe I'm missing something but wasn't it Cabela's owners, for example co-founder and chairman Jim Cabela, who sold Cabela, not Elliot Management (Singer et al)? I gather Elliot Management owned only 11% of the company. Was that enough to force them to sell?

    2. The article confuses honest straightforward loans with tax farming and government corruption. Loans can be very useful, e.g. for a car to get to a job, or for a house so you build up equity instead of paying rent.

    Digital Samizdat , says: December 19, 2019 at 7:55 pm GMT
    @BannedHipster

    According to the Talmud, we goyim are not the descendants of Adam and Eve, like the Jews. No, we are the bastard progeny of Adam's first wife, Lilleth, who eloped with the demon Samael. So we goyim are really all half-demons and therefore we are an abomination in the sight of Jew-hova, and we get what we deserve at the hands of his 'chosen people'.

    All clear now?

    .

    Art , says: December 19, 2019 at 8:03 pm GMT
    @Colin Wright to get carried away with this. Figures such as Andrew Carnegie, while impeccably gentile, were hardly paragons of scrupulous ethics and disinterested virtue.

    Andrew Carnegie built something that made life better for people. Making steel is a beneficial thing.

    These evil vulture Jews build nothing – they make people poorer. They suck the wealth out of people who have little. They know 100% what they are doing.

    Jesus expressed anger against the money changers on the temple steps.

    It is OK for you to have natural human feelings and be angry at these Jew bastards.

    Do No Harm

    Art , says: December 19, 2019 at 8:08 pm GMT

    Major Kudos to these three heroes – Ron Unz, Tucker Carlson, and Andrew Joyce – for this article and discussion.

    tomo , says: December 19, 2019 at 8:16 pm GMT
    @anon ith him on this trip. It was an awful experience – consistent with all the books I read on psychopaths and also that book Jewish History, Jewish Religion, the weight of 3000 years

    Another very wealthy American mother of a friend asked her South African friends (also jews) to help her book trips in South Africa (and they of course recommended only their Jewish friends) – it's their son who told me this.
    So a lot of backstabbing, cultural nepotism and actively (but in a hidden way as most psychopaths like to do) they do at wakening and isolating their host. That's their only advantage – not intelligence (at least in my experience )

    Old and grumpy , says: December 19, 2019 at 8:22 pm GMT
    @DaveE

    I don't even know what capitalism means anymore. It doesn't seem like it's an actual free market system. Seems like it is slavery for the little guy, and parasitism for the rich. Maybe we should ditch the word capitalism for usuryism.

    the grand wazoo , says: December 19, 2019 at 8:27 pm GMT
    @Realist

    No, not stupid whites, they're not to blame. It's the greedy corrupt politician: white, black, or white jew, who are to blame.

    Mefobills , says: December 19, 2019 at 8:31 pm GMT
    @Ilya G Poimandres o – including offensive war. I used the term political authority on purpose, because Islam is more than just a religion, it is a political-theocratic construct that is all-encompassing.

    There may not be a specific verse allowing aggressive violence, but there is something going on based on the data. (I admit to being a lay-man and not an expert on minutia of Islam. I don't want to go there based on what I already know to be true.)

    In Christianity, if there are calls for aggressive violence it is OUT OF ALIGNMENT because of super-session. Christian adherents who do this are Judaizers, and have to use the old testament for justification.

    annamaria , says: December 19, 2019 at 8:43 pm GMT
    @Ghali

    'Everywhere they go, they leave behind nations in ruins. "

    -- They always find the willing local collaborators ready to make a big profit. Who can forget Dick Cheney, the Enemy of Humanity? The same kind of unrestricted criminality and amorality lives on in Tony Blair the Pious.

    The fact that this Catholic weasel and major criminal Tony Blair is still not excommunicated tells all we need to know about the Vatican.

    Assange is rotting in a prison, while Tony Blair and Ghislaine Maxwell are roaming free. The Jewish connections pay off.

    Anon [271] Disclaimer , says: December 19, 2019 at 8:59 pm GMT
    @J Adelman s as "strong advocates for a robust and close relationship with Ukraine," the Democratic senators declared, "We have supported [the] capacity-building process and are disappointed that some in Kyiv appear to have cast aside these [democratic] principles to avoid the ire of President Trump," before demanding Lutsenko "reverse course and halt any efforts to impede cooperation with this important investigation

    And yet Trump pulls the Jews ever closer. A ruling race of ubermenschen now.

    'No reason'.

    Can you imagine what American Blacks and savage Hispanics let alone whites are going to do if the US economy craters like the Russian economy, and everything is transferred to the banks?

    DaveE , says: December 19, 2019 at 9:00 pm GMT
    @Old and grumpy

    Yeah . fine idea. I've always maintained there are two uses of the word "capitalism" industrial capitalism or competition of ideas vs. financial capitalism, the Darwinian struggle for the most ruthless bankster to rig the "markets" most efficiently.

    Whether we give it new terminology I don't care much . but I sure wish people would understand the difference, one way of another !

    Mefobills , says: December 19, 2019 at 9:05 pm GMT
    @alex in San Jose AKA digital Detroit as extended, and had aunts and uncles and cousins, who lived in the general area for centuries, then there would be a network to fall back on.

    See slaughter of the cities by Jones:

    And yes, the FIRE sector and impetus behind the destruction of your extended family was JEWISH. The breakdown of neighborhoods and ethnics was on purpose.

    The Jew is anti-logos, and whatever he touches he destroys. (There are exceptions of course – but these people no longer possess a negative Jewish spirit.)

    Sorry your family was destroyed. When whites become un-moored they don't know how to act.

    Father O'Hara , says: December 19, 2019 at 9:06 pm GMT
    @J Adleman

    Quite bizarre post. First,he makes a half ass defense of Jew character.(Weinstein, Epstein don't represent jews! Well, they kind of do. Any jew who is called to accounts for his crimes automatically does not represent jews! )

    Antares , says: December 19, 2019 at 9:06 pm GMT
    @Anon

    if you think it's wrong to buy or try to collect on defaulted debt, what is the alternative set of laws and behavior you are recommending? If debts can simply be repudiated at will, capitalism cannot function.

    Capitalism includes money. You can't separate the risks in lending from other risks. Bad investors should be punished and good investors rewarded. Resources should be well allocated. Otherwise it's not capitalism.

    Happy Tapir , says: December 19, 2019 at 9:12 pm GMT
    @Rebel0007

    I looked at his book on amazon. Do you believe all that stuff? Are these people with psychoses or delusional disorders?

    Anon [271] Disclaimer , says: December 19, 2019 at 9:12 pm GMT

    https://www.trunews.com/stream/jew-coup-seditious-jews-orchestrating-trump-impeachment-lynching

    These insane Boomers seem to think that there is a Jewish coup underway to remove Trump because of all the things that Jews are saying in Jewish publications and every single person involved being Jewish and stuff.

    Adrian , says: December 19, 2019 at 9:20 pm GMT
    @Germanicus About the Carnegie donated "Peace Palace" in The Hague, presently the seat of the In ternational Court of Justice:

    Germanicus claims:

    They are a function of Empire in Hague, who protect empire criminals, and assume a non existent legitimacy and jurisdiction as a private entity to take down empire opponents.

    Such as this ruling for instance:

    Guardian 3 Oct.2018:

    International court of justice orders US to lift new Iran sanctions

    Mike Pompeo indicates US will ignore ruling, after judges in The Hague find unanimously in favor of Iran

    Informed Reader , says: December 19, 2019 at 9:21 pm GMT
    @Colin Wright

    Colin Wright: Tel Aviv University's Medical School is called the "Sackler Faculty of Medicine." Does that help answer your question?

    annamaria , says: December 19, 2019 at 9:24 pm GMT
    @silviosilver

    "What Joyce regards as a defect of "vulture" funds, others might regard as an benefit. "

    -- Of course. I hope you did not miss the fact that the Jewish vulture funds -- ruthless, unethical, and leaching on goyim -- contribute to the Jewish Holocaust Museum.

    Is not it touching that the same bloody destroyers of nations demand from the same nations a very special reverence -- out of ethical considerations, of course -- towards the Jewish victims of WWII? But only Jewish victims.

    All others were not victims but casualties. See Iraq, Syria, Libya, and Ukraine. See the unlimited hatred of ziocons towards Russia.

    utu , says: December 19, 2019 at 9:25 pm GMT
    @Anonymous

    " but maybe a few leftist thinkers would receive a much needed electric shock if they were to see the JQ framed in marxist terms " – I would not count on the effect of the electric shock on the leftist thinkers. The role of Jewish Bolsheviks in the Cheka, NKVD, GULAGs, genocides by famine has been known from the very beginning and yet it left no impact on the leftist thinkers.

    Anon [271] Disclaimer , says: December 19, 2019 at 9:33 pm GMT

    Browder's case is really interesting. http://www.ihr.org /jhr/v17/v17n6p13_Michaels.html

    "According to Harvard University scholar Graham Allison, who is also a former US assistant Secretary of Defense, ordinary Russians have experienced, on average, a 75 percent plunge in living standards since 1991 -- almost twice the decline in Americans' income during the Great Depression of the 1930s. But in the midst of this widespread economic misery, a small minority has grown fabulously wealthy since the end of the Soviet era."

    "Although Jews make up no more than three or four percent of Russia's population, they wield enormous economic and political power in that vast and troubled country. "At least half of the powerful 'oligarchs' who control a significant percentage of the economy are Jewish," the Los Angeles Times has cautiously noted. (See also: D. Michaels, "Capitalism in the New Russia," May-June 1997 Journal, pp. 21-27.)"

    It's interesting how the appeal of Eduard Topol to Jews in Russia is now starting to echo Jewish calls in the United States for Jews to stop the path they are currently on.

    Here is the complete text of Topol's extraordinary "Open Letter to Berezovksy, Gusinsky, Smolensky, Khodorkovsky and other Oligarchs," translated for the Journal by Daniel Michaels from the text published in the respected Moscow paper Argumenty i Fakty ("Arguments and Facts"), No. 38, September 1998:

    https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-07-21/guardians-magnitsky-myth-will-real-bill-browder-please-step-forward

    Magnitsky and Bill Browder is also really interesting.

    It turns out that a large measure of the Russiagate story arose because Russian lawyer Natalia Veselnitskaya, who traveled to America to challenge Browder's account, arranged a meeting with Donald Trump Jr. and other Trump campaign advisers in June 2016 to present this other side of the story.

    Apparently that's collusion.

    But this isn't collusion.

    https://www.nationalreview.com/2017/08/left-red-scare-democrats-suddenly-hate-russia/

    Remember when Obama literally said he would sell out US defence interests to the Russians on a hot mic?

    https://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2019/10/corrupt_senators_took_ukraine_cash.html

    Then we had Democrats actually literally word for word doing what they accuse Trump of doing in Ukraine.

    "It got almost no attention, but in May [2018], CNN reported that Sens. Robert Menendez (D-N.J.), Richard J. Durbin (D-Ill.) and Patrick J. Leahy (D-Vt.) wrote a letter to Ukraine's prosecutor general, Yuriy Lutsenko, expressing concern at the closing of four investigations they said were critical to the Mueller probe. In the letter, they implied that their support for U.S. assistance to Ukraine was at stake. Describing themselves as "strong advocates for a robust and close relationship with Ukraine," the Democratic senators declared, "We have supported [the] capacity-building process and are disappointed that some in Kyiv appear to have cast aside these [democratic] principles to avoid the ire of President Trump," before demanding Lutsenko "reverse course and halt any efforts to impede cooperation with this important investigation."

    What's the first rule of Communist and Satanist Saul Alinsky? Always accuse your opponents of what you are doing.

    Imagine having a Grandfather as the literal Chairman of the American Communist Party, and all the amazing lessons you would learn about political maneuvering and ideology.

    And it's amazing.

    Browder's story is that Russian officials stole his companies seals and then fraudulently formulated a tax avoidance scheme with a complete paper trail that they fabricated against him in totem. Precisely matching the amount of money he was trying to remove from their country, like those other Jewish Oligarchs who imposed conditions that were multiples worse then even the American depression.

    When under oath it turns out that Magnitsky wasn't even a lawyer at all, and didn't go to law school. Why did the media owned by Mormons of course keep saying that Magnitsky was Browder's lawyer?

    Why did the Russians fraudulently fabricate a paper-trail for another Jewish Oligarch to steal money out of Russia? Just like they colluded with Trump when a Russian lawyer sought to explain what happened. Because that totally happened.

    Maybe the problem isn't Capitalism. Maybe, when even the ur-Shabbos goys at National Review are shaking their head and washing their hands like Pilate, maybe it's a different problem.

    Yet Trump holds these people ever close to his beating heart.

    And then there are all these connections to Jeffrey Epstein that are like an explosion linking all these people.

    Poor old Russia. Even Putin isn't worse then what came before.

    renfro , says: December 19, 2019 at 9:50 pm GMT
    @Anonymous

    t class is not tied to any territory has been observable since 1960.

    I don't have time now to look up how many of 199 directors are Jews . but I know enough of the economic history of various countries to know that Jews were the first business and finance globe trotters,,,,.from Spain to Amsterdam, France to Africa , etc.etc. Jew were first hired as reps and facilitators by the gentile business owners especially because of their breather tribal contacts in many countries ..that was their stepping stone to becoming transnational capitalist themselves.

    Understanding our global capitalist ruling elite and who they are is not rocket science

    steinbergfeldwitzcohen , says: December 19, 2019 at 9:54 pm GMT

    Yet more evidence is piling up that Donald J Trump is the Great Betrayer. A man who had the biggest mandate in post war history to clean up the Swamp that is D.C., reform Immigration to save America and reform the economy for American workers. He has squandered all of it while pandering to Jews.

    When the Donald is revealed as the Great Betrayer where will Jews run? Yes, they have several back up plans. Patagonia, Ukraine and Israel.

    Imagine that. They have their own country and 2 back up plans. It is really tough being a hated, oppressed minority.

    JUSA , says: December 19, 2019 at 9:59 pm GMT
    @Lot

    being much more cautious in their borrowing since the borrowing cost is so high.

    Instead, this current arrangement basically uses bond funds to put up a false front, telling a debtor they can borrow at 2% when the real rate should be at 20% given the known risks, then the debtor goes crazy borrowing because it's so cheap to borrow, and when they can't pay back, the bond gets sold to the vultures who come collecting at 20% or they seize assets.

    This is no different than the subprime mortgage crap, except now that is regulated so they go after sovereign debt and corporate debt instead. These vultures need to go die period.

    bike-anarkist , says: December 19, 2019 at 10:16 pm GMT
    @Jimmy1969

    This is a great, concise overview of Canadian media influence by the "silent" Jewish overlords via Golden Tree.

    I tried copy/paste of your comment on CBC, but it did NOT last 2minutes before being suspended!!

    I am sorry to have used your comment without your permission, but I am going to "misspell" some words to defeat the algorithm to get your message across.

    Anon [112] Disclaimer , says: December 19, 2019 at 10:27 pm GMT
    @Lot e, and these golfy-sounding names (Elliot, Monarch, GoldTree, OakTree, Canyon, Tilden Park) fit the perception. We whites receive the society's hate for the wealth disparities created by high finance.

    4. No, it is not difficult to do finance differently. Every other investor has higher patience for poor countries in Central America and Africa, and they all look at Elliot with confused scorn.

    And, things would probably run fine without hyper-aggressive multi-billionaires in pushing the courts to f- over those who default on debts they owe to the maximum degree. Japan and Norway do quite fine with businesses that are run by gentle and humble goys who feel ashamed at the thought of getting "too rich."

    steinbergfeldwitzcohen , says: December 19, 2019 at 10:27 pm GMT
    @J Adleman

    You will be thrown out.
    You will have to choose between Israel, Ukraine and Patagonia. No one else will take you.
    You have destroyed our politics, media and economy.
    You are not respected.
    You buy compliance with money.
    You have bankrupted the U.S. dollar with debt pursuing Israel's enemies.

    You should pack.
    Real Soon.
    Good Riddance.

    Anon [112] Disclaimer , says: December 19, 2019 at 10:31 pm GMT
    @Just passing through

    I accept the guilt for what whites have done in the past.

    But whites have become incredibly generous and gentle with the Other. We have turned in the opposite direction, we are not the same.

    Great Britain gave up many of its colonies with no fight. Kenya was given up before there was even an anti-colonial movement in Kenya!

    We whites are fair-players, and we respect the right of other peoples to self-determination. We haven't in the past, but we have learned.

    thotmonger , says: December 19, 2019 at 11:02 pm GMT

    Ben Franklin and the American revolution was almost put in a similar pinch by the Amsterdam banker Jean DeNeufville. In a letter to John Adams, 14 December 1781*, Franklin explained that DeNeufville wanted as security for a loan "all the lands, cities, territories, and possessions of the said Thirteen States, which they may have or possess at present, and which they may have or possess in the future, with all their income, revenue, and produce, until the entire payment of this loan and the interests due thereon."

    Franklin considered that "extravagant" but Newhouse rejoined, "this was usual in all loans and that the money could not otherwise be obtained". Franklin retold in this lengthy letter, "Besides this, I was led to understand that it would be very agreeable to these gentlemen if, in acknowledgment of their zeal for our cause and great services in procuring this loan, they would be made by some law of Congress the general consignee of America, to receive and sell upon commission, by themselves and correspondents in the different ports and nations, all the produce of America that should be sent by our merchants to Europe."

    Talk about shooting the moon

    While Wikipedia says DeNeufville was Mennonite, Franklin concluded with this colorful -- and bitter -- remark , "By this time, I fancy, your Excellency is satisfied that I was wrong in supposing John de Neufville as much a Jew as any in Jerusalem, since Jacob was not content with any per cents, but took the whole of his brother Esau's birthright, and his posterity did the same by the Canaanites, and cut their throats into the bargain; which, in my conscience, I do not think Mr. John de Neufville has the least inclination to do by us while he can get any thing by our being alive. I am, with the greatest esteem, etc., ✪ B. Franklin."

    Perhaps it was just an expression based on an earlier stereotype?

    *Bigelow, 1904. The Works of Benjamin Franklin, Vol. 9 Letters and Misc. Writings

    Mefobills , says: December 19, 2019 at 11:08 pm GMT
    @steinbergfeldwitzcohen o to Uganda and Ugandans were willing, but NO Zion had to have Palestine, and they got it through war, deception, and murder. It was funded by usury, as stolen purchasing power from the Goyim.

    The fake country of Israel, is not the biblical Israel, and it came into being by maneuverings of satanic men determined to get their way no matter what, and is supported by continuous deception. Even today's Hebrew is resurrected from a dead language, and is fake. Many fake Jews (who have no blood lineage to Abraham), a fake country, and fake language. These fakers, usurers, and thieves do indeed have their eyes set on Patagonia, what they call the practical country.

    Anonymous [147] Disclaimer , says: December 19, 2019 at 11:08 pm GMT
    @Digital Samizdat feel this makes me weird.

    I've been to TOO. However I can't bring myself to start commenting on a white nationalist website. I will admit I am unable to articulate this discomfort presently.

    As to your point about Marx – I actually forgot about his work on the JQ. The Saker, who is a columnist on this site, referenced Marx's essay on the JQ some time ago. I must have not read the whole thing or I'd have remembered it. I didn't know that Marxism originated with anti-Semitism, but that is fascinating. I have encountered some Marxists in my time and they focus exclusively (predictably) on the cis-white-male patriarchy, or whatever occupies their brainwashed minds after an Introduction to Gender Studies class.

