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lzip

Lzip - LZMA lossless data compressor

Lzip is a lossless data compressor with a user interface similar to the one of gzip or bzip2. Lzip is about as fast as gzip, compresses most files more than bzip2, and is better than both from a data recovery perspective. Lzip is a clean implementation of the LZMA "algorithm".

The lzip file format is designed for data sharing and long-term archiving, taking into account both data integrity and decoder availability:

A nice feature of the lzip format is that a corrupt byte is easier to repair the nearer it is from the beginning of the file. Therefore, with the help of lziprecover, losing an entire archive just because of a corrupt byte near the beginning is a thing of the past.

Lzip uses the same well-defined exit status values used by bzip2, which makes it safer than compressors returning ambiguous warning values (like gzip) when it is used as a back end for other programs like tar or zutils.

In this lzip benchmark page you can find some tests showing how well lzip can replace gzip and bzip2 as general purpose compressor for unix-like systems.

Other features

Lzip will automatically use the smallest possible dictionary size for each file without exceeding the given limit. Keep in mind that the decompression memory requirement is affected at compression time by the choice of dictionary size limit.

When compressing, lzip replaces every file given in the command line with a compressed version of itself, with the name "original_name.lz".

(De)compressing a file is much like copying or moving it; therefore lzip preserves the access and modification dates, permissions, and, when possible, ownership of the file just as "cp -p" does. (If the user ID or the group ID can't be duplicated, the file permission bits S_ISUID and S_ISGID are cleared).

Lzip is able to read from some types of non regular files if the "--stdout" option is specified.

If no file names are specified, lzip compresses (or decompresses) from standard input to standard output. In this case, lzip will decline to write compressed output to a terminal, as this would be entirely incomprehensible and therefore pointless.

Lzip will correctly decompress a file which is the concatenation of two or more compressed files. The result is the concatenation of the corresponding uncompressed files. Integrity testing of concatenated compressed files is also supported.

Lzip can produce multi-member files and safely recover, with lziprecover, the undamaged members in case of file damage. Lzip can also split the compressed output in volumes of a given size, even when reading from standard input. This allows the direct creation of multivolume compressed tar archives.

Lzip is able to compress and decompress streams of unlimited size by automatically creating multi-member output. The members so created are large, about 64 PiB each.

There is no such thing as a "LZMA algorithm"; it is more like a "LZMA coding scheme". For example, the option '-0' of lzip uses the scheme in almost the simplest way possible; issuing the longest match it can find, or a literal byte if it can't find a match. Inversely, a much more elaborated way of finding coding sequences of minimum price than the one currently used by lzip could be developed, and the resulting sequence could also be coded using the LZMA coding scheme.

Lzip currently implements two variants of the LZMA algorithm; fast (used by option -0) and normal (used by all other compression levels).

The high compression of LZMA comes from combining two basic, well-proven compression ideas: sliding dictionaries (LZ77/78) and markov models (the thing used by every compression algorithm that uses a range encoder or similar order-0 entropy coder as its last stage) with segregation of contexts according to what the bits are used for.

The ideas embodied in lzip are due to (at least) the following people: Abraham Lempel and Jacob Ziv (for the LZ algorithm), Andrey Markov (for the definition of Markov chains), G.N.N. Martin (for the definition of range encoding), Igor Pavlov (for putting all the above together in LZMA), and Julian Seward (for bzip2's CLI).

Related projects

Documentation

The manual is available in the info system of the GNU Operating System. Use info to access the top level info page. Use info lzip to access the lzip section directly.

An online manual for lzip can be found here.

Download

The latest released version of lzip can be found here. You may also subscribe to lzip-bug and receive an email every time a new version is released.

Jonatan Yong kindly provided a Windows32 port of lzip that can also be downloaded from the Savannah download link just above.

How to get help

For general discussion of bugs in lzip the mailing list lzip-bug@nongnu.org is the most appropriate forum. Please send messages as plain text. Please do not send messages encoded as HTML nor encoded as base64 MIME nor included as multiple formats. Please include a descriptive subject line. If all of the subject are "bug in lzip" it is impossible to differentiate them.

An archive of the bug report mailing list is available at http://lists.gnu.org/mailman/listinfo/lzip-bug.

How to help

To contact the author, either to report a bug or to contribute fixes or improvements, send mail to lzip-bug@nongnu.org. Please send messages as plain text. If posting patches they should be in unified diff format against the latest version. They should include a text description.

See also the lzip project page at Savannah.

Links

Atool, Patool - Command line archive managers that understand lzip files.

GNU Automake - A Makefile generator able to create lzip-compressed tarballs.

Documentation as an indicator of code quality - A different review of lzip.

Dragora GNU/Linux - A GNU/Linux distribution using lzip in its package system.

Easylzma - C library and tools for lzip and lzma-alone file formats.

File Roller - An archive manager for GNOME that understands lzip files.

Lesspipe.sh - View the contents of lzipped files with the pager less.

Littleutils - Convert your files to lzip format.

Man-db - An implementation of the Unix man command able to read lzipped pages.

GNU Midnight Commander - A visual file manager that understands lzip files.

RPM - RPM Package Manager that uses lzip to compress packages.

GNU Tar, Star - Automatically create and extract lzip-compressed tar archives.

GNU Texinfo - The GNU Documentation System understands lzip-compressed manuals.

Z - A simple, safe and convenient front-end for lzip, bzip2 and gzip.

Download lzip for AIX, ALT Linux, Amiga, Arch Linux, Debian, Exherbo, Fedora, FreeBSD, Gentoo, HP-UX, Mac (fink), Mac (softpedia), NetBSD, NixOS, OS/2, Slackware, Solaris (OpenCSW), Ubuntu, Windows (Cygwin).

Licensing

Lzip is free software: you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by the Free Software Foundation, either version 2 of the License, or (at your option) any later version.

Lzip - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

7-Zip was released in 2000; a tool employing LZMA first became available on Unix-like operating systems in 2004 when a port of the command line version of 7-Zip (p7zip) was released. In the same year, the LZMA SDK became available, which included the program called “lzma_alone”; less than a year later, Lasse Collin released LZMA Utils, which at first only consisted of a set of wrapper scripts implementing a gzip-like interface to lzma_alone. In 2008, Antonio Diaz Diaz released lzip, which uses a proper container format with checksums and magic numbers instead of the raw LZMA data stream, providing a complete Unix-style solution for using LZMA. Nevertheless, LZMA Utils was extended to have similar features and then renamed to XZ Utils.[3]

xz - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

xz is a lossless data compression program and file format which incorporates the LZMA compression algorithm.

One can think of xz as a stripped-down version of the 7-Zip program. xz has its own file format rather than the .7z format used by 7-Zip (which lacks support for Unix-like file system metadata[2]).


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