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Enterprise Linux sickness with overcomplexity:
slightly skeptical view on enterprise Linux distributions

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Slightly Skeptical View on Enterprise Unix Administration

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Introduction

Image a language in which both grammar and vocabulary is changing each three to five years.  And both are so huge that are beyond any normal human comprehension. You can learn some subset of both vocabulary and grammar when you closely work with a particular subsystem for several months in a row, only to forget it after a couple of months or quarters.  The classic example here is RHEL kickstart. 

In a sense all talks about linux security is a joke as you can't secure the OS, which is far, far beyond your ability to comprehend. So state-sponsored hackers will always have an edge in breaking into linux.

Linux became two complex to master for a single person. Now this is yet another monstrous OS, that nobody know well (as the level completely puts it far above mere mortal capabilities)   And that's the problem. Both Red Hat and Suse are now software development companies that can be called "overcomplexity junks". And it shows in their recent products.  Actually SLES is even worse then RHEL in this respect, despite being (originally) a German distribution. 

Generally in Linux administration (like previously in enterprise Unix administration) you get what you paid for. Nothing can replace multi-year experience, and experience often is acquired by making expensive mistakes (see Admin Horror Stories). Vendor training is expensive and is more or less available only to sysadmin in few industries (financial industry is one). For Red Hat we have the situation that closely resembles the situation well know from Solaris: training is rather good, but prices are exorbitant.

Due to the current complexity (or, more correctly, overcomplexity) of Linux environments most sysadmins can master it well only for commonly used subsystems and for just one flavor of Linux. Better one might be able to  support two (with highly asymmetrical level of skills, being usually considerably more proficient in one flavor over the other). In other words Unix wars are now replaced on Linux turf with vengeance.

The level of mental overload and frustration from the overcomplexity of two major enterprise Linux flavors (RHEL and SLES) is such that people are ready for a change. Note that in OS ecosystem there is a natural tendency toward monopoly -- nothing succeed like success and the critical mass of installation that those two "monstrously complex" Linux distribution hold prevent any escape. Especially in enterprise environment.  Red Hat can essentially dictate what linux should be -- as it did with incorporating systemd in RHEL 7. 

Still there is a large difference between RHEL and SLES popularity: 

Ubuntu -- a dumped-down Linux based on Debian, with some strange design decisions -- is now getting some corporate sales, especially in cloud environment,  the expense of Suse. It still mainly desktop OS but it gradually acquires some enterprise share two.  That makes the number of enterprise linux distribution close to what we used to have in commercial Unix space (Solaris, AIX and HP-UX) and Debian and Ubuntu playing  the role of Solaris.   

Troubles with SElinux

SLES until recently was slightly simpler then RHEL, as it did not include horribly complex security subsystem that RHEL uses -- SELinux.  It takes a lot of efforts to learn even basics of SELinux and configure properly one facing Internet server. Most sysadmin just use it blindly iether enabling it and disabling it without understanding any details of its functioning (or, more correctly, understanding it on the level allowing them to use common protocols, much like is the case with firewalls)

Actually it has a better solution in Linux-space used in SLES (AppArmor). Which was pretty elegant solution to a complex problem, if you ask me. But the critical mass of installation and m,arket share secured by Red Hat, made it "king of the hill" and prevented AppArmor from becoming Linux standard. A the result SUSE was forced to incorporate SELinux.

SELinux provides a Mandatory Access Control (MAC) system built into the Linux kernel (that is staff that labels things as "super secret", "secret" and "confidential" that three letter agencies are using to guard information). Historically Security Enhanced Linux (SELinux) was an open source project sponsored by the National Security Agency. Despite the user-friendly GUI, SELinux is difficult to configure and hard to understand. The documentation does not help much either. Most administrators are just turning SELinux subsystem off during the initial install but for Internet facing server you need to configure and use it, or...   And sometimes effects can be really subtle: for example you can login as root using password authentication but can't using passwordless ssh certificate.  That's why many complex applications, especially in HPC area explicidly recommend disabling SElinux as a starting point of installation. You can find articles on the WEB devoted to this topic. See for example

SELinux produces some very interesting errors, see for example http://bugs.mysql.com/bug.php?id=12676 and is not very compatible with some subsystems and complex applications.  Especially telling is the comment to the this blog post How to disable SELinux in RHEL 5:

Aeon said... @ May 13, 2008 2:34 PM
 
Thanks a million! I was dealing with a samba refusing to access the server shared folders. After about 2 hours of scrolling forums I found out the issue may be this shitty thing samba_selinux.