    Johan , says: December 19, 2019 at 11:15 pm GMT
    @Anon repudiated at will, capitalism cannot function."

    Is this children's capitalist theory class time? throwing around some simple slogans for a susceptible congregation of future believers?

    Should be quite obvious that people, groups of people, if not whole nations , can be forced and or seduced into depths by means of certain practices. There are a thousand ways of such trickery and thievery, these are not in the theory books though. In these books things all match and work out wonderfully rationally

    Then capitalism cannot function? Unfortunately it has become already dysfunctional, if not a big rotten cancer.

    secondElijah , says: December 19, 2019 at 11:18 pm GMT
    @J Adleman Ezekiel 21:25 25 'Now to you, O profane, wicked prince of Israel, whose day has come, whose iniquity shall end
    Jeremiah 5:9 Shall I not punish them for these things?" says the LORD. "And shall I not avenge Myself on such a nation as this?

    As Jesus said which of the prophets have you not killed or persecuted? The truth hurts. As for me I do not hate Jews ..I feel terribly sad for a people that are capable of greatness and squandered the gifts given to them by God. Are you a holy nation? Don't make me laugh. Repent. Your time is coming. No more running and hiding. Deception will no longer save you only acceptance of the Messiah.

    tomo , says: December 19, 2019 at 11:28 pm GMT
    @Father O'Hara

    he can't be bargained with,he can't reasoned with,he doesn't feel pity,remorse,or fear " In other words – a 'culture' as a PSYCHOPATH it's a well-oiled psychopath support group

    Clutch these pearls, sqrt, sqrt, sqrt , says: December 19, 2019 at 11:36 pm GMT

    Hey! Don't mention anything a Jew ever did, especially usury, or else the entire cult will go up in a holocaustal mushroom cloud of emo nasal whining. In Judaism you've got a fanatical sect that systematically selects and brainwashes its members to inculcate extreme values of two Big Five personality axes: high neuroticism and low intellect (where intellect means open-mindedness.) Note the existential crisis triggered by a straightforward lecture from The Society for the Study of Unbelievably Obvious Shit.

    https://www.tabletmag.com/jewish-news-and-politics/295595/pride-and-prejudice-at-fieldston

    Of course Israel is holocausting the Palestinians. This is what happens when the founding myth of a nation is, We wiped em all out and then they wiped us almost all out so now we gotta wipe em all out etc., etc., etc.

    Fuck Israel. Fuck the Jewish State.

    tomo , says: December 19, 2019 at 11:41 pm GMT
    @J.W. en a narcissist and a psychopath is that the former need people to like them whereas psychopaths genuinely could not care less (although they learn early that acting as if they do can be very helpful , as can always trying to elicit sympathy etc).
    As I noticed while reading a few books on psychopathy (I was inspired to after reading Steve Job's biography) – their whole 'culture' is structured as a (collective ) PSYCHOPATH.
    It seems that (collectively) they cannot care about others even if they wanted to. Due to their sickness

    I am not saying they are all that way – but overall their 'culture' seems to be that way

    Skeptikal , says: December 19, 2019 at 11:56 pm GMT

    @Colin Wright

    The Sacklers occupy a hoity-toity rung in the philanthropy universe, as they have given enough $$$ to Harvard for H to paste their name on its museum housing I believe its whole Asian art collection.

    Students have now protested Harvard's high-profile gift of probity and cultural status to the Sacklers via, literally, an "Aushangerschild" on a major university museum. Harvard protests back: Jeez, if we don't take the Sacklers' dough we might be obliged to stop taking the dough from Exxon, etc.

    tomo , says: December 20, 2019 at 12:04 am GMT
    @Anon ou are right that loans should be repaid – it is immoral to allow a well connected mafia to change all the laws and remove protections while pushing up prices of everything because it suits the lender (who has a licence to print).
    They basically lend money that does not exist and get interest for that. So the more sheeple are tricked into borrowing the better for them, but the worse for everyone else
    They should not be allowed to bribe politicians to remove all the protection that was there since 1920s I think.
    It's a marriage from hell: easy to bribe Anglosheep meets the masters of predatory bribing who own the printing press
    lavoisier , says: Website December 20, 2019 at 12:22 am GMT
    @anon

    That stupid cuck Trump just got impeached by the House. Thats a good lesson to everybody how much good Jew-ass kissing does for you .you get stabbed in the back anyway lol

    Couldn't have happened to a more deserving and treacherous scumbag!

    But he should have been impeached for his treachery to the constitution and to the American people for his slavish devotion to all things Jewish!

    PCA , says: December 20, 2019 at 12:24 am GMT
    @mark green

    The singular is PHENOMENON for God's sake. Phenomena is plural.

    Have Americans always been this illiterate?

    BannedHipster , says: Website December 20, 2019 at 12:26 am GMT
    @Digital Samizdat

    True, but irrelevant. The Jews that matter don't read the Talmud or believe in "Adam and Eve."

    It's 2020. The Jewish religion is "The Holocaust" and we're all "Nazis."

    Frankly, it's these traditional religious notions of "anti-semitism" that get in the way of understanding what is, at the core, an ethnic issue. It's Sheldon Adelson, the Zionist entity in Palestine, and the ADL that are the problem, not some looney-tunes rabbi living in Brooklyn.

    Daniel Rich , says: December 20, 2019 at 12:31 am GMT
    @Digital Samizdat

    But I see all kinds of people even on this thread blaming the victim instead -- 'Damn goyishe deadbeats!' Whatever

    The number of families who're unable to pay an $500 emergency bill is staggering as is the number of families being 1 paycheck away from bankruptcy.

    Yes, some people are totally irresponsible and burn through their money faster than it can be printed, but not all 55,000,000 of 'em.

    Rafael Martorell , says: December 20, 2019 at 12:47 am GMT

    The other side of the explanation is the lacking of reaction of the victim, the american people. The least that the people that loot the world trough and with the USA power should do, is ,at least ,let us,the american people, a free ride.

    Milesglorious , says: December 20, 2019 at 12:50 am GMT
    @anarchyst

    And when it comes, vae victis.

    Frank Frivilous , says: December 20, 2019 at 12:51 am GMT

    Well, DynCorp has a particularly insidious reputation beyond your run of the mill Usury.

    https://www.outsidethebeltway.com/wikileaks-reveals-american-contractors-involvement-in-afghan-pedophile-ring/

    Not illegal in the Talmud either but most certainly illegal in all of the countries that DynCorp was caught profiting from this type of business. For some reason they never seem to suffer for their exposure suggesting that they may be wielding the same influence that Epstein had over our elected officials.

    Rafael Martorell , says: December 20, 2019 at 12:59 am GMT

    We dont have to get back to the Singer of this world but to our own politicians ,that allowed them to do this to us,and to the world.In this kind of abusive realtionship the 2 sides are to blame.

    Thomasina , says: December 20, 2019 at 1:14 am GMT
    @Just passing through h and then moved over to the West with their newfound gains, buying up properties, forcing prices up for the natives. The western corporations not only wanted cheap products to export back to the U.S., but they were also developing a whole new market – Chinese consumers who would buy their products as well. Double plus good!

    And once in the West, the Chinese and the Indians stick to their groups. They hire their own, promote their own, do business together. A lot of corruption, money laundering, cheating, taking advantage of and bending laws. Rule of law? Code of ethics? Morals? Do unto others? They never learned it. Opportunistic dual citizens.

    Isthatright , says: December 20, 2019 at 1:23 am GMT
    @Colin Wright

    Tucker is smart. He never uses the J word. Great article.

    Fayez chergui , says: December 20, 2019 at 1:31 am GMT

    The only path to understand the spirit of jews to money is to read the Old Testament : clear and sharp.

    lavoisier , says: Website December 20, 2019 at 1:42 am GMT
    @utu

    I would not count on the effect of the electric shock on the leftist thinkers. The role of Jewish Bolsheviks in the Cheka, NKVD, GULAGs, genocides by famine has been known from the very beginning and yet it left no impact on the leftist thinkers.

    It unfortunately has not had much of an effect on a lot of people in the West, who remain ignorant or in denial of the role played by Jewish Bolsheviks in historic mass murders and totalitarian repression.

    Waiting for the Hollywood movie to tell the story.

    Rebel0007 , says: December 20, 2019 at 1:42 am GMT

    [Too much totally off-topic crackpottery. Stop this or most of your future comments may get trashed.]

    Mefobills , says: December 20, 2019 at 2:02 am GMT
    @utu

    This is why you need to start with Zarlinga, as there is no BS to lead you astray. Hudson tends to drill the bulls-eye too. There is so much deception in the field of money and economy, that it is easy to get caught up in false narratives, like one-born free libertarianism. Usury flows fund the deception, even to the point of leaving out critical passages in translations, such as in Aristotle's works. Or, important works are bought up and burned.

    Michael Hudson is the leading economist resurrecting Classical Economics. Reading all of Hudson and Zarlinga will take some time and effort, but it is good to take a first step.

    9/11 Inside job , says: December 20, 2019 at 2:10 am GMT
    @Anon According to Wikipedia : " The armed rebellion of the Mau Mau was the culminating response to Colonial rule . Although there had been previous instances of violent resistance to colonialism , the Mau Mau revolt was the most prolonged and violent anti-colonial warfare in the British Colonial colony. From the start the land was the primary British interest in Kenya ."
    Just as the Kenyans suffered the consequences of British colonialism , the "Palestinians will suffer
    the consequences of Zionist colonialism until Israel's original sin is boldly confronted and justly remedied " foreignpolicyjournal.com
    Realist , says: December 20, 2019 at 2:17 am GMT
    @the grand wazoo

    No, not stupid whites, they're not to blame. It's the greedy corrupt politician: white, black, or white jew, who are to blame.

    Who votes these greedy corrupt politicians into office? Hint: It is Whites who are the majority.

    Citizen of a Silly Country , says: December 20, 2019 at 2:20 am GMT
    @anon

    distinction of Jewish investors versus gentile investors – on average, of course – is their use of bribery to get the force of government behind them. Rather than taking a bet about some group being able to pay back some bonds and letting the chips fall where they may, Jews start bribing or influencing politicians to force that group to pay back the bonds.

    Buy some bonds, charge outrageous fees, bribe officials in some form or other, get govt to force the payment of bonds and outrageous fees. Rinse and repeat. Jews have been doing this in some form aor another for 1500 years. It's why the peasants get a tad angry at both the Jews and their bribed politicians/nobility.

    Thomasina , says: December 20, 2019 at 2:22 am GMT
    @lavoisier

    money. Dear me, wait until that comes out.

    Trump is in league with the Jews? Yeah, who isn't? Obama's lips are still sore from kissing Jewish Wall Street bankers' asses (notice that none of them went to jail). Same with the Clinton's.

    You can get politicians to pass all sorts of laws in your favor if you've got enough dirt on them. After all, your side owns the media, Hollywood, academia, the courts, the banks.

    If dirt doesn't work, you can always threaten to impeach them in order to get what you want.

    But Trump is also revealing every last dirty one of them (accidentally or on purpose). People see them now.

    Robert Dolan , says: December 20, 2019 at 2:37 am GMT

    ...Trump sucks. All decent people should stand up and fight against these scumbags.

    They can't play whack a mole with all of us.

    Colin Wright , says: Website December 20, 2019 at 2:49 am GMT
    @Informed Reader

    'Colin Wright: Tel Aviv University's Medical School is called the "Sackler Faculty of Medicine." Does that help answer your question?'

    That sort of thing is what led me to ask the question.

    tomo , says: December 20, 2019 at 2:50 am GMT
    @Father O'Hara

    I now use therm 'Weinsteined' to mean 'raped' (by jewish banksters, investors etc)

    Also Jewish , says: December 20, 2019 at 2:52 am GMT
    @J Adelman

    J Adelman comes out swinging. He's such a tough guy. But does he make sense? Does he care if he makes sense? The writer is talking about those Jews who are vulture capitalists. He's not talking about every Jew. Isn't it a little odd that nearly all of these funds are run by Jews? Can your corrupt mind accept that fact and address the question? Or are you going to bore us with your religion and by that I mean your obsession with anti-semitism, which is your religion.

    tomo , says: December 20, 2019 at 3:00 am GMT
    @bike-anarkist

    I posted the same comment on the Facebook a few hours ago and it's still there

    Colin Wright , says: Website December 20, 2019 at 3:04 am GMT
    @Art

    'Hmm -- The day after Trump in inaugurated for his second term -- will Iran be in his crosshairs? We need to think very seriously about that!

    My guess is Iran is in the crosshairs. Trump probably promised he'd start the war as soon as he was elected the first time -- but he putzed around, and now it's almost 2020. Adelson et al are pissed -- but Trump's got a point. If he starts the war now the unknown Democrat will win -- and do you trust their word instead? They just gotta trust Trump. Let him get reelected -- then he'll come through.

    This is one of those cases where I'll be happy to be proved wrong -- but such is my suspicion.

    mark green , says: December 20, 2019 at 3:23 am GMT
    @PCA

    Stop splitting hairs. Is this the best you can do? Are you one of Lot's cronies? I don't normally address petty matters of this kind but Joyce is describing a multitude of sins and misconduct orchestrated by various Jewish financiers around the globe. It is not merely one phenomenon; thus, 'phenomena' fits. Go troll someone else.

    redmudhooch , says: December 20, 2019 at 4:13 am GMT

    Typical Jew baiting article. Mitt Romney isn't a "Jew" Ashish Masih isn't. Many more examples of gentiles taking advantage of their brothers. May as well consider the Walton family of Wal-Mart to be vultures as well since they benefit the most from this system, they're so called Christians, not Jews.

    The problem is capitalism. Author seems to suggest that a moral economic system has been corrupted. The system was designed in an era of widespread slavery folks. Its an immoral system that requires theft, slavery, war, immigration, all the things you hate, to survive. The system is working exactly as it is designed to work. Exploit workers, the environment and resources, shift all the profits from workers to the owners of capital, period. Welcome to the late stage, it eats and destroys itself

    From the days of the colonists slaughtering the Injuns and stealing their land. The days of importing African slaves, and indentured servants. The days of child labor and factory owners hiring Pinkertons to gun down workers who protested shitty wages and working conditions. The good ol days of the gilded age. Now the age of offshoring to China or some other lower wage nation. Overthrowing leaders not willing to let their resources and people be plundered and enslaved, driving refugees to our borders fleeing violence and poverty. Importing H1B workers to drive down wages. It was always a corrupt system of exploitation/theft/slavery. This is nothing new and doesn't require "Jews" to be immoral.

    And all these so called "Christians" like Pastor Pence approve. Usury and capitalism run amok. I'm sure Jesus is smiling down on all these Bible toting demons who allow their fellow man to be exploited by the parasites. Sad!

    Good for Tucker. He has his moments I'd watch his show if he wasn't a partisan hack. But that will never happen working for Fox or any other corporate media.

    Thomasina , says: December 20, 2019 at 5:31 am GMT
    @Anon

    You've read "Red Notice", but that is only Browder's side. To get the other side, read these articles from Consortium News:

    https://consortiumnews.com/tag/william-browder/

    Thomasina , says: December 20, 2019 at 6:18 am GMT
    @Colin Wright , maybe you're just assassinated.

    Trump loves his daughter and she is married to a Jew. If they're not getting their way, I could see them telling Trump: "Sad what happened at the Pittsburgh synagogue, isn't it? Sure hope nothing like that happens to your daughter."

    I don't envy Trump. He not only is up against the Democrats, but he is also fighting the globalist neocons in his own party. Both parties want open borders and more war, something Trump does not believe in. As far as I can see, he's throwing them bones in order to shut them up. If he gets elected again, which I think he will, we might see a different Trump. Who knows.

    ivan , says: December 20, 2019 at 9:38 am GMT

    Rather amusing to read our resident Jewish apologists carrying on about the absolute sanctity of the necessity of collecting debts to the functioning of the capitalistic system. These nations and corporate entities that are now in thrall of the Wall Street Jews , were herded into debt by that other faction of the capitalist system, the dealers in easy money. Snookering the rubes into lifelong debt, telling them that money is on the tap, promoting unsustainable spending habits and then let the guillotine come down, for the vultures to feed on. They are two sides of the same coin.

    Its damned funny that the rich Jews nowadays are absolutely addicted to usury, rentier activities, and debt collection, when the Bible itself condemns such activities. But they are our elder brothers in faith according to some.

    PaddyWhack , says: December 20, 2019 at 9:58 am GMT
    @Colin Wright

    Carnegie was a Protestant. The Protestant cancer serves it's Jewish masters. Read 'The Jewish Revolutionary Spirit' by E. Michael Jones. There is definitely a revolutionary nature to the international Jew just as there is to their Protestant dupes. Jewish nature is to subvert the natural order and the west was built by the guidance of LOGOS. The Catholic Faith created by God guided the creation of the west. These Jewish exploits are a result of the Wests rejection of its nature and its enslavement

    Calvin Simms , says: December 20, 2019 at 10:12 am GMT

    Amazing article from the ever insightful Andrew Joyce. The usual apologists are sputtering to try to mitigate the damage, but the game is almost up.

    anno nimus , says: December 20, 2019 at 10:38 am GMT

    1. rich or poor, creditor or debtor, in the final analysis, ultimately, all will become equal in the grave. the filthy rich might decide to lay their corpses in coffins made of gold, but it will be in vain. the sorrows and the joys of this fleeting world shall quickly pass like the shadow.
    2. talmudics feel the need to accumulate money in order to have sense of security since they were stateless for two millennia. paradoxically, amount of wealth is indirectly proportional to a sense of security, provoking backlash from aggrieved host people.
    3. establishment of State of Israel did not reduce the need for the accumulation but has only heightened it since now talmudics feel the need to support it so that she could maintain military superiority over neighbouring threats.
    4. as long as Palestinians are not free and Israel does not make peace, talmudics will continue to meddle in American politics. if you don't want to save the Palestinians for the sake of humanity and truth or justice, at least you should do it for your own sake.
    5. loan sharking, vulture whatever, etc., is the ugliness of big capitalism with capital C, what is beyond sickening is the promotion of sodomy. if one becomes poor or homeless, it's a pity. to go against nature is an abomination.
    6. by using such words as "homosexual" you have accepted the paradigm of the social engineers and corruptors, and are therefore collaborating with them. words have consequences since that is how we convey ideas unless you own Hollywood and can produce your own moving pictures too.
    7. talmudics is a better word than as a great American scholar says, since people who promote sodomy are absolutely opposed to the Torah (O.T.). those who still struggle to follow it couldn't care less what happens to benighted goyim, only becoming reinforced in pride of their own purity as opposed to disgraced nations. thus, practically, they too are talmudics, alien to the spirit of the ancient holy fathers and prophets of Israel. the word "Orthodox" has been stolen and now has lost all meaning or it means the exact opposite of what it originally meant.
    8. Blessed are the meek, for they shall inherit the earth. Matthew 5:5

    Wizard of Oz , says: December 20, 2019 at 10:38 am GMT
    @Colin Wright

    Well there's nothing wrong in principle about specialists in valuing distressed debt and managing it nuying such debt and using the previously established mechanisms for getting value out of their investment. So the problem is how they go about enforcing their rights and the lack of regulation to mitigate hardship in hard cases.

    Still it is notable that it should, overwhelmingly be a Jewish business and such a powerful medium for enriching Jewish causes and communities at the expense of poor Americans.

    9/11 Inside job , says: December 20, 2019 at 11:30 am GMT
    @Colin Wright

    George Bush needed Tony Blair's support to attack Iraq , Donald Trump now has the support of Boris Johnson to attack Iran : "Boris Johnson refuses to rule out military intervention on Iran ." metro.co.uk

    It is said that the "deep state " removed Theresa May from office as she was "too soft" on Iran . As you suggest the attack will not happen until Trump's second term unless, in the meantime , there is a false flag attack like 9/11 which can be blamed on the Iranians .

    Realist , says: December 20, 2019 at 12:07 pm GMT
    @eah

    While Whites theoretically still have the numbers to affect/determine the outcome of elections, a majority of Whites usually stay home because they are tired of the 'evil of two lessers' choice they are offered -- even voting for Trump got them little/nothing.

    I said nothing of an electoral solution to America's problems the problems will not be solved that way.

    Digital Samizdat , says: December 20, 2019 at 12:09 pm GMT
    @Art

    That scary thought has crossed my mind, too, Art. I've even started wondering if this whole impeachment circus is really part of an elaborate plot to guarantee Trump's re-election. I mean, would Pelosi's insane actions make the slightest sense otherwise? And everyone has noted how this is such a 'Jew coup,' haven't they? It all looks so suspicious

    Digital Samizdat , says: December 20, 2019 at 12:18 pm GMT
    @Mefobills

    What our Jewish friends have done to Argentina, through maneuvering the elections, killing dissidents, and marking territory, is a cautionary tale to anybody woke enough to see with their own eyes.

    Yup. And don't forget that ongoing Zionist psy-op known as the AMIA bombing: https://thesaker.is/hezbollah-didnt-do-argentine-bombing-updated/

    Thomasina , says: December 20, 2019 at 4:14 pm GMT
    @geokat62

    "'I'm HARDCORE Zionist and so is president Trump!' – Roger Stone"

    If Trump was hardcore Zionist, they wouldn't have been going after him since the day he announced he would run for President.

    No, they see him as an absolute threat to their existence.

    As they twist to fight him, they are all exposing themselves.

    Ilya G Poimandres , says: December 20, 2019 at 4:14 pm GMT
    @Mefobills mo.. maybe other than when 100% of the Ummah agree on something, I read that could remove a surah of the Quran, like a voice of God. That rhymes nicely imo.

    Of course how to judge which ruling to use? I agree, it brings in a casuistry into the faith that generally helps to confuse.. I don't know much about it though yet.

    I think Islam preaches a decent message, but the average practitioner is open to misinterpret it quite a bit. This is a failing of the teaching.. but I think Mohammed's message was corrupted like Christ's message pretty much straight after his death. Gospel of Thomas and Tolstoy's rewrites all the way for something closer imo.

    Desert Fox , says: December 20, 2019 at 4:48 pm GMT
    @Thomasina

    Trump is a hardcore zionist and the impeachment is another zionist scam to divide the American people, read The Protocols of Zion.

    Mefobills , says: December 20, 2019 at 4:51 pm GMT
    @sally n in iniquity, and that is where your eye should gaze, not necessarily at the FED or any central bank.

    The debt money system and finance capitalism is state sponsored usury, and is a Jewish construct.

    Vulture capitalism is simply vultures buying up or creating distressed assets and then changing the law, or using force to then collect face value of the debt instrument or other so called asset. Vultures will use hook or crook to force down what they are buying, and hook or crook to force up what they are selling. God's special people can do this because when they look in the mirror, they are god, and are sanctioned to do so.

    Trinity , says: December 20, 2019 at 5:05 pm GMT

    Maybe the vulture should replace the bald eagle as America's favorite bird since our dear shabbos goy President Trump and cohorts are undermining the First Amendment and trying to make it a crime to criticize Jews and/or Israel. Oh and don't think I am promoting the other Zionist and their shabbos goy on the demshevik side. The Jew CONTROLS both sides and "our" two party system has become Jew vs. Jew, not republican vs. democrat. Lenin said that the best way to control the opposition was to lead it and (((they))) are at it AGAIN.

    Mefobills , says: December 20, 2019 at 5:09 pm GMT
    @Ilya G Poimandres zies, who twist scripture. Judaism, especially Talmudic Judaism is Kabala and utterances of the sages, and it morphs and changes over time. For example, after Sabatai Sevi, the Kol-Neidre was weaponized, and this construct is used by today's Zionists to wreak havoc. Before Sabatai, there was Hillel, who weaponized usury.

    Yes, I agree about Christianity changing quite a bit. In the first 300 years it was much different than today, especially after the Arien controversy was settled by Constantine's maneuvering of Bishops at council of Nicea. For example, before; reincarnation was part of Christian doctrine, and after; reincarnation was excluded.

    Digital Samizdat , says: December 20, 2019 at 5:31 pm GMT
    @utu Great clip! I always loved Fry & Laurie.

    I have long maintained that libertarianism/capitalism is really like a kind of Calvinism for atheists. Calvinists used to assume that, since whatever happened was God's will and God's will was invariable good, then whatever happened was good. Likewise, many modern cucks seem to have just substituted The Market for God. Morally speaking, it all lets man off the hook for anything that results–especially when those men happen to be Jewish financiers!

    No, boys and girls, The Market is not inherently good. It requires that a moral system be superimposed on top of it in order to make it moral.

    likbez , says: December 20, 2019 at 5:50 pm GMT
    @Anon k of this MI6 asset (and potential killer) who tried to fleece Russia, you probably can benefit from watching a movie by Nekrasov about him. See references in:

    http://www.softpanorama.org/Skeptics/Political_skeptic/Fighting_russophobia/Propaganda_as_creation_of_artificial_reality/Browder/index.shtml

    It looks like it was Browder who killed Magnitsky, so that he can't spill the beans. And then in an act of ultimate chutzpah played the victim and promoted Magnitsky act.

    Anonymouse , says: December 20, 2019 at 5:59 pm GMT
    @Colin Wright

    There is no defending these jewish malefactors. It has been pointed out that immorality is a disposition to be found in every ethnicity. The problem is that the jews with that disposition are more clever than folks from other ethnicities with the same dispostion. Being more clever, they are outstandinly better at depradation. I don't see how and why the recognition of the existence of evil jews justifies the author's hatred of jews as a whole.

    Brundlefly , says: December 20, 2019 at 6:04 pm GMT
    @Colin Wright

    Colin, I'm going to assume this is a rhetorical question, as there is not one example that would cause you to suspect there is really any doubt about the types of organizations that the Sacklers are donating their ill-gotten wealth to.

    annamaria , says: December 20, 2019 at 6:27 pm GMT
    @Digital Samizdat ocities, including the murder of civilians, predominantly Jews and Poles under the Nazi German administration. The term Banderites was also used by the Bandera followers themselves, and by others during the Holocaust, and the massacres of Poles and Jews in Volhynia and Eastern Galicia by OUN-UPA in 1943–1944.

    The zionists have been asking hard for a backlash: https://katehon.com/article/riding-tiger-zionism-israel-and-far-right

    [MORE]

    Mefobills , says: December 20, 2019 at 7:00 pm GMT

    @Digital Samizdat and infest England, is not well understood by the average Goy.

    Our modern world is a direct line back to this big-bang event. Christian Zionism goes back much further in time than to just Cyrus Scofield and Darby. Our Jewish friends in Amsterdam were even publishing bibles at great expense, to then push the narrative that the "people of god and old testament" deserve to return to England.

    (The usurers had been previously kicked out of England by King Edward in 1290. The usurers had been plying their game, and "putting house to house" to where English citizens were being dispossessed from their own lands.)

    Sound familiar?

    Mefobills , says: December 20, 2019 at 7:12 pm GMT
    @Anonymouse y Jewish as were the Bolsheviks of a hundred years ago, and they have greatly benefited from the political immunity provided by this totally bizarre inversion of historical reality. Partly as a consequence of their media-fabricated victimhood status, they have managed to seize control over much of our political system, especially our foreign policy, and have spent the last few years doing their utmost to foment an absolutely insane war with nuclear-armed Russia. If they do manage to achieve that unfortunate goal, they will surely outdo the very impressive human body-count racked up by their ethnic ancestors, perhaps even by an order-of-magnitude or more.
    ANZ , says: December 20, 2019 at 9:34 pm GMT
    @Mefobills ted into being seen as the greatest victims, a transformation so seemingly implausible that future generations will surely be left gasping in awe.

    Aided by no small part by chutzpah. The uncanny ability to ability to call black white and to call good evil. With no cultural love of truth to anchor them in reality. Thus detached, they are free to invent an alternate reality. I wonder if they do not suffer from cognitive dissonance. They seem genetically protected from it.

    They are actually self-deluded and want to infect the rest of us with their visions of victimhood.

    Long live the internet

    alex in San Jose AKA digital Detroit , says: December 20, 2019 at 10:04 pm GMT

    @Mefobills

    Not saying fellow Whites haven't helped me out, but Jews have, out of proportion to their numbers in the population by far.

    I'm not sure how tons of Nobel prizes, advances in medicine, etc are "destroying everything they touch".

    There was nothing done to my family to make them cold, short-sighted, selfish bastards. That's just White culture for ya.

    eah , says: December 20, 2019 at 10:21 pm GMT
    @Realist ; votes these greedy corrupt politicians into office? Hint: It is Whites who are the majority.

    My first comment to you was #256 -- again "for the record": I did not give enough of a damn about you or your idiotic statement ("Stupid Whites are responsible for allowing this to happen") to comment/reply to you before you mentioned voting .

    "LOL"

    And I don't appreciate it when people attribute specific words, views, or thoughts to me that I did not express -- make a note of it, asshole.

    You fucking prick.

    Mefobills , says: December 20, 2019 at 10:24 pm GMT
    @Thomasina ich changed the meaning of the Statue.

    Descendants of this immigration wave are the liberal jews pushing the jew coup against Trump. This is why they are from Ukraine (former pale of settlement area) or Russian haters.

    To my mind, Trump is a Christian Zionist and has naturally allied with Bibi and the Zionist religious factions, such as Chabbad/Likkud.

    Since U.S. has been fully infiltrated, then having Mossad and its agents on your side, is a strategy to keep from being suicided by the deep state, like JFK.

    I'm willing to give Trump some lee-way, given the circumstances of our current reality.

    Mefobills , says: December 20, 2019 at 10:40 pm GMT
    @alex in San Jose AKA digital Detroit n pale of the settlement, or in Polish Shtetls, they created nothing of import.

    Only when operating within the confines of Western Christian culture, or forced into western education by the Tsars, did Jews break free to be productive. And even then that production came at high cost to the host societies.

    In other words, a good argument can be made, that if Jews had never infiltrated into Western Civilization, then said Westerners would have been much better off.

    Sorry if real history is butt-hurting.

    Today's Iran is another model on how to deal with the Jew problem. Jews are limited there in the same way as was done in Byzantium.

    Druid , says: December 20, 2019 at 10:52 pm GMT
    @sally

    Your Jewish friends are, as they're wont to be, Zionist talmudists liars!!

    Digital Samizdat , says: December 20, 2019 at 11:03 pm GMT
    @Colin Wright ow" href="https://www.counterpunch.org/2019/12/18/impeachment-what-lies-beneath/">over at CounterPunch

    So here's my entirely speculative tea-leaf reading: If there's a hidden agenda behind the urgency to remove Trump, one that might actually garner the votes of Republican Senators, it is to replace him with a president who will be a more reliable and effective leader for a military attack on Iran that Israel wants to initiate before next November. Spring is the cruelest season for launching wars.

    His story is that the Israelis consider Pence to be more reliable. Who knows

    Art , says: December 20, 2019 at 11:03 pm GMT
    @Digital Samizdat Pelosi is a figurehead controlled by AIPAC.

    The most important committee chairmanships to Israeli interests, are all held by Jews.

    Nita Lowey – Appropriations Committee
    Adam Schiff – Intelligence Committee
    Jerrold Nadler – Judiciary Committee
    Eliot Engel – Foreign Affairs Committee

    This ploy of holding back the impeachment documents sounds like something crazy Schiff would do.

    I think that there is something mentally and culturally wrong with that guy – he has zero regard for truthfulness.

    Pelosi has trashed her legacy. That's what happens when you get close to the Jews.

    annamaria , says: December 21, 2019 at 1:28 am GMT
    @ANZ 11/13/the-psychopathology-of-being-jewish-and-getting-away-with-it/"> https://vidrebel.wordpress.com/2012/11/13/the-psychopathology-of-being-jewish-and-getting-away-with-it/

    No wonder that the majority of Jews do not want to live in the Jewish State. too many Jews there.
    They are quetching about antisemitism while attacking the western civilization -- from the assault on the First Amendment to the cheerleading for more wars for Israel in the Middle East.

    No one keeps the Jews from joining their brethren in Israel. There is no need to sing "Next year in Jerusalem." Enough already. Just go there -- and stay there.

    annamaria , says: December 21, 2019 at 1:49 am GMT
    @alex in San Jose AKA digital Detroit o humanity, the Jewish style.
    Buddy , says: December 21, 2019 at 2:34 am GMT
    @Mefobills ons that distract us from seeing the top of the pyramid. However, it would appear that Marx finally gets to finance in Volume Three of Capital. I could read the whole thing myself, but I would rather simply ask you what you think. How do you reconcile Marx the Illuminati Jewish agent with Marx the perspicacious critic of capitalism? Where were his real loyalties? Did he stick the dynamite at the end of his magnum opus instead of at the beginning in order to hide it from his finance masters, whom he knew would never actually read that far? Was he attempting to assuage a guilty conscience by sneaking the truth into a footnote?
    ANZ , says: December 21, 2019 at 3:31 am GMT
    @annamaria are quetching about antisemitism while attacking the western civilization -- from the assault on the First Amendment to the cheerleading for more wars for Israel in the Middle East.

    The complete lack of shame it takes to act like this is amazing to me. Also the hubris it would take. Though if you see yourself as a chosenite, those behaviors fit.

    Apparently if you hang around then long enough, the behavior is contagious. Biden's shady Ukrainian dealings, which are 100% real are being denied and instead projected onto Trump. It's infecting our politics. The shabbos goy are emulating their masters.

    Colin Wright , says: Website December 21, 2019 at 3:49 am GMT

    @sally

    'before I do, you must define venture capital.'

    Vulture capital, actually. How many gentiles you can name in that category?

    Achilles Wannabe , says: December 21, 2019 at 4:48 am GMT
    @redmudhooch ts since the cave but that is not capitalism. Capitalism is Usury – profit for the sake of profit independent of usefulness, welfare, community, lifestyle.
    .
    And as was argued by the great German economist/sociologist Werner Sombart, Capitalism was really invented by Jews However as E Michael Jones has argued, Protestantism – particularly Anglo Calvinism- was a backsliding of Christianity into Jewish materialism – the spiritual basis for capitalism. So everything seemingly goes around and around. Capitalism cannot be blamed solely on the Jews but Jews can never be abstracted from the evils of capitalism. We have to keep both balls in the air
    Daniel Rich , says: December 21, 2019 at 4:51 am GMT
    @Buddy

    Grab a small piece of paper. Add some fancy, symbolic stuff to it, like a fire-breathing dragon, with big, burning eyes, named ' Nimajneb , the faerie overlord, that hovers over an upside-down pyramid. Oh, and you'll need a number, let's say, '100.' Done. Print it out. Walk to the nearest person, say, "I've got here a $100 bill," and see what happens

    Yet, the FED can take the same little piece of paper, sprinkle some magic dust on it, et voilΰ, you've got your $100 greenback [aka IOU $100 banknote].

    Money makes the world go round?

    Spin out of control into a state of utter madness, I'd say.

    Achilles Wannabe , says: December 21, 2019 at 4:53 am GMT
    @redmudhooch

    Interesting argument. Please see my comment -# 313

    Mefobills , says: December 21, 2019 at 5:26 am GMT
    @Buddy can read through economic history or texts and spot the lies and fakery. So where does that leave the average layman to turn and not be hoaxed?

    Sorry it is so hard out there to navigate. I commend you for trying. I'm feeling pressure to write a book, because even Hudson does not initiate people from level zero up to someone advanced enough to resist the hoaxers.

    Richard Werner is pretty good, but you have to navigate around his favoritism of private banking. Money is law.. and he doesn't want to acknowledge that. This is what you run into, and the only way is for you to navigate as best you can and see if things ring true.

    Miggle , says: December 21, 2019 at 11:16 am GMT
    @Art

    This ploy of holding back the impeachment documents sounds like something crazy Schiff would do.

    I think that there is something mentally and culturally wrong with that guy – he has zero regard for truthfulness.

    Wrong? Zero regard for truthfulness is mentally and culturally right for Schiffty. Very Jewish. The right way, if one is Jewish.

    Nonny Mouse , says: December 21, 2019 at 11:27 am GMT
    @anno nimus

    I think Talmud means Pentateuch, not O.T.

    Nonny Mouse , says: December 21, 2019 at 11:35 am GMT
    @Nonny Mouse

    Sorry, I meat Torah, not Talmud. You called the Torah the O.T. It's only the first few books of the O.T., I think.

    Anon [388] Disclaimer , says: December 21, 2019 at 11:46 am GMT
    @Achilles Wannabe moral framework informing their behaviour.

    Real science has been suppressed and removed from the public sphere. Or it's been perverted for mass surveillance and social command and control and dual systems.

    I fully believe that execrable demons like Soros never die because they're getting baby blood from orphans passed through some heinous engine into their vile bodies.

    Meanwhile, we're forced to deal with nonsense like anthropogenic climate change, string theory, dark matter and other Jewry the sole purpose of which is to centralise power over mind and body in the hand of Jews and Masons.

    The Capitalist Jew is the Science Jew.

    The answer to both is the same.

    Robjil , says: December 21, 2019 at 12:02 pm GMT

    Poland created Askenazis by inviting them in 1025. They grew from 25,000 to the millions we have today all over the world.

    Yet, now the Ashkenazi tribe wants to stick it to Poland for creating them.

    https://russia-insider.com/en/polands-ruling-elite-want-hand-over-30-residential-property-holocaust-survivors/ri27962

    The Zionist racial bigotry behind S447 was foreshadowed by Israel Singer of the World Jewish Congress in 1996:

    "More than 3 million Jews died in Poland and Poles will not be the heirs of Polish Jews. We will never allow it. We will harass them until Poland is ice covered again. If Poland fails to satisfy Jewish demands, it will be publicly humiliated and attacked internationally . – secretary general of the World Jewish Congress"

    Notice the guy's last name – Singer. This is another form of Jewish mafia vulture capitalism, using any means to hurt the masses.

    What is S447?

    Section 3 of Act 447, the provision for heirless property, is the part that reveals the law's intent. Under existing laws, heirless property becomes the property of the state. After WW2 there was a lot of property without owners (whether owned by Poles or Jews), and it has been sold ever since. This law has the potential to cause national havoc, as the vast majority of Poles own their own homes. Even in the relatively cosmopolitan capital of Warsaw, 79% of city-dwellers own their homes and apartments.

    Under S447, any Polish-Jew or descendent of said Polish Jew can lay claim to property to property deemed heirless and sold after the war, thus all land that can be claimed to have been owned by Jews before 1939 will be transferred to the global Jewish diaspora. If this law is put into practice, approximately 30% of Warsaw homeowners will be forced to pay "rent" to random Jews claiming to be Holocaust survivors or their descendants in New York City and Tel Aviv.

    How would this "law" work in Poland?

    Under S447, any Polish-Jew or descendent of said Polish Jew can lay claim to property to property deemed heirless and sold after the war, thus all land that can be claimed to have been owned by Jews before 1939 will be transferred to the global Jewish diaspora. If this law is put into practice, approximately 30% of Warsaw homeowners will be forced to pay "rent" to random Jews claiming to be Holocaust survivors or their descendants in New York City and Tel Aviv.

    Trump was "impeached" for not giving arms freely to ZUS controlled Ukraine. The arms have been used to shell and kill civilians in East Ukraine. Yet, Trump should be impeached for pushing this Jewish Mafia vulture like capitalism on Poland.

    Pressure from the US government is only reason this law is even being considered. While Donald Trump appeals to the West and Polish patriotism in his speeches, his government's actions say something radically different. Last February, US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo demanded the Polish state pass this law. Last August, the American congress urged more pressure on the Polish state to get S447 through.

    George , says: December 21, 2019 at 12:39 pm GMT

    "Tucker Carlson's recent attack on the activities of Paul Singer's vulture fund"

    Yup, the bricks and mortar outdoor gear shops, Cabela's + Bass Pro need 2 HQs. Nebraska could have stopped it but instead chose farm subsidies, forever war, and pensions for government workers. To have that much spending excess in the government spending you need high efficiency from the civilian sector.

    The reaction in Nebraska seems to be a big yawn. My guess is Cabela was constantly trying to reduce their state and local taxes, at some point keeping the low wage retail jobs while dumping the high wage HQ jobs made sense, short term, so they sold Sidney NB down the river.

    Candidate targets Sasse on Sidney response, other issues

    "Nobody tried anything," was the compaint(sic) Innis heard on his visits to the struggling community.

    https://www.mccookgazette.com/story/2656650.html

    REI is probably safe as it is a Consumers' co-operative.

    mcohen , says: December 21, 2019 at 12:40 pm GMT

    Mefo says

    "Forces jews into honorable laboring professions"

    That is funny.I feel a laugh coming on.

    Well mefo let me tell you a funny story.This guy i know made some nasty comments about jews and not long after he got cancer.His doctor,a jewish cancer specialist put him back on his feet.
    Know what the funny part is.He still makes the same comments.

    From an article in the jew york times

    https://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/15/health/exhibition-traces-the-emergence-of-jews-as-medical-innovators.html

    Few escaped the pervasive prejudice, however. In the early 1900s, Dr. Paul Ehrlich, a German Jew who discovered a treatment for syphilis and is considered the father of chemotherapy, popularized the term "magic bullet" to describe a medical compound that would "aim exclusively at the dangerous intruding parasites" yet not "touch the organism itself."

    But though Dr. Ehrlich was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1908, he was not made a full professor at a university until 1914, a year before he died. (That posting was at the University of Frankfurt, in the year of its founding.) In the 1930s, as the Nazis came to power, his name was removed from textbooks and taken off Frankfurt's street signs. Paul-Ehrlich-Strasse regained its name only after World War II.

    annamaria , says: December 21, 2019 at 1:31 pm GMT
    @ANZ of bankers and religious fanatics or a land-based theocratic toy-state of Israel.

    It is the spirit of parasitism that is "infectious" and works against patriotism. Hense the local profiteers, from Rumsfeld to McCain, Biden, Brennan, Pelosi, Rubio and the likes who have been hastening the demise of the US for the immediate monetary compensation tied to the allegiance to the Jewish cause. The zionized NYT and the presstituting stink tanks the Atlantic Council (affiliated with the openly subversive Integrity Initiative), American Enterprise Institute and such have been working openly against the US interests and for ziocon interests.

    annamaria , says: December 21, 2019 at 1:43 pm GMT
    @Mefobills

    "Herzyl admired the Germans of the day, and wanted Jews to be like the German's he so admired. Herzyl thought that if Jews had their own country of Zion, they would settle down and become normal people."

    -- The dream was an illusion. When the meme "is it good for the Jew?" beats all and any moral principles, then the world gets a nation of thieves and murderers quetching non-stop about their eternal victimhood. Pathetic.

    http://www.thehypertexts.com/Israeli%20Prime%20Ministers%20Terrorists%20Nakba.htm

    annamaria , says: December 21, 2019 at 1:49 pm GMT

    http://www.thehypertexts.com/Israeli%20Prime%20Ministers%20Terrorists%20Nakba.htm

    [MORE]
    annamaria , says: December 21, 2019 at 5:25 pm GMT
    @mcohen spot.com/2012/10/czech-activists-accused-madeleine.html#more

    From the position of the USA Secretary of State, Madeleine Albright pushed for the bombing of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia in 1999, when NATO planes bombed without a UN mandate. She also supported the jihad in Bosnia during 1992-1995, and the manipulation of the facts about Srebrenica, but also personally earned from the privatization of Kosovo Telecommunications. She should, therefore, bear the consequences of her political decisions and acknowledge responsibility for the bloodshed, in which thousands of civilians were killed.

    FvS , says: December 21, 2019 at 6:44 pm GMT
    @lavoisier

    But in fairness, the Koch brothers are no damn good for the nation either.

    No, they are (were) not. However, they also got a lot of negative media attention while these Jewish vulture capitalists have mostly been given a pass. Also, whites are about 55% of the population while Jews are about 2%.

    Mr. Anon , says: December 21, 2019 at 7:32 pm GMT
    @silviosilver er because the debt was already in default or was at imminent risk of defaulting, which is why the debt sells at a heavy discount, since existing debt holders are often happy to sell cheap and get something rather than hold on and risk getting nothing.

    If A enters into a contract with B to borrow money, and then fails to be pay it back to B, why should C be able to come in and buy the debt from B and expect to be paid back? A entered into a contract with B, not C. And why should C expect to be able to employ the machinery of state coercion to force A to honor a contract that A didn't even make with C in the first place? Mr. Anon , says: December 21, 2019 at 7:37 pm GMT

    @Colin Wright

    It's important not to get carried away with this.

    I agree. Mitt Romney was also a financial hustler. The over-representation is real, but not exclusive.

    Mefobills , says: December 21, 2019 at 7:52 pm GMT
    @Thales the Milesian ters sent representatives to a small central government. This form of government was usurped in 1913, by the "money powers," and these money powers use elections as a veneer to sanction their behind the scenes rule.

    Here is another quote from the Ivan the Terrible article, which sums things up:

    n 1601, just a few years after Ivan's death, Russia was starving, leaderless and under attack. Again, under elite rule, with no ruling monarch, Russia was plunged into years of war and violence. Fighting oligarchy has been the traditional job of any monarch and is the ultimate purpose of government.

    Mefobills , says: December 21, 2019 at 8:10 pm GMT
    @Robjil olves to the "were so smart" and look at the medical advances, nobel prizes, etc. we've contributed.

    Conveniently left out of account, is that these advances would have been done anyway in their absence. The goyim do possess the intelligence and fortitude to solider on without jews in our midst, and in-fact, when jews are absent from our civilizations, advancement accelerates.

    The best thing for a jew to do is turn his back on the tribe, and re-join humanity.

    To any Jew reading this . walk away from the tribe. Man-up and get some intestinal fortitude, leave the parasite method behind you, and join humanity.

    niceland , says: December 21, 2019 at 8:11 pm GMT
    @Mefobills

    I'm feeling pressure to write a book, because even Hudson does not initiate people from level zero up to someone advanced enough to resist the hoaxers.

    Have you considered writing articles? Series of articles could later on become raw material for a book. Perhaps easier path to take and could perhaps provide useful feedback along the way.

    It sure looks like you could write far more informative and interesting articles than many writers here on Unz because of your broad perspective. The big picture is always more interesting and I agree with you about the importance of the subject.

    Mefobills , says: December 21, 2019 at 8:27 pm GMT
    @Mr. Anon d by these degenerate types of people in order to take illicit gains.

    In the U.S., (I'm an American), these usury flows funnel into the press – to where the press becomes owned, so that these Oligarchic interests can continue to take rents and unearned income through their various schemes.

    I might add, our intelligent UNZ readers, have noticed that the U.S. mainstream press is predominantly Jewish owned. Intelligent people notice patterns are some of us are unwilling to look away. No amount of deception through the mainstream press can reduce the revulsion moral people instinctively feel when watching vultures operate.

    ThreeCranes , says: December 21, 2019 at 9:37 pm GMT
    @Bookish1 ing whiteness has never been more urgent.' By Mark Levine"

    When challenged for apparently encouraging genocide, Levine and his cronies answer that "whiteness", as they are employing the term, is merely an accidental property as opposed to an essential quality. So stripping an organism of its whiteness will not diminish it to any significant degree, does not threaten its very existence, merely prunes it into a more acceptable shape.

    And yet when some poor misguided soul has the temerity to put up a sign saying "It's Okay To Be White", the Mark Levines of the world have a cow. Suddenly, "white" is not a mere accidental quality at all.

    mark green , says: December 21, 2019 at 9:53 pm GMT
    @FvS

    The Koch Brothers (what's left of them; one died recently) are industrialists. They build things people want. They are innovators. Yes, the Koch Brothers are filthy rich but they employ tens of thousands of people in the US alone.

    Most importantly, the Koch Bros. are not parasitic, money-skimming extractors or wealth like the vulture capitalists described by Joyce.

    Buddy , says: December 21, 2019 at 11:50 pm GMT
    @Mefobills s and schemes. The advantage of their technique is that it does not leave a positive trace but a negative trace. It is much more difficult to notice absence than presence. You can't see all the money that is constantly being vacuumed out of the economy. It doesn't leave a visible hole. And since none of us has ever witnessed firsthand what a rent-free economy might actually look like (since they are not allowed to exist), we internalize the belief that such an economy goes against natural law, when in fact the contrary is true.

    Is there any way for you to link to more of your writing without giving away your identity?

    mcohen , says: December 21, 2019 at 11:52 pm GMT
    @mcohen class="comment-text">

    Mefo

    Lol

    Ah so you're a team.interesting.protecting the ween.

    How about this paul ehrlich.next generation

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_R._Ehrlich

    Paul Ralph Ehrlich (born May 29, 1932) is an American biologist, best known for his warnings about the consequences of population growth and limited resources.[2][3] He is the Bing Professor of Population Studies of the Department of Biology of Stanford University and president of Stanford's Center for Conservation Biology.

    Mefobills , says: December 21, 2019 at 11:52 pm GMT
    @Thales the Milesian

    Straw man argument. I am not for democracy or human rights. Apparently you don't want to let go of your false worldview.

    mcohen , says: December 22, 2019 at 12:01 am GMT
    @mark green dding.Stop posting on unz,its for adults only.

    http://www.newyorker.com
    A Whistle-Blower Accuses the Kochs of "Poisoning" an Arkansas Town

    http://www.rollingstone.com
    Web results
    David Koch Built a Toxic Empire -- with Human Consequences

    https://m.huffpost.com › entry
    Koch Brothers' Toxic Legacy Detailed In New Report | HuffPost

    Reid right on claiming Kochs produce more pollution than oil giants

    Wally , says: December 22, 2019 at 12:11 am GMT
    @Achilles Wannabe

    Don't like a product or service that a "capitalist" makes or offers?

    Fine & dandy, don't buy it, don't pay for it.

    It's called choice .

    There is no choice under your preferred Communism, as we have seen repeatedly.

    Daniel Rich , says: December 22, 2019 at 12:19 am GMT
    @Robjil

    Under S447, any Polish-Jew or descendent of said Polish Jew can lay claim to property to property deemed heirless and sold after the war, thus all land that can be claimed to have been owned by Jews before 1939 will be transferred to the global Jewish diaspora.

    Let's make a variant of the Polish S447 applicable to Palestinians and find out how much the illegal occupiers of Palestine like to see 'justice.'

    Dingo jay b , says: Website December 22, 2019 at 12:20 am GMT

    To be brief :Wasn't. Singer originally behind the dossier on Trump?

    Mefobills , says: December 22, 2019 at 12:42 am GMT
    @mcohen eir factories full of low IQ but compliant workers. 3) The finance banking class who want new debts to pay off old debts. New Debtors help fund a new debt cycle. 4) New people through population replacement, destroy the history and cohesion of the host country. By de-racinating and destroying the host people, then Plutocrats can continue with their thefts unchallenged.

    The debt money cycle is something like a pyramid, where it sucks upward toward plutocracy. Plutocrats and Oligarchs then emit hypnosis and propaganda through the owned press to maintain their status. The funnel, or bottom of the pyramid wants new debts and new debtors.

    anon [415] Disclaimer , says: December 22, 2019 at 12:46 am GMT
    @Father O'Hara

    how do entities like Puerto Rico get so far in debt in the first place? so many problems because of what appeared to be incompetent and comatose government.

    Yes, ultimately the blame must lie with the voters: they picked douche, when they should have picked turd.

    Robjil , says: December 22, 2019 at 12:55 am GMT
    @Daniel Rich l, Germany and Russia were both strangled. The US's turn is now. The US wants to strangle Poland too with this s447 law. Trump should have been impeached for pushing this law on Poland.

    Pressure from the US government is only reason this law is even being considered. While Donald Trump appeals to the West and Polish patriotism in his speeches, his government's actions say something radically different. Last February, US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo demanded the Polish state pass this law. Last August, the American congress urged more pressure on the Polish state to get S447 through.

    anon [415] Disclaimer , says: December 22, 2019 at 12:58 am GMT
    @Svevlad uple of centuries, nearly took Europe too, and were a serious thorn in everyone's side for a thousand years

    In other words, they did much better than the Jews over the same period

    Ball-breaking is a viable strategy, apparently

    I think that all afroasiatic-speaking populations are like this, if they were to gain in intelligence the world would get weird real fast

    Nah, no danger: it's just first-mover advantage, which, by definition, can belong only to one entity

    Things went a little differently two thousand years ago, people like Joyce could just as easily have been writing about Kurds or Alawites or whatever

    Mefobills , says: December 22, 2019 at 1:03 am GMT

    Buddy,

    The real eureka moment for me came when I finally understood that money and debt were created at the same time on opposite sides of the ledger. Only the two columns are not equal. One column grows through magic while the other does not. Once the sorcery has been wrought, the creditors can simply sit back and wait as the mechanism eventually transfers all the wealth in the world to them.

    That is pretty good. Economics and most equations do not codify time. The equal sign cannot comprehend time, so most of the math used in economics textbooks is telling lies.

    Also, as I mentioned earlier, the bad guys put their thumb on the scale and call things equal. They do this with swaps of unlike kinds. For example, you can build up housing prices with bubble economics, then collapse the economy by preventing new loans, or doing call-in loans. That then forces prices downward. The bankster/vulture class then forces a swap of the asset to collapse (cancel) the debt instrument. In this case, the house is transferred to creditor to erase debts. The house transfers to collapse a money contract, which is a swap of unlike kinds. Vultures do the same thing, they don't necessarily want money in exchange for the debt instrument they have bought.

    With regards to double entry hypothecation – at the first instance of time, when debt instrument is signed ONLY THEN IS IT A MIRROR. The credit created and the debt claims are 1:1 only at the instant (minus fees). Later in time, the debt claims grow while the credit created does not. This is why debt claims destroy the natural world, as people rape the world converting forests to board feet of lumber, to then make a price, to then fetch money.

    In the first cycles of a loan it is ALL USURY. Worse it is seignorage. Seignorage is greater purchasing power now, whereas the money is worth less later.

    In the first cycles of the loan, the bank credit that you pay back, virtually none of it goes to paying off principle. The credit decrements the asset side of your ledger (your savings go down) and then point at the banker, to increase the asset side of his ledger. In the first cycles of the loan, your liability column (principle on the loan) goes down only slightly or not at all.

    This is pure usury, plain and simple. There is little to risk the loan emitter either, as a house is fungible and can be grabbed by law. If a real asset is attached to the double entry ledger, it is to lower risk to the creditor (banker), not the debtor. A double entry ledger can lie, or tell the truth. It would tell the truth if we used fees in this case and didn't hypothecate new credit. But, then again, as you mention most people are locked into a hypnotic trance.

    The proper way to do things is with sovereign money, not private corporate bank money at usury.

    http://www.sovereignmoney.eu

    Whenever a nations people demand their sovereignty, they are attacked by the usual suspects. A lot of people don't want to admit that both world wars were started by the finance class, with Jews as leading agents, to then demonize Germany.

    Germany had the temerity under the Kaiser to run an Industrial Capitalist Mixed Economy using its own sovereign credit, and then Hitler resurrected this system in 1933.

    Mefobills , says: December 22, 2019 at 1:36 am GMT
    @mcohen

    How about this paul ehrlich.next generation

    Oh, sorry a different Paul Ehrlich.

    You are only making my point. If a jew is in an honorable profession, he can be of benefit to the host society.

    Maybe Jews should also be limited from the press too, so they may not have a malign influence on easily duped goyim minds.

    But then, I don't want to lose the brave and honorable Jews like Ron Unz who are for the truth of things, even if it is damaging to their co-ethnics.

    9/11 Inside job , says: December 22, 2019 at 1:40 am GMT

    renegadetribune.com ; "US Court sentences Israeli CEO to 22 years for scamming Americans , media ignore it ":

    "The company specifically targeted the elderly and the vulnerable , one of over 100 companies perpetrating a scam called binary options Israel permitted the scam to go on for a decade "

    Will Trump pardon him before he leaves office ? The Jerusalem Post : " Trump pardons Israeli drug smuggler" after serving just 4 years of a 20 year sentence .

    Bookish1 , says: December 22, 2019 at 1:41 am GMT
    @Thomasina

    To get it straight: Trump is playing their game but not totally. He isn't invading Iran so the globalists aren't getting everything that they want.

    Bookish1 , says: December 22, 2019 at 1:51 am GMT
    @Digital Samizdat

    Maybe the dems want Trump in because they see a world war coming and the Republicans in for that.

    Hibernian , says: December 22, 2019 at 2:31 am GMT
    @Mr. Anon

    Contracts often have provisions for successors and assignees. The real question is whether the weaker party was sufficiently strong to know what they were signing and have a good chance of being able to carry out their side of the bargain. Many sovereign buyers are about as good risk as an unemployed man who wants to buy a car on credit.

    Lot , says: December 22, 2019 at 3:11 am GMT
    @silviosilver

    I agree this is a real problem, but no need to exaggerate. It isn't 99%. Outside of the USA, it is probably well under half.

    Desert Fox , says: December 22, 2019 at 3:28 am GMT
    @9/11 Inside job

    Trump will do anything his zionist masters tell him to do, I am sure they have enough videos of Trump to last a lifetime.

    KA , says: December 22, 2019 at 4:32 am GMT
    @Just passing through countries have been looted, the Jews have turned on the Whites and the latter are now crying that their criminal comrades have now betrayed them."

    It's called comeuppance.

    But IQ doesn't explain fully but the readiness to believe the west . Congo is particularly a sad case. It has been fighting a war for last 60 years .

    As far as Belgium is concerned, that nations should be swamped to the brim with Congolese making it burst at the seams .

    Who cares if some moronic Trump supporters get all shook up in Battle Creek . Who gives a toss ?

    Trump is a fraud , a huckster a corrupt filthy white thrash

    mcohen , says: December 22, 2019 at 4:39 am GMT
    @geokat62 iven the environmental damage said industries have caused. The vulture capitalists recover debt from failed states. A worthy cause indeed, especially for investors.

    mark green says:
    December 21, 2019 at 9:53 pm GMT • 100 Words

    @FvS
    The Koch Brothers (what's left of them; one died recently) are industrialists. They build things people want. They are innovators. Yes, the Koch Brothers are filthy rich but they employ tens of thousands of people in the US alone.

    Most importantly, the Koch Bros. are not parasitic, money-skimming extractors or wealth like the vulture capitalists described by Joyce.

    hotrod31 , says: December 22, 2019 at 8:03 am GMT
    @Colin Wright

    Should one suspect that your last question is, rhetorical? Quite, i'm sure.

    geokat62 , says: December 22, 2019 at 2:20 pm GMT
    @mcohen ly able to secure large amounts of debt at very favourable interest rates. But this very soon changed. The vultures at GS, after peering into the Greece's true financial records, knew how vulnerable Greek finances were and were betting heavily against Greek sovereign debt by shorting it. This soon drove borrowing rates sky high which made it nearly impossible for the Greek govt to roll over their short term debt obligations.

    So, thanks to the vulture capitalists at GS, a large percentage of the Greek population has been suffering and will continue to suffer under the austerity policies that were introduced in the wake of the financial crises.

    ANZ , says: December 22, 2019 at 3:08 pm GMT
    @annamaria d us out from the classic American tradition into the modern Zionist vision. These turncoats are a uniquely despicable lot since they come with smiles and handshakes to kill the soul of our nation.

    If history serves as a guide, it will take a government led by s strongman to right this ship. Democracy has proven too easily corruptible by a private banking cartel that can print its way to dominance. This cartel will select, groom, install and maintain their double agents into our political, economic and cultural spheres.

    Here is the most plain lesson I can take from this: don't allow privatized money as the national currency.

    Thales the Milesian , says: December 22, 2019 at 6:20 pm GMT
    @Mefobills

    I know you are not. Go and tell that to the World. Stop preaching democracy, and other crap.

    Mr. Singer will prosper as this is the will of the American people and you can do nothing to change that.

    Thales the Milesian , says: December 22, 2019 at 6:35 pm GMT
    @Thales the Milesian

    By the way Mefobills people like you are the problem. Sitting on your butt, doing nothing and whining.

    mcohen , says: December 22, 2019 at 8:10 pm GMT
    @geokat62

    Geo you cannot bullshit me.i am teflonika. Retitrement age was 55 but now it is 67.

    Great people.Failed state."They"stole his money.lol http://www.ekathimerini.com/218552/article/ekathimerini/community/they-stole-my-money-greek-dreams-of-retirement-turn-sour

    Robjil , says: December 22, 2019 at 8:57 pm GMT
    @mcohen oycott abroad. It did this by using a barter system: equipment and commodities were exchanged directly with other countries, circumventing the international banks. This system of direct exchange occurred without debt and without trade deficits. Germany's economic experiment, like Lincoln's, was short-lived; but it left some lasting monuments to its success, including the famous Autobahn, the world's first extensive superhighway.1

    Greece or any nation need not be in "debt". It is a game, a game of money printed out of thin air. All Greece has to do, is give up the debt game. Barter game is a better game.

    MrFoSquare , says: December 22, 2019 at 10:42 pm GMT

    @Buddy three.

    Roger Elletson, in his excellent book "Money: A Medium of Power"(Amazon), defines the purpose of usury: "Under the current monetary regime, the effect, and indeed the purpose, of usury is to create compounding (think 'little by little') monetary claims from usurers against the productive output and underlying assets of nations."

    In his unpublished manuscript, "The Triumph of Western Civilization," Elletson says: "What Parapometrics© now reveals, however, is that usury is the ultimate expression of parasitic (or mammonic) monetary law; it is the life principle of satanic power and human parasitism."

    Mefobills , says: December 23, 2019 at 1:13 am GMT
    @Robjil n proportion to the economies needs, as is what happened in Germany. Hitler laughed at the gold-men, and considered gold money as a tool used by the Jews in their "international capital game."

    Purchasing power was put into the German economy using Oeffa and Mefo bills. When the bills were discounted (redeemed) at a bank, said bank turned around and presented the bills to the Central Bank (Reichsbank). Reichsbank then created new Reichsmarks to pay off the Bills. In this way millions of marks of new credit flooded into the German economy. By 1938 the tax roles in Germany had almost tripled, and it was not due to Gold or "international credit."

    NoseytheDuke , says: December 23, 2019 at 1:16 am GMT
    @Thales the Milesian

    All that you and I really know about Mefobills is that information about the nature of money and economics is being freely given and appears to be much appreciated according to other commenters. We don't know anything about what other activities Mefobills is engaged in so your comment is nonsense thinly disguised as petty insults.

    Robjil , says: December 23, 2019 at 2:00 am GMT
    @Mefobills ding began.5

    In Billions for the Bankers, Debts for the People (1984), Sheldon Emry commented:

    Germany issued debt-free and interest-free money from 1935 and on, accounting for its startling rise from the depression to a world power in 5 years. Germany financed its entire government and war operation from 1935 to 1945 without gold and without debt, and it took the whole Capitalist and Communist world to destroy the German power over Europe and bring Europe back under the heel of the Bankers. Such history of money does not even appear in the textbooks of public (government) schools today.

    Caruthers , says: December 23, 2019 at 2:47 am GMT
    @Colin Wright

    The underdog in Israel are Palestinians. The Chosen, in Israel and elsewhere, treat them like vermin. The Israeli chosen are the most color-conscious and racist people in the Western world.

    Caruthers , says: December 23, 2019 at 2:54 am GMT
    @mcohen

    What benefit did the vulture capitalists give to the Greek people that they must now pay for with austerity?

    Achilles Wannabe , says: December 23, 2019 at 3:21 am GMT
    @Just passing through

    I would say WASP's and Jews savaged Germany in WW2. Perhaps then the Jews turned on the WASPS. But WASP's are a curious bunch. They seem to have absolutely no loyalty to their own people. Look at what they have done to the English white working class. WASP's also are very enamored of Jews. If anything their loyalty sees to be to the Jews and not their own

    Achilles Wannabe , says: December 23, 2019 at 3:46 am GMT

    "we should ditch the word capitalism for usuryism."

    Best idea I've heard in awhile. Likewise change Economics Departments to Usury Departments – at least in the Anglo=Judeo Sphere

    ivan , says: December 23, 2019 at 3:48 am GMT
    @Nonny Mouse

    That may be the case in the Exodus dramas but the idea of 'who is thy brother' was already made clear earlier in Genesis – the story of Abel and Cain. The later Jews and the Christians merely rediscovered what was the original plan : that is, that all mankind share one brotherhood under one God.

    mcohen , says: December 23, 2019 at 4:43 am GMT
    @MrFoSquare

    Mr 4

    Aah so more bullshit. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loans_and_interest_in_Judaism

    Caruthers , says: December 23, 2019 at 7:44 am GMT
    @mcohen

    So the Greek debt was caused by the purchase of too many weapons to defend against other countries like Turkey in NATO, an American-led organization that promises to provide security to all its member states? So the populace of a treaty-bound ally should suffer US-enforced austerity to have weapons so that vulture capitalists can enjoy large profits which they largely funnel to Jewish causes while the Jewish state never is expected to suffer austerity for weapons?

    Buddy , says: December 23, 2019 at 11:53 am GMT
    @MrFoSquare . The texts are diabolically equivocal and ingeniously interlocking. The exoteric interpretation is innocent (Torah) and full of plausible deniability, the esoteric interpretation is malevolent (Talmud), and the ultra-esoteric interpretation (Kabbalah) is Satanic. At the very bottom you have the ultimate esoteric language of gematria. The good news is that it is easy to see through the necromancy once you understand how money magic functions. But this is only possible if we refuse the temptation of greed. We have not done a very good job of resisting greed, and those of us who succumb to this temptation deserve to be swindled.
    Just passing through , says: December 23, 2019 at 1:28 pm GMT
    @Achilles Wannabe re to be Jewish, people like Joyce would be on the case saying it was all da jooz, but he isn't very keen to blame WASPs for the black-on-white violence in American public schools, makes ya wonder.

    WASP's also are very enamored of Jews. If anything their loyalty sees to be to the Jews and not their own

    Jews have always been present in the elite, WASPs identify with Jews because they identfy with the elite. I am quite sure even to this day, WASPs and Jews are working together, it is just that the lower rungs of White society are being overwhelmed first and it seems unlikely that these North-Eastern WASPs will feel the pain any time soon.

    Hibernian , says: December 23, 2019 at 1:50 pm GMT
    @Achilles Wannabe

    New England Neo-Calvinists never saw Southern and Border Anglo-Celts as brothers. Not at all. Thus the Civil War. As for their closer kin, poorer Mayflower, etc., descendants, they mixed in with Germans, Scandinavians, and, horror of horrors, the Irish, as they moved West. Bing Crosby was a Mayflower descendant.

    George F. Held , says: Website December 23, 2019 at 2:00 pm GMT
    @Truth3

    Trump is a bad president for the reasons you cite, but neither Pence nor any demorat would be better. So let him be

    silviosilver , says: December 23, 2019 at 8:31 pm GMT
    @eah conclusions?

    Joyce's conclusions -- that any of this behavior is uniquely "Jewish" -- are absurd. The facts he cites refer to no more than simply the standard operations of the market economy.

    Some people just loath the very concept of credit and finance, so they reflexively praise any "analysis" which they believe justifies their anger.

    Others are casting about for somebody or something to blame for their own incompetence -- the poor, downtrodden debtor "victims" -- and they too are happy to have their failings explained away.

    On the substantive issues, this essay is just hot air.

    silviosilver , says: December 23, 2019 at 8:39 pm GMT

    @jack daniels e financial system by allowing widespread bank failures. But the banking executives whose criminal incompetence and, in some cases, corruption led to the crisis should definitely have been jailed, or at least permanently barred from ever working in the industry again. (Liberal egalitarianism shouldn't so lightly get off the hook either. After all, it is lunatic egalitarians who insisted that blacks and hispanics are just as good credit risks as whites, and who demanded that banks extend loans even to obvious deadbeats.)

    This is an infinitely more important issue than bellyaching about "vulture" funds and trying to portray them as uniquely Jewish.

    silviosilver , says: December 23, 2019 at 8:46 pm GMT
    @Wyatt what they owe – in other words, to just give their money away?

    And if there's a predilection among jewish men to engage in predatory lending and collecting tactics that is disproportionate to their of the population, there's something about their genes or their culture that shapes them to be this way.

    Okay, but so what? Given that there's nothing immoral – and much that is beneficial – about lending and borrowing, why should this be any more of an issue than that west Africans genes help them excel at sportsball or east Asians genes at math and engineering?

    Caruthers , says: December 23, 2019 at 9:38 pm GMT
    @Just passing through

    Jewish elites are infinitely more tribal and ethnocentric than WASP elites, which is demonstrated by their charitable giving, which is far more narrowly focused on specifically Jewish causes than that of WASP elites is focused on specifically WASP causes.

    Given their small numbers, Jewish elites usually must make tactical alliances with Gentile elites; but when their ethnic interests conflict with general elite interests (e.g., Marxist class conflicts), the former will almost always prevail. Hence, any WASP "loyalty" to Jews as a group is foolish.

    Farrakhan.DDuke.AliceWalker.AllAgree , says: December 23, 2019 at 10:35 pm GMT
    @Mefobills this month's Executive Order Jews extracted from Trump declaring Jews to be a distinct race/nationality.

    Usury is a power relation, where you steal from others because you can. Laws are changed to enable the thefts.

    The people of Euro lineage, i.e., the descendants of Christendom, usually don't steal even when they easily could because they are naturally indifferent as to materialism, their complimentary instinctive drives being 1) for adventure in overcoming challenges while staying within the bounds of ethical self-restraint; and 2) intellectual curiosity to learn what's out there and how to harmoniously survive and coexist with realities discovered.

    renfro , says: December 24, 2019 at 1:52 am GMT
    @silviosilver ws: An Overview – Jstor
    https://www.jstor.org/stable/42909635
    by M Amir – ‎1971 – ‎Cited by 3 – ‎Related articles

    "The Jewish crime rate tends to be higher than that of non-Jews and other religious groups for white-collar offenses, that is, commercial or commercial finance.

    *Also where special laws have been enacted for religious groups the crime rate among Jews tended to be even higher.
    *Jews are found to be significantly over-represented in both fraudulent and genuine bankruptcies (almost ten times the rate of non-Jews)."

    silviosilver , says: December 24, 2019 at 2:33 am GMT
    @annamaria t's not news to me that hyperethnocentric Jewish financiers help fund hyperethnocentric Jewish organizations.

    Ultimately, though, that funding is a consequence of Jewish participation in the economy. So if that in itself is wrong, then this essay is not so much a criticism of Jewish behavior, but crosses over into a criticism of Jewish existence – how are you supposed to live if you're barred from economic participation? – which to me is a different kettle of fish altogether. As much as I hate the term, that's something even I would call anti-semitic (note the absence of sneer quotes, which for me are practically mandatory).

    silviosilver , says: December 24, 2019 at 2:45 am GMT
    @Mr. Anon er appetite for risk. See, sometimes I don't know that I'm not going to be repaid; it's just that I now assess the prospects of being repaid as failing to meet some risk criterion I have. Other people's risk assessments differ from mine, which creates a market for existing debt.

    Sometimes the market highly irrationally prices financial assets – most evident (in hindsight) at market peaks and troughs – so there are certainly some good opportunities in distressed debt. I just don't see that "vulture" funds which scan the market looking for distressed debt are doing anything fundamentally different to any other buyers of debt.

    Achilles Wannabe , says: December 24, 2019 at 4:59 am GMT
    @Hibernian ch and Germans from NY and the middle colonies like the Rockefellers Roosevelt's. Basically they are individualized deracinated people who are not even brothers to each other. They worship mammon – money and power. Jews are of course anything but deracinated. They are however the world's leading usurers so the WASP with his Protestant Ethic – usury sanctified – is bawled over by them – not just financially but psychologically. They have handed the Jews their universities, their cultural institutions. They are a people who gave themselves up to a people for whom there is no one but themselves. The rest of us are just along for the ride – treacherous as it is
    Hibernian , says: December 24, 2019 at 5:13 am GMT
    @silviosilver

    I'd be very surprised if the last sentence of the above excerpt was true. Also it's a no brainer that US courts are more favorable to foreigners than third world courts are.

    Mr. Anon , says: December 24, 2019 at 5:44 am GMT
    @silviosilver

    A bond is a financial asset, and like other financial assets it can be bought and sold virtually at will.

    Yes, but a bond is also an agreement between two parties to lend money and to pay it back.

    Mr. Anon , says: December 24, 2019 at 5:56 am GMT
    @silviosilver ought legal recourse to exact repayment?

    No, but they shouldn't necessarily expect to get it. They took the risk in lending to a bad credit-risk. At least they provided something of value – the money. Singer's fund provides nothing of value. They're just parasites.

    Should they simply be forced to "lend" to people who are completely unwilling to pay what they owe – in other words, to just give their money away?

    Nobody forced them to lend anything. They did it of their own accord. They didn't have to make the loans. They could have done something else with the money.

    Elsztain and Mindlin, both Top Jews, now control Argentina.

    Elsztain and Mindlin's close connections to a merging network of some of the most powerful globalists in the world today suggest their role to be one of sniffing out the opportunities and laying the groundwork for hostile take-over of resources and infrastructure by these elite scavengers who prey upon target nations, protected from view by the likes of Elsztain and Mindlin, who are little more than mafia outreach agents."

    Robjil , says: December 24, 2019 at 12:12 pm GMT
    @silviosilver nterest in relations with Israel comes as a number of Central and South American countries, notably Brazil, have adopted increasingly pro-Israel positions in line with policies of US President Donald Trump.

    Guatemala opened a new embassy in Jerusalem al-Quds in occupied Palestine shortly after the US formally transferred its embassy from Tel Aviv to the city in May 2018, which prompted worldwide condemnation and anger among Palestinians.

    In August, Honduras also recognized Jerusalem al-Quds as the the so-called capital of Israel and announced that it sought to open a diplomatic office there.

    Caruthers , says: December 24, 2019 at 9:06 pm GMT
    @mcohen callously don't care about the suffering they cause, or sadistically delight in it. The more distressed mortgages they can find at a discount, the more homes they can seize, the more non-co-ethnics they can render homeless, the happier they are. Like Gordon Gekko, and unlike bankers who lend money for production of goods, they don't produce anything -- -they simply parasitize the lending and borrowing of the productive economy.
    If they are an asset to society, if their activities are a boon to society, let them practice those activities exclusively in Israel and among their own coethnics elsewhere, and contravene Talmudic injunctions.
    mcohen , says: December 24, 2019 at 9:45 pm GMT
    @Caruthers

    "Co ethnics" lol

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-china-bonds-vultures-insight/chinas-fledgling-junk-bond-market-spawns-new-breed-of-vulture-funds-idUSKCN1QH32O

    Just a matter of time before the arrive in your neighborhood.They love pork in a barrel

    Talmudic indeed.Take your vanilla flavoured anti semitism and piss off.

    Robjil , says: December 24, 2019 at 11:29 pm GMT
    @mcohen

    That is companies in China fighting with each other. It is vulture funds on a small scale.

    It not hurting or attacking struggling nations on a grand scale such as Paul Singer and his ilk does.

    renfro , says: December 25, 2019 at 4:19 am GMT
    @silviosilver

    Okay, but so what? Given that there's nothing immoral – and much that is beneficial – about lending and borrowing, why should this be any more of an issue than that west Africans genes

    You don't get the difference between the Jewish white collar crime and Africans being good at sports ball?
    That comparison doesnt make sense.

    annamaria , says: December 25, 2019 at 2:36 pm GMT
    @silviosilver history of Jews in Russia during the Bolshevik revolution? The kettle and fish fit right: Mr. Snger has been financing the Holo-museums while destroying the lives of the millions in South America. Pushing the ball-point (!) written story of Anne Frank upon American kids while immiserating hundreds of thousands of Argentian kids is morally ugly. Ugly.

    As for antisemitism, the involvement of US leading zionists, and the Jewish State itself, in supporting Ukrainian banderites (self-proclaimed neo-nazi) has buried the canard of antisemitism forever. There is no hope for the moral recovery of your Holobiz Museums and "eternal victimhood" memes.

    Achilles Wannabe , says: December 26, 2019 at 2:15 am GMT
    @annamaria

    Actually we get the Jewish version of the history of Jews in Germany as we get the Jewish version of our own history – founding to Trump. It is breathtaking how Jews, Semophiles and people who are intimidated by Jews and Semophiles have created how we understand ourselves. This has been going on since Dec 7, 1941. There is almost no one left who remembers when stand up Euro Gentiles wrote history

    eah , says: December 26, 2019 at 12:55 pm GMT
    @annamaria in a speech he gave at Brown in 1966, George Lincoln Rockwell addressed the role of Jews in the Russian Revolution -- you can listen to the speech here –> Brown link -- he covers similar material in a 1967 speech at UCLA –> UCLA link .
    Malla , says: December 26, 2019 at 5:22 pm GMT

    One must take lessons from the great ruler Frederick the Great of Prussia about how to deal with Jewish scams. You see, Jewish scams have a long history. And most of these Jewish scamsters donate a lot of money to Jewish organisations.

    Well Frederick the Great came up with a novel and effective solution to all this. He just charged the official Jewish organisations the amount in money in loss to Prussian society due to such scams. Guess What? The Jewish scams stopped. Totally stopped.

    "Oy Vey" screamed the Jews, "All the money ended up in the hands of the cursed goyim and all our efforts and hard work in scamming went to waste. "

    Makes me wonder if Democracy is really a better form of government than Monarchy.

    Caruthers , says: December 27, 2019 at 1:40 am GMT
    @mcohen

    Joyce's article contends that the victims of these Jewish vulture capitalists are overwhelmingly goyim, while the ultimate benefactors (through their charitable donations) are Jews. You never dispute, let alone refute, this contention. However, you do contend that these vulture capitalists somehow benefit society as a whole (through some sort of economic "discipline" or whatever), but resent the suggestion that they confine this beneficial discipline (like they confine their charitable donations) to Jews, a suggestion you call "antisemitic".

    Achilles Wannabe , says: December 28, 2019 at 5:43 am GMT
    @Skeptikal

    Yeah, that is it. In college I knew a Brahmin intimately. I was struck by the contrast between her quiet classic WASP disdain towards ordinary white conventionality and her near awe of what I thought of as Jewish vulgarity -chutzpah.

    There was something ersatz Semitic in the original New England Puritanism = a sort of Jewish 1.0. Now the WASP's think the Jews are better at their game than they are. They are right of course. The question is should anyone be playing that game.

    Platypus jr , says: December 28, 2019 at 1:24 pm GMT
    @sally

    Zionism is a political ideology, not an economic system.

    silviosilver , says: December 29, 2019 at 3:08 pm GMT
    @annamaria

    There is no hope for the moral recovery of your Holobiz Museums and "eternal victimhood" memes.

    Well, I'm not one of (((them))), so I actually hope you're proven right about this.

    silviosilver , says: December 29, 2019 at 3:16 pm GMT
    @Mr. Anon

    Singer's fund provides nothing of value. They're just parasites.

    We were talking about the nature of bonds. The fact bond/debt can be bought and sold does provide value – it makes it more likely that the credit which business need to expand and to hire workers will be provided, and provided at a lower interest rate. So the existence of the Singers of the world, troubling as it might be to you or me (in my case, given what he does with his money), is best regarded as providing indirect value – in the sense that they make our credit system possible.

    eah , says: December 30, 2019 at 12:53 am GMT
    @silviosilver thin air, then loaned out at interest and/or against real assets as collateral, and/or perhaps traded by 'vultures' -- or the part of the "credit system" that burdens millions of young adults with debt in the form of student loans, which ultimately is also money created out of nothing and loaned to them.

    Within a few years, interest on the national debt will be the second largest federal expenditure, i.e. even greater than defense spending -- always left unexplained is why the US, a sovereign entity with the authority to issue currency, has to borrow money to run a deficit.

    Yes, what a great "credit system".

    Hibernian , says: December 30, 2019 at 3:28 am GMT
    @eah

    Fractional reserve banking (unstable and exploitative) and assignment of debt to assignees/purchasers (provided the borrower has agreed to a covenant allowing this) are two separate issues. It is possible to have either one without the other. The idea that you're released from your debt if your lender dies or moves to a far off city or gets worn out trying to collect or whatever is a notion worthy of a junior high school juvenile delinquent. Also if national sovereignty means the right to welsh on debts, then no one in his right mind will lend to a sovereign nation and then they cannot get credit.

    eah , says: December 30, 2019 at 9:53 am GMT
    @Hibernian

    (of course this will have consequences too; living beyond one's means indefinitely always does eventually).

    Student loan debt is massively detrimental to affordable family formation -- I also see it as immoral to burden young people in this way.

    Multi-generational national indebtedness is profoundly immoral -- it's a disgrace that there is little to no recognition of this, or outrage about what is going on.

    silviosilver , says: December 30, 2019 at 12:41 pm GMT
    @eah edit system" that burdens millions of young adults with debt in the form of student loans, which ultimately is also money created out of nothing and loaned to them.

    That's much more a consequence of the prevailing American attitude towards higher education – that individuals should pay for it rather than the state – than it is the monetary system.

    If fractional reserve banking is nothing more than "creating money out of nothing," then don't you ever ask yourself how it is that a bank could find itself in financial trouble? Why doesn't it just create some more money out of thin air and put itself back in the black?

    Hibernian , says: December 30, 2019 at 12:58 pm GMT

    @eah ts, although for individuals some are protected, or a repayment plan (for individuals) or a reorganization plan (for corporations.) It requires the payment of often large legal fees. It's not equivalent to walking away (although sometimes it looks like close to the same thing) or having the debt forgiven based on political pressure, and it doesn't have anything to do with whether any of the creditors are assignees who bought the paper, or not.

    Printing press finance just means that government, instead of private interests, defrauds the people. Edison was a great inventor but hardly a sophisticated economic and /or political thinker.

    Hibernian , says: December 30, 2019 at 1:09 pm GMT
    @eah out better than others. If paying $0.10 on the dollar automatically made you rich, the world would have a lot more billionaires than it does now. The rate would quickly be bid up to $0.95 on the dollar in no time flat. Also, legal fees and other collection costs (towing away or storing ships, etc.) need to be taken into account.

    I suspect that Mr. Singer may use his political influence to get the US, and likely some other governments, to aid in the collections. That is an issue in itself. That is where the ethical issue lies. As another poster mentioned, the way he uses his money (his idea of the good of society) is also an issue.

    Hibernian , says: December 30, 2019 at 1:21 pm GMT
    @silviosilver

    The answer to your last sentence is that the government places limits through reserve requirements. If this were not so a run on the bank could end the charade. Sometimes these runs still happen and the FDIC steps in. Unlike the government, the bank has to redeem its paper (checks and passbooks) on demand. The government has not done this for private parties since 1933, or for foreign governments since 1971. It can and does tell you to just continue circulating the paper, which creditors are required to accept, no matter how watered down it is.

    eah , says: December 30, 2019 at 2:08 pm GMT
    @Hibernian it has full authority to do, instead of selling debt , taxpayers, including future generations of taxpayers, are nor burdened with interest payments, nor with repayment of principal .

    Edison was a great inventor but hardly a sophisticated economic and /or political thinker.

    Sure bud, whatever you say -- the essential question here is, was he correct in his statement re debt issuance and who benefits from it, also its disadvantages, vs dollar issuance? -- the answer is yes, he clearly was: it makes no sense for a government to sell debt when it can just spend money .

    eah , says: December 30, 2019 at 2:21 pm GMT
    @silviosilver uch more a consequence of the prevailing American attitude towards higher education – that individuals should pay for it rather than the state – than it is the monetary system.

    Sure, right -- BOOM!, suddenly the "the prevailing American attitude towards higher education", also young people, just changed, and within a generation or so, it was decided to exploit the hell out of them and burden them with huge amounts of debt .

    "LOL" -- you are naive.

    Regardless of the etiology, student debt is immoral and something must be done about it.

    Hibernian , says: December 30, 2019 at 5:39 pm GMT

    Bankruptcy law, like other laws, limits the discretion of judges. Sure, in practice, this is aspirational. As is the notion that some judges deviations from the law are motivated by fairness.

    "LOL" -- yeah, "what's the difference?" -- at least in the case of a government spending money into existence, which it has full authority to do, instead of selling debt, taxpayers, including future generations of taxpayers, are nor burdened with interest payments, nor with repayment of principal.

    A super iconoclast vis a vis businessmen, especially if they're Jewish, but a true believer that Government is the same thing as The People, or at least represents them perfectly or almost perfectly.

    it makes no sense for a government to sell debt when it can just spend money.

    And it makes no sense to work, save, be frugal, borrow only as necessary, and pay back what you borrow, when you can write bad checks oh wait Government is Divinely Anointed! It is of the People, by the People, and for the People!

    Which one of us is being obtuse? I'll leave it as an exercise for the student.

    Ginger Bread Man , says: December 30, 2019 at 7:56 pm GMT

    So, can anyone tell my why Jewish people would want to fund homosexual causes? What benefit does it give them? I'm just beginning to understand the mass migration thing, but still neither of these seem explicitly Jewish. Doesn't the Torah ban homosexuality? Just wondering

    Barb Weir , says: December 31, 2019 at 1:52 am GMT

    @HammerJack flak," said Standiford.

    Carnegie was born in 1836 in Dunfermline, Fife. His father was a handloom weaver and an active Chartist who marched for the rights of the working man. So when Andrew went to sleep every night knowing he had starved, beaten and killed his factory workers, he spent his $$$$ trying to assuage his conscience.
    Andrew is not a hero, hero's don't kill their employees by starvation and shooting!

    Despicable man, trying to pave his way to Heaven.

    Similar to Mr. Bloomberg who states that his path to heaven is assured by his good works.

    Gag me with a Gomulka please.

    Barb Weir , says: December 31, 2019 at 1:58 am GMT
    @Anon " said Standiford.

    Carnegie was born in 1836 in Dunfermline, Fife. His father was a handloom weaver and an active Chartist who marched for the rights of the working man. So when Andrew went to sleep every night knowing he had starved, beaten and killed his factory workers, he spent his $$$$ trying to assuage his conscience.
    Andrew is not a hero, hero's don't kill their employees by starvation and shooting!

    Despicable man, trying to pave his way to Heaven.

    Similar to Mr. Bloomberg who states that his path to heaven is assured by his good works.

    Gag me with a Gomulka please.

    Ginger bread man , says: December 31, 2019 at 2:57 am GMT
    @geokat62

    Interesting, where does it mention homosexuality?

    geokat62 , says: December 31, 2019 at 4:44 am GMT
    @Ginger bread man

    This was the Frankfurt School's great insight. The best way to undermine a sense of nationalism is to divide the people through the promotion of identity politics, including LGBTQ.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-08-12/birth-cultural-marxism-how-frankfurt-school-changed-america

    eah , says: December 31, 2019 at 6:43 pm GMT

    Some of what Paul Singer does with his money: create front organizations to recruit Christians in the effort to make the Middle East safe for Israel, and the world safe for Jews:

    tweet

    This guy is competing for world's top butt goy. Unfortunately there is a lot of competition. The author, Robert Nicholson, is President of Philos Project, a pro-Zionist "Christian" organization that is funded by Paul Singer.

    The above tweet refers to this piece in the NY Post by Robert Nicholson, director of the 'Philos Project':

    American Christians should lead the fight against anti-Semitism

    An interesting blog post from a few years ago (2015) re the sudden appearance of the 'Philos Project' -- even today it is difficult to find info (eg financial) on this organization:

    The Jewish Billionaire Behind A New Christian Anti-Iran Group

    [Jan 01, 2020] Bernie Could Win the Nomination

    Notable quotes:
    "... For corporate Democrats and their profuse media allies, the approach of disparaging and minimizing Bernie Sanders in 2019 didn't work. In 2020, the next step will be to trash him with a vast array of full-bore attacks. ..."
    "... When the Bernie campaign wasn't being ignored by corporate media during 2019, innuendos and mud often flew in his direction. But we ain't seen nothing yet. ..."
    Dec 29, 2019 | www.truthdig.com

    A central premise of conventional media wisdom has collapsed. On Thursday, both the New York Times and Politico published major articles reporting that Bernie Sanders really could win the Democratic presidential nomination. Such acknowledgments will add to the momentum of the Bernie 2020 campaign as the new year begins -- but they foreshadow a massive escalation of anti-Sanders misinformation and invective.

    Throughout 2019, corporate media routinely asserted that the Sanders campaign had little chance of winning the nomination. As is so often the case, journalists were echoing each other more than paying attention to grassroots realities. But now, polling numbers and other indicators on the ground are finally sparking very different headlines from the media establishment.

    From the Times : " Why Bernie Sanders Is Tough to Beat ." From Politico : " Democratic Insiders: Bernie Could Win the Nomination ."

    Those stories, and others likely to follow in copycat news outlets, will heighten the energies of Sanders supporters and draw in many wavering voters. But the shift in media narratives about the Bernie campaign's chances will surely boost the decibels of alarm bells in elite circles where dousing the fires of progressive populism is a top priority.

    For corporate Democrats and their profuse media allies, the approach of disparaging and minimizing Bernie Sanders in 2019 didn't work. In 2020, the next step will be to trash him with a vast array of full-bore attacks.

    Along the way, the corporate media will occasionally give voice to some Sanders defenders and supporters. A few establishment Democrats will decide to make nice with him early in the year. But the overwhelming bulk of Sanders media coverage -- synced up with the likes of such prominent corporate flunkies as Rahm Emanuel and Neera Tanden as well as Wall Street Democrats accustomed to ruling the roost in the party -- will range from condescending to savage.

    When the Bernie campaign wasn't being ignored by corporate media during 2019, innuendos and mud often flew in his direction. But we ain't seen nothing yet.

    With so much at stake -- including the presidency and the top leadership of the Democratic Party -- no holds will be barred. For the forces of corporate greed and the military-industrial complex, it'll be all-out propaganda war on the Bernie campaign.

    While reasons for pessimism are abundant, so are ample reasons to understand that a Sanders presidency is a real possibility . The last places we should look for political realism are corporate media outlets that distort options and encourage passivity.

    Bernie is fond of quoting a statement from Nelson Mandela: "It always seems impossible until it is done."

    From the grassroots, as 2020 gets underway, the solution should be clear: All left hands on deck.


    Jan Goslinga • 38 minutes ago ,

    Elections aren't real. Democrats will nominate Joe Biden to lose the election. Trump will remain as fascist strongman and the dems will continue to blame his neoconservative policies on his white trash constituency.

    Bernie serves a few important functions.
    1. he keeps the radicals from leaving the plantation and going 3rd party.
    2. his promotion of progressive policies will make Biden less popular and help him lose to Trump
    3. Bernie and his "socialism" can then be blamed for losing the election to Trump

    Maxwell Jan Goslinga • 15 minutes ago ,

    Unfortunately this comment will be buried in this monstrosity of a thread- now at over 300 comments with only about a third of them having a much relevance.

    You might consider re-posting in reply to one of the foremost comments. Your simple realism will certainly not be well received during the campaign hallucinations.

    I've often wondered how it is people could believe the elections could have any positive and lasting impact on their lives if they have been through a couple of cycles. Do they not also wonder how it is that these election (marketing) campaigns now stretch out for well over a year nowadays demanding everyone's political attention, energy and resources. To say it is a colossal waste does not quite capture the enormity of the mind job being to people.

    Mensch59 Maxwell • 8 minutes ago • edited ,

    Your simple realism will certainly not be well received during the campaign hallucinations.

    Yeah, yeah, sure, sure. You "realists" who are true believers that you have the Truth and have a calling to preach the Truth absolutely must stand against the unwashed masses who claim that your "reality" isn't even intersubjectively verifiable, much less dialectical & material [eta & historical ].

    I quite enjoyed what SteelPirate/LaborSolidarity had to say about you attempting to gain a vanguard following by trolling lib-prog sites.

    Mensch59 Jan Goslinga • 21 minutes ago ,

    Elections aren't real.

    Never pay attention to anyone who claims what's "real" and what isn't. Politics certainly doesn't exist in the realm of an objective, concrete, physical, naturalistic, materialistic reality which is shared by a consensus of rational observers. At best, politics deals with intersubjectively verifiable social phenomena. Thus, politics is mostly idealistic in the belief that each mind generates its own reality.

    This realization is the topic of intersubjective verifiability, as recounted, for example, by Max Born (1949, 1965) Natural Philosophy of Cause and Chance , who points out that all knowledge, including natural or social science, is also subjective. p. 162: "Thus it dawned upon me that fundamentally everything is subjective, everything without exception. That was a shock."
    newestbeginning • 2 hours ago ,

    Meanwhile the wealth of the world's top 500 grew 25% in 2019...

    https://www.livemint.com/ne...

    V4V • 2 hours ago • edited ,

    Noam Chomsky on Bernie Sanders's Chances of Success- "...the chances he can be elected are pretty small." (Waiting with bated breath for copious downvotes by those who hate the truth and hate reality).

    https://cdn.embedly.com/widgets/media.html?src=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fembed%2FEpXJvWSa4FQ%3Ffeature%3Doembed&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DEpXJvWSa4FQ&image=https%3A%2F%2Fi.ytimg.com%2Fvi%2FEpXJvWSa4FQ%2Fhqdefault.jpg&key=21d07d84db7f4d66a55297735025d6d1&type=text%2Fhtml&schema=youtube

    PGGreen V4V • 2 hours ago • edited ,

    Most of who support Sanders know that his presidency will involve an uphill battle. Chomsky is being realistic.

    But there really is no better option for meaningful change working within the political system than supporting Sanders. it is also important to note that "Our Revolution" has energized many young activists, encouraging them to continue the fight. This goes beyond politics to social and economic issues. If Sanders leaves us with a movement, this may turn out to be more important than the presidency in the long run.

    Keep working for effective moral and economic justice and democracy!

    V4V PGGreen • an hour ago ,

    Well, I have said this several times, it's not the microscopic left that you need to convince, it's the majority of self-identifying Democrats not supporting Sanders that you need to convince. I am repelled by the Democratic Party, but there are millions who identify as Democrats and many are proud of it. You need to convince them, not us.

    PGGreen V4V • 21 minutes ago • edited ,

    Yes, although I don't think that those who support a Leftist agenda--whether you actually call them Leftists or not--are quite so microscopic a group as you imply. But you don't need to convince me or most others here (probably) that Sanders isn't perfect, or that it will be difficult for him to be elected president. We already know; we simply consider him the best option within this context of voting.

    Have you ever thought of turning your approach to systemic commentary (which is valid and interesting, BTW, I'm not discounting it) around and saying what candidates you support-- in this context being discussed of voting-- instead of which ones you don't? And then explaining why such support would be effective?

    I would say that what is wrong with the world is more a fault of the economic and political system than of Sanders alone--who not only plays small part in causing what is wrong, but a significant part in trying to correct it. Yes, he works within the system. That is a given. It may be, as Chris Hedges thinks, that there is no hope working within the system. But Noam Chomsky's approach also bears serious consideration that even Hedges doesn't discount. Voting will only be a small part of what brings about change, but it may make some slight difference--if you can stomach it. And it only takes a small amount of time.

    "In a system of immense power, small differences can translate into large outcomes."

    I don't see much of an argument that Sanders will be no better as president than Trump (and if you think so, I'd like to hear you argue it). I suspect you find the compromise unpalatable. I can understand that. I, too, draw the line at a certain point. I couldn't vote for HRC.

    Yes, Sanders isn't perfect. Chomsky also said another important thing: "We're all compromised." Everyone who is a citizen of the US is compromised, and bears some measure of responsibility for the military interventions undertaken by our government. Perhaps we should renounce our citizenship, refuse to pay taxes, etc. But most of us don't -- not even those of us committed to activist work in other ways -- significant ways -- to make things better.

    So what are those ways, for you?

    V4V PGGreen • 6 minutes ago ,

    But you don't need to convince me or most others here (probably) that Sanders isn't perfect

    -for me it isn' that he's not perfect, it's that I think he sucks

    "In a system of immense power, small differences can translate into large outcomes."

    -funny, that's a favorite line of Democrats

    I get that, but it doesn't negate that Sanders's chances are next to nil.

    Your suggestion of me signaling whom I support would fall on deaf ears around here. I have said this many times- I will probably for the Green Party candidate or the Socialist Equality Party candidate. If only a Democrat and Republican appear on the ballot then I would refuse to vote even if I had to pay a fine. I am not in the habit of telling anyone whom to vote for unless asked.

    Before a 3rd can succeed, the fantasy that the fix can come through the Democrats needs to be destroyed. Not to worry, in due time it will be obvious.

    Mensch59 PGGreen • 16 minutes ago ,

    My guess/bet is that V4V believes that the truth "We're all compromised" doesn't apply to him.
    He sees himself as a truth-knower and a truth-teller.
    He won't commit to logical argumentation.
    He'll preach the truth to you.

    Patrick_Walker V4V • 2 hours ago • edited ,

    I saw this video long ago--and agreed with it. But though Sanders' chances are small, they're still vastly larger than the NONEXISTENT chances of success of the purist, "Born to Lose" left. Why not just admit that you've totally given up and simply like to spent your time bitching and criticizing those of us with some (albeit small) hope?

    V4V Patrick_Walker • an hour ago • edited ,

    simply like to spent your time bitching and criticizing those of us with some (albeit small) hope?

    -straw man

    That isn't what I do because I couldn't care less whom Democrats support and vote for. Typically, I post some unpleasant truth about Sanders, like his lackluster polling numbers or his support for neoliberal warmongers and sit back and watch the ad hominems and downvotes roll in. I am not normally on the attack, I am usually on the receiving end.

    I admit that I see this forum as a form of entertainment. I admit I have zero expectation that someone to my liking will be elected president and that the system is going to change anytime soon. Do I believe it possible? Yes, I believe it is possible, I just don't believe it possible using the corrupt, Democratic Party as a vehicle and that's where we differ.

    And that the crux of our issue- you believe the Democratic Party can be used a vehicle to convert the CIA/Wall Street/War Inc. Democrats into the peoples' party, and I do not. If the needed changes are ever to arrive, it will be in spite of the Democrats not because of them. I hope you stick around because in due time I'll be telling you, "Told ya so."

    acme V4V • an hour ago ,

    The problem with your position is that, unlike Sanders, you don't seem to understand that a third candidate party candidate hasn't a snowball's chance in hell of being president unless if s/he somehow gets more electoral votes that both the major parties combined. If not, it goes to the house, and in the current partisan atmosphere, would be decided for the candidate of the House majority.
    The major parties have a death-grip on the presidency while the electoral college exists.

    V4V acme • an hour ago • edited ,

    You don't seem to understand that Sanders has a snowball's chance in hell of being the Democratic Party candidate for many reasons including the DNC arguing in court it is a private corporation and can legally rig primary and the trusty superdelegates for Biden.

    What I propose is a movement outside the Democratic Party in inside it. I believe any attempt to reform the Democratic Party is doomed to fail. All this whistling in the dark over Sanders is a distraction and a kicking the can down the road to the time you Democrats finally realize it isn't going to work. You obviously didn't learn it in 2016, and I would be surprised if you learn it once Sanders tanks and begins campaigning for Biden just like he did Clinton. I will promise this, I'll say, "I told ya so" in a matter of months. That's okay, play it again, Sam.

    Zsuzsi Kruska • 4 hours ago • edited ,

    People believe they need others to tell them what to do and give them the illusion somebody cares about them and has their best interests at heart. That's an archetype in the brain that goes back to our baby/childhood when we were dependent on our caregivers for sustenance, comfort and life itself.That's where the original concept of needing "leaders" comes from. But, what happens is psyco/sociopaths see this weakness in humanity and force their way to the top, to herd and exploit the gullible sheeple for their own agendas and selfish interests. No matter who rises to the top, she/he got their through the same system that's been going on since tribes had their chief; chief's lieutenant and witch doctor/shaman. Those three keep the tribe in line with their own desires. Chief through brute force, his lieutenant through information and witch doctor through religion and "spiritual" services; and all three require tribute and fees from the rest of the tribe. So, you will see, regardless of who the next POTUS will be, that same structure, although more complex today, will repeat itself. New boss/old boss, same ol' same ol'. All power has to be returned to the people at the local level before Wash. starts WWIII. But, if that happens, at least we won't have to worry about global warming with a nuclear winter after the bombs drop.


    trilobytegames • 3 days ago ,

    As usual, I find your analysis and commentary honest and accurate. However, I do take exception to your pulling out these canards:
    "Trump's contempt of Congress and attempt to get Volodymyr Zelensky, the Ukrainian president, to open an investigation of Joe Biden and his son, Hunter, in exchange for almost $400 million in U.S. military aid and allowing Zelensky to visit the White House are impeachable offenses"

    Trump has certain executive privileges and him being guilty of contempt of Congress should be up to the Supreme Court to decide. Jonathan Turley in his testimony made that quite clear. Military aid was never mentioned in the phone call. Zelensky was unaware aid would be withheld. So if Trump were using the money as a means to induce Zelensky to do those favors, it was a totally botched one. To quote Dr. Strangelove, "The whole point of the doomsday machine is lost...if you keep it a secret!"

    Nir Haramati • 3 days ago • edited ,

    New avenues for accountability and oversight became possible in Washington, D.C., in 2019, following the election of a new Democratic Party majority in the House (and the most diverse Congress ever) in the 2018 midterms. As a result, Democrats took hold of the subpoena power that rests in the House of Representatives, along with the power to set the agenda across congressional committees. As a result, 2019 has been full of important moments for congressional oversight of both the Trump administration and private business. Here are five of the most important moments in congressional oversight in 2019.

    1. Betsy DeVos, Are You "Too Corrupt" or "Too Incompetent"? ...
    2. Big Bank CEOs Are Stumped by Simple Budgets ...
    3. Wells Fargo Announces Plan to Divest From Private Prisons in Congressional Testimony ...
    4. Rep. Ilhan Omar vs. Elliott Abrams ...
    5. Voting to Impeach the President ...

    Congressional Oversight Claimed Important Victories in 2019. Here Are the Top 5

    The only people who lie and obfuscate facts as much as Trump and his GOP cult are neo progressive demagogues and propaganda buffs like Chris 'regime-change-in-America' Hedges.

    Kaptain Amerika • 3 days ago • edited ,

    Absolutely bush should have been impeached, convicted, removed and executed for war crimes and mass murder.

    But because he wasn't doesn't mean that our orange Fuhrer shouldn't be.
    He is the most dangerous authoritarian propagandist and threat to this country since Hitler.

    Dr Hacksaw Kaptain Amerika • 3 days ago • edited ,

    "[Trump] is the most dangerous authoritarian propagandist and threat to this country since Hitler."

    Correction, Kaptain: Since Obama.

    rosemariejackowski Dr Hacksaw • 3 days ago ,

    THE MOST DANGEROUS IN HISTORY....
    https://countercurrents.org...

    Kaptain Amerika Dr Hacksaw • 3 days ago ,

    NObama was a horrible POTUS for the 99% and is THE reason why we have trump, but he didn't poison every aspect of the government and everything else like your orange Fuhrer is doing, which is the exact same tactic that Hitler used to create Nazi Germany.

    Ron Ruggieri Dr Hacksaw • 3 days ago ,

    The generic Left is ignoring this aspect of the Trump impeachment circus . The whole farce IS political. Now Senator Lisa Murkowski wants her Republican Party to rise above politics ( and do the wrong thing ? ). In the past three years when did the Democrat Party ever rise above politics ? Politics USA is always CLASS politics, always IMPERIALIST , MILITARIST politics . All the " liberal " Democrats have been slobbering over the UN-ELECTED shadow government of the United States , the National Security Police State , slobbering over FBI, CIA bureaucrats , uniformed officials of the Pentagon War Crimes Machine . Join them ?

    This Senator Lisa Murkowski -no surprise - is in good standing with the Israel Lobby collectively determined to nullify the 2016 presidential election . NEWS clip :

    [ "There are about 6 million Jewish people living in America, so as a percentage it's quite small, but in terms of influence its quite big," Farage said. Farage seemed to question why Israel was not facing election-meddling accusations, saying Israeli groups "have a voice within American politics" but "I don't think anybody is suggesting that the Israeli government tried to affect the result of the American elections."]

    Did not the Kafkaesque Trump impeachment hearings look and sound like Old Yiddish Theater soap opera ? How many working class Christian Americans have heartfelt moral and cultural ties to the Ukraine of all places, now celebrating its first Jewish friend of Zionist Apartheid Israel president ? Who in the USA authorized this character to wage a proxy war against post-communist Russia ? WE THE PEOPLE ?
    Guess WHO is promoting the HATE RUSSIA, New McCarthyism ?

    VallejoD • 3 days ago ,

    $748 billion in 2020 for the military death machine equals $23 MILLION A SECOND.

    How many schools or hospitals could have been built, how many roads or bridges repaired, how many students educated with the money the MIC has squandered in the few seconds it has taken me to write this?

    We are destroying our people from the inside out. This is treason.

    [Jan 01, 2020] A central premise of conventional media wisdom has collapsed. On Thursday, both the New York Times and Politico published major articles reporting that Bernie Sanders really could win the Democratic presidential nomination

    Notable quotes:
    "... New York Times ..."
    Dec 29, 2019 | www.truthdig.com

    A central premise of conventional media wisdom has collapsed. On Thursday, both the New York Times and Politico published major articles reporting that Bernie Sanders really could win the Democratic presidential nomination. Such acknowledgments will add to the momentum of the Bernie 2020 campaign as the new year begins -- but they foreshadow a massive escalation of anti-Sanders misinformation and invective.

    Throughout 2019, corporate media routinely asserted that the Sanders campaign had little chance of winning the nomination. As is so often the case, journalists were echoing each other more than paying attention to grassroots realities. But now, polling numbers and other indicators on the ground are finally sparking very different headlines from the media establishment.

    From the Times : " Why Bernie Sanders Is Tough to Beat ." From Politico : " Democratic Insiders: Bernie Could Win the Nomination ."

    Those stories, and others likely to follow in copycat news outlets, will heighten the energies of Sanders supporters and draw in many wavering voters. But the shift in media narratives about the Bernie campaign's chances will surely boost the decibels of alarm bells in elite circles where dousing the fires of progressive populism is a top priority.

    For corporate Democrats and their profuse media allies, the approach of disparaging and minimizing Bernie Sanders in 2019 didn't work. In 2020, the next step will be to trash him with a vast array of full-bore attacks.

    Along the way, the corporate media will occasionally give voice to some Sanders defenders and supporters. A few establishment Democrats will decide to make nice with him early in the year. But the overwhelming bulk of Sanders media coverage -- synced up with the likes of such prominent corporate flunkies as Rahm Emanuel and Neera Tanden as well as Wall Street Democrats accustomed to ruling the roost in the party -- will range from condescending to savage.

    When the Bernie campaign wasn't being ignored by corporate media during 2019, innuendos and mud often flew in his direction. But we ain't seen nothing yet.

    With so much at stake -- including the presidency and the top leadership of the Democratic Party -- no holds will be barred. For the forces of corporate greed and the military-industrial complex, it'll be all-out propaganda war on the Bernie campaign.

    While reasons for pessimism are abundant, so are ample reasons to understand that a Sanders presidency is a real possibility . The last places we should look for political realism are corporate media outlets that distort options and encourage passivity.

    Bernie is fond of quoting a statement from Nelson Mandela: "It always seems impossible until it is done."

    From the grassroots, as 2020 gets underway, the solution should be clear: All left hands on deck.


    Jan Goslinga • 38 minutes ago ,

    Elections aren't real. Democrats will nominate Joe Biden to lose the election. Trump will remain as fascist strongman and the dems will continue to blame his neoconservative policies on his white trash constituency.

    Bernie serves a few important functions.
    1. he keeps the radicals from leaving the plantation and going 3rd party.
    2. his promotion of progressive policies will make Biden less popular and help him lose to Trump
    3. Bernie and his "socialism" can then be blamed for losing the election to Trump

    Maxwell Jan Goslinga • 15 minutes ago ,

    Unfortunately this comment will be buried in this monstrosity of a thread- now at over 300 comments with only about a third of them having a much relevance.

    You might consider re-posting in reply to one of the foremost comments. Your simple realism will certainly not be well received during the campaign hallucinations.

    I've often wondered how it is people could believe the elections could have any positive and lasting impact on their lives if they have been through a couple of cycles. Do they not also wonder how it is that these election (marketing) campaigns now stretch out for well over a year nowadays demanding everyone's political attention, energy and resources. To say it is a colossal waste does not quite capture the enormity of the mind job being to people.

    Mensch59 Maxwell • 8 minutes ago • edited ,

    Your simple realism will certainly not be well received during the campaign hallucinations.

    Yeah, yeah, sure, sure. You "realists" who are true believers that you have the Truth and have a calling to preach the Truth absolutely must stand against the unwashed masses who claim that your "reality" isn't even intersubjectively verifiable, much less dialectical & material [eta & historical ].

    I quite enjoyed what SteelPirate/LaborSolidarity had to say about you attempting to gain a vanguard following by trolling lib-prog sites.

    Mensch59 Jan Goslinga • 21 minutes ago ,

    Elections aren't real.

    Never pay attention to anyone who claims what's "real" and what isn't. Politics certainly doesn't exist in the realm of an objective, concrete, physical, naturalistic, materialistic reality which is shared by a consensus of rational observers. At best, politics deals with intersubjectively verifiable social phenomena. Thus, politics is mostly idealistic in the belief that each mind generates its own reality.

    This realization is the topic of intersubjective verifiability, as recounted, for example, by Max Born (1949, 1965) Natural Philosophy of Cause and Chance , who points out that all knowledge, including natural or social science, is also subjective. p. 162: "Thus it dawned upon me that fundamentally everything is subjective, everything without exception. That was a shock."
    newestbeginning • 2 hours ago ,

    Meanwhile the wealth of the world's top 500 grew 25% in 2019...

    https://www.livemint.com/ne...

    V4V • 2 hours ago • edited ,

    Noam Chomsky on Bernie Sanders's Chances of Success- "...the chances he can be elected are pretty small." (Waiting with bated breath for copious downvotes by those who hate the truth and hate reality).

    https://cdn.embedly.com/widgets/media.html?src=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fembed%2FEpXJvWSa4FQ%3Ffeature%3Doembed&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DEpXJvWSa4FQ&image=https%3A%2F%2Fi.ytimg.com%2Fvi%2FEpXJvWSa4FQ%2Fhqdefault.jpg&key=21d07d84db7f4d66a55297735025d6d1&type=text%2Fhtml&schema=youtube

    PGGreen V4V • 2 hours ago • edited ,

    Most of who support Sanders know that his presidency will involve an uphill battle. Chomsky is being realistic.

    But there really is no better option for meaningful change working within the political system than supporting Sanders. it is also important to note that "Our Revolution" has energized many young activists, encouraging them to continue the fight. This goes beyond politics to social and economic issues. If Sanders leaves us with a movement, this may turn out to be more important than the presidency in the long run.

    Keep working for effective moral and economic justice and democracy!

    V4V PGGreen • an hour ago ,

    Well, I have said this several times, it's not the microscopic left that you need to convince, it's the majority of self-identifying Democrats not supporting Sanders that you need to convince. I am repelled by the Democratic Party, but there are millions who identify as Democrats and many are proud of it. You need to convince them, not us.

    PGGreen V4V • 21 minutes ago • edited ,

    Yes, although I don't think that those who support a Leftist agenda--whether you actually call them Leftists or not--are quite so microscopic a group as you imply. But you don't need to convince me or most others here (probably) that Sanders isn't perfect, or that it will be difficult for him to be elected president. We already know; we simply consider him the best option within this context of voting.

    Have you ever thought of turning your approach to systemic commentary (which is valid and interesting, BTW, I'm not discounting it) around and saying what candidates you support-- in this context being discussed of voting-- instead of which ones you don't? And then explaining why such support would be effective?

    I would say that what is wrong with the world is more a fault of the economic and political system than of Sanders alone--who not only plays small part in causing what is wrong, but a significant part in trying to correct it. Yes, he works within the system. That is a given. It may be, as Chris Hedges thinks, that there is no hope working within the system. But Noam Chomsky's approach also bears serious consideration that even Hedges doesn't discount. Voting will only be a small part of what brings about change, but it may make some slight difference--if you can stomach it. And it only takes a small amount of time.

    "In a system of immense power, small differences can translate into large outcomes."

    I don't see much of an argument that Sanders will be no better as president than Trump (and if you think so, I'd like to hear you argue it). I suspect you find the compromise unpalatable. I can understand that. I, too, draw the line at a certain point. I couldn't vote for HRC.

    Yes, Sanders isn't perfect. Chomsky also said another important thing: "We're all compromised." Everyone who is a citizen of the US is compromised, and bears some measure of responsibility for the military interventions undertaken by our government. Perhaps we should renounce our citizenship, refuse to pay taxes, etc. But most of us don't -- not even those of us committed to activist work in other ways -- significant ways -- to make things better.

    So what are those ways, for you?

    V4V PGGreen • 6 minutes ago ,

    But you don't need to convince me or most others here (probably) that Sanders isn't perfect

    -for me it isn' that he's not perfect, it's that I think he sucks

    "In a system of immense power, small differences can translate into large outcomes."

    -funny, that's a favorite line of Democrats

    I get that, but it doesn't negate that Sanders's chances are next to nil.

    Your suggestion of me signaling whom I support would fall on deaf ears around here. I have said this many times- I will probably for the Green Party candidate or the Socialist Equality Party candidate. If only a Democrat and Republican appear on the ballot then I would refuse to vote even if I had to pay a fine. I am not in the habit of telling anyone whom to vote for unless asked.

    Before a 3rd can succeed, the fantasy that the fix can come through the Democrats needs to be destroyed. Not to worry, in due time it will be obvious.

    Mensch59 PGGreen • 16 minutes ago ,

    My guess/bet is that V4V believes that the truth "We're all compromised" doesn't apply to him.
    He sees himself as a truth-knower and a truth-teller.
    He won't commit to logical argumentation.
    He'll preach the truth to you.

    Patrick_Walker V4V • 2 hours ago • edited ,

    I saw this video long ago--and agreed with it. But though Sanders' chances are small, they're still vastly larger than the NONEXISTENT chances of success of the purist, "Born to Lose" left. Why not just admit that you've totally given up and simply like to spent your time bitching and criticizing those of us with some (albeit small) hope?

    V4V Patrick_Walker • an hour ago • edited ,

    simply like to spent your time bitching and criticizing those of us with some (albeit small) hope?

    -straw man

    That isn't what I do because I couldn't care less whom Democrats support and vote for. Typically, I post some unpleasant truth about Sanders, like his lackluster polling numbers or his support for neoliberal warmongers and sit back and watch the ad hominems and downvotes roll in. I am not normally on the attack, I am usually on the receiving end.

    I admit that I see this forum as a form of entertainment. I admit I have zero expectation that someone to my liking will be elected president and that the system is going to change anytime soon. Do I believe it possible? Yes, I believe it is possible, I just don't believe it possible using the corrupt, Democratic Party as a vehicle and that's where we differ.

    And that the crux of our issue- you believe the Democratic Party can be used a vehicle to convert the CIA/Wall Street/War Inc. Democrats into the peoples' party, and I do not. If the needed changes are ever to arrive, it will be in spite of the Democrats not because of them. I hope you stick around because in due time I'll be telling you, "Told ya so."

    acme V4V • an hour ago ,

    The problem with your position is that, unlike Sanders, you don't seem to understand that a third candidate party candidate hasn't a snowball's chance in hell of being president unless if s/he somehow gets more electoral votes that both the major parties combined. If not, it goes to the house, and in the current partisan atmosphere, would be decided for the candidate of the House majority.
    The major parties have a death-grip on the presidency while the electoral college exists.

    V4V acme • an hour ago • edited ,

    You don't seem to understand that Sanders has a snowball's chance in hell of being the Democratic Party candidate for many reasons including the DNC arguing in court it is a private corporation and can legally rig primary and the trusty superdelegates for Biden.

    What I propose is a movement outside the Democratic Party in inside it. I believe any attempt to reform the Democratic Party is doomed to fail. All this whistling in the dark over Sanders is a distraction and a kicking the can down the road to the time you Democrats finally realize it isn't going to work. You obviously didn't learn it in 2016, and I would be surprised if you learn it once Sanders tanks and begins campaigning for Biden just like he did Clinton. I will promise this, I'll say, "I told ya so" in a matter of months. That's okay, play it again, Sam.

    Zsuzsi Kruska • 4 hours ago • edited ,

    People believe they need others to tell them what to do and give them the illusion somebody cares about them and has their best interests at heart. That's an archetype in the brain that goes back to our baby/childhood when we were dependent on our caregivers for sustenance, comfort and life itself.That's where the original concept of needing "leaders" comes from. But, what happens is psyco/sociopaths see this weakness in humanity and force their way to the top, to herd and exploit the gullible sheeple for their own agendas and selfish interests. No matter who rises to the top, she/he got their through the same system that's been going on since tribes had their chief; chief's lieutenant and witch doctor/shaman. Those three keep the tribe in line with their own desires. Chief through brute force, his lieutenant through information and witch doctor through religion and "spiritual" services; and all three require tribute and fees from the rest of the tribe. So, you will see, regardless of who the next POTUS will be, that same structure, although more complex today, will repeat itself. New boss/old boss, same ol' same ol'. All power has to be returned to the people at the local level before Wash. starts WWIII. But, if that happens, at least we won't have to worry about global warming with a nuclear winter after the bombs drop.


    trilobytegames • 3 days ago ,

    As usual, I find your analysis and commentary honest and accurate. However, I do take exception to your pulling out these canards:
    "Trump's contempt of Congress and attempt to get Volodymyr Zelensky, the Ukrainian president, to open an investigation of Joe Biden and his son, Hunter, in exchange for almost $400 million in U.S. military aid and allowing Zelensky to visit the White House are impeachable offenses"

    Trump has certain executive privileges and him being guilty of contempt of Congress should be up to the Supreme Court to decide. Jonathan Turley in his testimony made that quite clear. Military aid was never mentioned in the phone call. Zelensky was unaware aid would be withheld. So if Trump were using the money as a means to induce Zelensky to do those favors, it was a totally botched one. To quote Dr. Strangelove, "The whole point of the doomsday machine is lost...if you keep it a secret!"

    Nir Haramati • 3 days ago • edited ,

    New avenues for accountability and oversight became possible in Washington, D.C., in 2019, following the election of a new Democratic Party majority in the House (and the most diverse Congress ever) in the 2018 midterms. As a result, Democrats took hold of the subpoena power that rests in the House of Representatives, along with the power to set the agenda across congressional committees. As a result, 2019 has been full of important moments for congressional oversight of both the Trump administration and private business. Here are five of the most important moments in congressional oversight in 2019.

    1. Betsy DeVos, Are You "Too Corrupt" or "Too Incompetent"? ...
    2. Big Bank CEOs Are Stumped by Simple Budgets ...
    3. Wells Fargo Announces Plan to Divest From Private Prisons in Congressional Testimony ...
    4. Rep. Ilhan Omar vs. Elliott Abrams ...
    5. Voting to Impeach the President ...

    Congressional Oversight Claimed Important Victories in 2019. Here Are the Top 5

    The only people who lie and obfuscate facts as much as Trump and his GOP cult are neo progressive demagogues and propaganda buffs like Chris 'regime-change-in-America' Hedges.

    Kaptain Amerika • 3 days ago • edited ,

    Absolutely bush should have been impeached, convicted, removed and executed for war crimes and mass murder.

    But because he wasn't doesn't mean that our orange Fuhrer shouldn't be.
    He is the most dangerous authoritarian propagandist and threat to this country since Hitler.

    Dr Hacksaw Kaptain Amerika • 3 days ago • edited ,

    "[Trump] is the most dangerous authoritarian propagandist and threat to this country since Hitler."

    Correction, Kaptain: Since Obama.

    rosemariejackowski Dr Hacksaw • 3 days ago ,

    THE MOST DANGEROUS IN HISTORY....
    https://countercurrents.org...

    Kaptain Amerika Dr Hacksaw • 3 days ago ,

    NObama was a horrible POTUS for the 99% and is THE reason why we have trump, but he didn't poison every aspect of the government and everything else like your orange Fuhrer is doing, which is the exact same tactic that Hitler used to create Nazi Germany.

    Ron Ruggieri Dr Hacksaw • 3 days ago ,

    The generic Left is ignoring this aspect of the Trump impeachment circus . The whole farce IS political. Now Senator Lisa Murkowski wants her Republican Party to rise above politics ( and do the wrong thing ? ). In the past three years when did the Democrat Party ever rise above politics ? Politics USA is always CLASS politics, always IMPERIALIST , MILITARIST politics . All the " liberal " Democrats have been slobbering over the UN-ELECTED shadow government of the United States , the National Security Police State , slobbering over FBI, CIA bureaucrats , uniformed officials of the Pentagon War Crimes Machine . Join them ?

    This Senator Lisa Murkowski -no surprise - is in good standing with the Israel Lobby collectively determined to nullify the 2016 presidential election . NEWS clip :

    [ "There are about 6 million Jewish people living in America, so as a percentage it's quite small, but in terms of influence its quite big," Farage said. Farage seemed to question why Israel was not facing election-meddling accusations, saying Israeli groups "have a voice within American politics" but "I don't think anybody is suggesting that the Israeli government tried to affect the result of the American elections."]

    Did not the Kafkaesque Trump impeachment hearings look and sound like Old Yiddish Theater soap opera ? How many working class Christian Americans have heartfelt moral and cultural ties to the Ukraine of all places, now celebrating its first Jewish friend of Zionist Apartheid Israel president ? Who in the USA authorized this character to wage a proxy war against post-communist Russia ? WE THE PEOPLE ?
    Guess WHO is promoting the HATE RUSSIA, New McCarthyism ?

    VallejoD • 3 days ago ,

    $748 billion in 2020 for the military death machine equals $23 MILLION A SECOND.

    How many schools or hospitals could have been built, how many roads or bridges repaired, how many students educated with the money the MIC has squandered in the few seconds it has taken me to write this?

    We are destroying our people from the inside out. This is treason.

    [Jan 01, 2020] Individuals and groups evolved a bias to maximize fitness by maximizing power, which requires over-reproduction and/or over-consumption of natural resources (overshoot), whenever systemic constraints allow it. Differential power generation and accumulation result in a hierarchical group structure.

    Jan 01, 2020 | www.moonofalabama.org

    Tim E. , Dec 29 2019 4:45 utc | 59

    "I don't think there's any actual material reason that there should be any material wants anywhere on this planet, instead "only" political and managerial ones but that's because I believe (and I'm not an expert) one can add additional levels of safeguards -- both physical and administrative -- to existing or new nuclear power-plants and "burn" most of the byproducts into essentially new fuel thus buying humanity at least several thousands of years of time instead of for example chopping up large volumes of air and everything in it be it insects or birds.

    We should already be in a post-scarcity world, no -isms required, only kindness and applied knowledge. So to me that will be our death sentence if that is the final outcome; too little kindness (towards all life), too little application and sharing of knowledge.

    I don't know if that is inspiring or depressing or both :)"

    I always find those thoughts scary - since you and I are both NOT Farmers - and depend upon those little people to supply us with the foodstuffs we need to survive.

    It's GREAT to be a rocket scientist - but before a rocket scientist can exist - ya need Farmers.

    Jay Hanson and Richard Duncan said it best:

    http://www.dieoff.com/

    Here is a synopsis of the behavioral loop described above:

    Step 1. Individuals and groups evolved a bias to maximize fitness by maximizing power, which requires over-reproduction and/or over-consumption of natural resources (overshoot), whenever systemic constraints allow it. Differential power generation and accumulation result in a hierarchical group structure.

    Step 2. Energy is always limited, and overshoot eventually leads to decreasing power available to some members of the group, with lower-ranking members suffering first.

    Step 3. Diminishing power availability creates divisive subgroups within the original group. Low-rank members will form subgroups and coalitions to demand a greater share of power from higher-ranking individuals, who will resist by forming their own coalitions to maintain power.

    Step 4. Violent social strife eventually occurs among subgroups who demand a greater share of the remaining power.

    Step 5. The weakest subgroups (high or low rank) are either forced to disperse to a new territory, are killed, enslaved, or imprisoned.

    Step 6. Go back to step 1.

    The above loop was repeated countless thousands of times during the millions of years that we were evolving[9]. This behavior is inherent in the architecture of our minds -- is entrained in our biological material -- and will be repeated until we go extinct. Carrying capacity will decline[10] with each future iteration of the overshoot loop, and this will cause human numbers to decline until they reach levels not seen since the Pleistocene.

    Current models used to predict the end of the biosphere suggest that sometime between 0.5 billion to 1.5 billion years from now, land life as we know it will end on Earth due to the combination of CO2 starvation and increasing heat. It is this decisive end that biologists and planetary geologists have targeted for attention. However, all of their graphs reveal an equally disturbing finding: that global productivity will plummet from our time onward, and indeed, it already has been doing so for the last 300 million years.[11]

    It's impossible to know the details of how our rush to extinction will play itself out, but we do know that it is going to be hell for those who are unlucky to be alive at the time.

    And:

    The Olduvai theory is defined by the ratio of world energy production and population. It states that the life expectancy of Industrial Civilization is less than or equal to 100 years: 1930-2030. After more than a century of strong growth -- energy production per capita peaked in 1979. The Olduvai theory explains the 1979 peak and the subsequent decline. Moreover, it says that energy production per capita will fall to its 1930 value by 2030, thus giving Industrial Civilization a lifetime of less than or equal to 100 years. This analysis predicts that the collapse will be strongly correlated with an 'epidemic' of permanent blackouts of high-voltage electric power networks -- worldwide.

    http://dieoff.com/page234.pdf


    Will Humans reach the Stars? I believe NOT - and that extinction is but a heart beat away. We are not a Peaceful species - amongst many others - but the Universe lives in Harmony.

    See: https://etheric.com/om-the-cosmic-vibration/

    and:

    https://etheric.com/continuous-creation-cosmology/

    [Jan 01, 2020] Worst Market In 30 Years - 400,000 Commodity Railcars Sit Idle Amid Industrial Recession

    Jan 01, 2020 | www.zerohedge.com

    Wells Fargo, Citigroup, PNC Financial Service Group, and CIT Group accumulated hundreds of thousands of commodity hauling railcars in North America over the last decade. These banks believed railcars carrying coal, grain, and other commodities were going to be highly profitable but have recently turned out to be a major headache as many cars are now in storage because of new regulations and demand woes brought on by fluctuating commodity markets.

    David Nahass, president of Railroad Financial Corp., which provides advisory services to railroad firms, told The Wall Street Journa l that "the industry is suffering, there are no two ways about it. Lease rates are down, and there's not a source of hope about when it will start to improve."

    The Journal, citing the Association of American Railroads (AAR), said about 400,000 railcars currently sit in storage with no use at all, and many are bank-owned.


    woodknot , 13 seconds ago link

    Lost the pipeline war, eat your rail cars Buffett.

    Juggernaut x2 , 1 minute ago link

    Overproduction due to ultra-low rates - another way 10 years of the Fed's ZIRP has distorted the Business Cycle

    BEMUSED-CONFUSED , 4 minutes ago link

    Clean the railroad cars out

    turn them into homeless centers.

    Like in the movie:

    Boxcar Bertha.

    bshirley1968 , 6 minutes ago link

    "The railroad crisis has hit certain types of railcars the hardest. For instance, coal shipments have plunged since 2011, which diminished the demand for coal hopper cars."

    I thought Trump was going to save the coal industry. He carried his largest wins in WV and WY. Somebody's not happy.

    [Jan 01, 2020] Gig workers getting screwed

    Jan 01, 2020 | www.moonofalabama.org

    c1ue , Dec 29 2019 16:19 utc | 3

    Gig workers getting screwed. Those who don't learn from history are doomed to repeat it - the modern gig economy is nothing more than the "putting out" system redux from the early days of the industrial revolution.
    And much like the looms and thread from the putting out system, the owners control pricing for gig workers as well as cut off any possibility of upward advancement.
    Vice article on gig workers
    Note this isn't one company - it is all of them. When Uber first started, they were paying over $1/mile for drivers - it is now down to $0.60. Equally, the various other gig startups pay more to lure workers in, then cut when they need/want to.
    When she initially joined Instacart a year ago, Dorton says she could earn up to $800 during a 40 hour workweek picking up groceries at Costco and Sam's Club and dropping them off at customers' homes. But in recent months, her weekly income has fallen to $400 for 60 hours of grocery shopping. "I made more delivering pizza and waiting tables," Dorton told Motherboard.

    Yes, but with the delivery services contributing to the everlasting restaurant crunch, there are fewer jobs delivering pizza and waiting tables. That's a feature.

    [Jan 01, 2020] 'Predatory capitalism' is disproportionately Jewish.

    Jan 01, 2020 | www.unz.com

    Amerimutt Golems says: December 19, 2019 at 1:04 pm GMT 200 Words @Lot

    The article bounces back and forth between two completely different fields: private equity and distressed debt funds. The latter is completely defensible. A lot of bondholders, probably the majority, cannot hold distressed or defaulted debt. Insurance companies often can't by law. Bond mutual funds set out in their prospectuses they don't invest in anything rated lower than A, AA, or whatever. Even those allowed to hold distressed debt don't want the extra costs involved with doing so, such as carefully following bankruptcy proceedings and dealing with delayed and irregular payments.

    The author is not a finance expert but he correctly spotlights flaws of so-called 'predatory capitalism' which is disproportionately Jewish.

    Private equity is rife with vices like asset-stripping and looting e.g Eddie Lampert ('Jewishness' member) plus El Trumpo appointee Steven Mnuchin at Sears.

    Vulture funds often load all sorts of costs, even frivolous ones, and extra interest charges on the original debt to maximize profit.

    Some countries have the Duplum rule which limits the amount you are liable to a creditor when you default on a debt.

    Sears accuses Eddie Lampert of looting the company
    https://nypost.com/2019/04/18/sears-accuses-eddie-lampert-of-looting-the-company/

    [Jan 01, 2020] When the vote finally took place a few days ago, a conclusive 69.5% of Samsung shareholders voted in favor of the Lee proposal, leaving Elliott licking its wounds and complaining about the "patriotic marketing" of those behind the merger.

    Jan 01, 2020 | www.unz.com

    Robjil , says: December 19, 2019 at 6:56 pm GMT

    @Robjil ssociates, was overwhelmingly effective. Before a crucial shareholder vote on the Lee's planned merger, Samsung Securities CEO Yoon Yong-am said:

    "We should score a victory by a big margin in the first battle, in order to take the upper hand in a looming war against Elliott, and keep other speculative hedge funds from taking short-term gains in the domestic market."

    When the vote finally took place a few days ago, a conclusive 69.5% of Samsung shareholders voted in favor of the Lee proposal, leaving Elliott licking its wounds and complaining about the "patriotic marketing" of those behind the merger.

    [Jan 01, 2020] Karl Marx analysis of vulture behaviour of Jewish financiers remains pretty sound

    Jan 01, 2020 | www.unz.com

    secondElijah , says: Website December 19, 2019 at 1:10 pm GMT

    @J Adelman perpetual victim .everyone hates me without a reason. My sin is greater than I can bear (Cain) everyone who comes across me will kill me. I spend my time wandering the earth (boo ho). And despite slaying your brother you are accorded divine protection.

    Jesus said (paraphrasing here) that if the unclean spirit is cast out of a man and is not replaced with something wholesome he takes "seven other spirits" into himself and becomes totally insane. You did this to yourself and you will realize that your problem is no longer with man but with God himself. Jacob the deceiver has wrestled all his life against his fellow man and triumphed but now he will confront God himself. Get ready to meet your Maker and see how far your excuses will get you with the Almighty.

    J.W. , says: December 19, 2019 at 1:39 pm GMT
    @J Adelman nder. Jewish business behavior has a retarding effect on societies. It's prominent, large, rapacious and extremely selfish.

    As long as Jews made their money then fuck everybody else.

    Yes, it's unfair when innocent Jews suffer. When the actions of other members of it's DNA choose schemes and dishonorable ways to make money it's going to happen.

    Stop acting like innocent victims all the time. This narcissistic stance might explain why Jews are hated seemingly everywhere. Relationships with narcissists are no fun and the means necessary to break free are often hurtful and unfortunate for everyone involved.

    Hapalong Cassidy , says: December 19, 2019 at 1:44 pm GMT

    No mention of Mitt Romney's vulture fund Bain Capital? The one that destroyed Toys R Us, among others?

    BannedHipster , says: Website December 19, 2019 at 2:21 pm GMT

    It's a simple ingroup/outgroup distinction.

    Jews see themselves as the ingroup, and the "goyim" as the outgroup. Since Whites are the "outgroup" it's not just acceptable, but praiseworthy, to exploit them. To "beat" them at war.

    The problem is that Whites wrongly do not see Jews as an outgroup – something that Jews themselves take great pains to discourage via their various front groups like the ADL.

    There is no "technical" fix, there is no objective "system" that can change this dynamic. There is no "level playing field."

    Whites need to ostracize Jews at all levels. Boycott, Divest and Sanction – not just their apartheid regime of Jew bigotry in Zionist-occupied Palestine, but at every level of society, business, civil institutions, etc.

    Realist , says: December 19, 2019 at 2:22 pm GMT
    @Ghali

    Jews are destroying the world. Everywhere they go, they leave behind nations in ruins. Look at Europe, Africa and the Americas, Jews have left their ugly footprints. Corruption, prostitution, drugs and human trafficking are their trade.

    Greed from all races is the problem.

    BannedHipster , says: Website December 19, 2019 at 2:31 pm GMT
    @Just passing through obs time and time again throughout their history, to the point bishops and priests would harbor Jews in the cathedrals and lock the doors before the peasants could arrest them.

    Indeed, the infighting among Whites promoted by the likes of Jones is yet again another assist from Catholic powers to their partners, the Jews.

    The popular "neo-reactionary/NRx" movement, started by the Ashkenazi Curtis Yarvin, is yet another "right-wing" fad that blames Calvinists for all the problems in the world. Jews are blameless, yet again another White ethnicity/religion is at fault.

    No wonder Jews get away with what they do. Whites are too busy infighting over false history demonizing various rival cults.

    Really No Shit , says: December 19, 2019 at 2:35 pm GMT

    So, the "vultures" flew out to the West after devouring the Russian empire and now with the help of the likes of the homeboy or more like a two bit whore, Ben Sasse, they've descended on America and have started gutting it out.

    Where will they fly next? White Christians don't want them and black/brown Muslims can't stand them but perhaps China is their next destination being that they have shipped most of the jobs out there and the whole lot of them are marrying "Chinese-American" women in droves for good measure.

    In the coming battle of the titans, the one who's name can't be pronounced, viz. Yahweh, hopefully has better guns than Jehovah and Allah, for it sure is gonna need it when the latter two gang up on