I usually disable it when I install, but this time I had to use the Dell utilities (no choice at all) and they enabled the thing. Disabled it your way, rebooted and it works as I wanted it. Thanks again!

SLES has one significant defect: by default it does not assign each user a unique group like RHEL does. But this can be fixed with a special wrapper for useradd command. In simplest for it can be just:

   #wrapper for useradd command
   # accepts two arguments: UID and user name, for example
   # uadd 3333 joedoers

   function uadd
   {
   groupadd -g $1 $2
   useradd -u $1 -g $1 -m $2
   }

Working closely with commercial Linuxes and seeing all their warts and such, one instantly understand that the traditional Open Source (GPL-based Open Source), is a very problematic business model. Historically (especially in case of Red Hat) is was used as a smoke screen for the VCs to get software engineers to work for free, not even for minimum wage, but for free! And grab as much money from suckers as they can, using all right words as an anesthetic. Essentially they take their hard work, pump $$$ in marketing and either sell the resulting company to one of their other portfolio companies or take it public and dump the shares on the public. Meanwhile the software engineers that worked to develop that software for free, aka slave labor, get $0.00 for their hard work while the VCs top brass of the startup and investment bankers make a killing.

And of course then they get their buddies in mainstream media hype the GPL-based Open Source development as the best thing after sliced bread.

Licensing

RHEL licensing is a mess too. In addition two higher level licenses are expensive and make Microsoft server license look very competitive.  Recently they went "IBM way" and started to change different prices for 4 socket servers: you can't just use two 2 socket licenses to license 4 socket server with their new registration-manager.  The next step will be classic IBM per core licensing; that's why so many people passionately hate IBM.

 There are three different types of licensing (let's call them patch-only, regular and with premium support). Each has several variations (for example HPC computational node is a variant of "patches only" license but does not provide GUI and many packages in repository). The level of tech support with the latter two (which are truly enterprise licenses) is very similar -- similarly dismal -- especially for complex problems, unless you press them really hard. 

In addition Red Hat people screwed their portal so much that you can't tell which server is assigned to what license. that situation improved with registration manger but new problem arise.

Generally the level of screw up of RHEL user portal is such, that there doubts that they can do anything useful in Linux space in the future, other then try to hold to their market share.

All is all while RHEL 6 is very complex but still a usable enterprise Linux distribution because if did not radically changed from RHEL 4, and 5. But it is not fan to use it, anymore. It's a pain. It's a headache. The same is true for SLES.

For RHEL 7 more strong words are applicable. 


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[May 08, 2021] LFCA- Learn User Account Management Part 5

May 08, 2021 | www.tecmint.com

The /etc/gshadow File

This file contains encrypted or ' shadowed ' passwords for group accounts and, for security reasons, cannot be accessed by regular users. It's only readable by the root user and users with sudo privileges.

$ sudo cat /etc/gshadow

tecmint:!::

From the far left, the file contains the following fields:

[Mar 30, 2021] CloudLinux Launches AlmaLinux, CentOS Linux clone

It is out. now the question is "Will it survive?"
Mar 30, 2021 | www.zdnet.com

... Now, under a new name, AlmaLinux OS is here with its first release.

The company also announced the formation of a non-profit organization: AlmaLinux Open Source Foundation . This group will take over managing the AlmaLinux project going forward. CloudLinux has committed a $1 million annual endowment to support the project.

Jack Aboutboul, former Red Hat and Fedora engineer and architect, will be AlmaLinux's community manager. Altogether, Aboutboul brings over 20 years of experience in open-source communities as a participant, manager, and evangelist.

He'll be helped by the AlmaLinux governing board. Currently, this includes Jesse Asklund, global head of customer experience for WebPros at cPanel ; Simon Phipps, open-source advocate and a former president of the Open Source Initiative (OSI) ; Igor Seletskiy, CloudLinux CEO; and Eugene Zamriy, CloudLinux director of release engineering at. Two additional members of the governing board for the 501(c)(6) non-profit organization will be selected by the AlmaLinux community.

"In an effort to fill the void soon to be left by the demise of CentOS as a stable release, AlmaLinux has been developed in close collaboration with the Linux community," said Aboutaboul in a statement. "These efforts resulted in a production-ready alternative to CentOS that is supported by community members."

... ... ...

Since its original CentOS announcements, Red Hat has announced free RHEL releases for small production workloads and development teams and open-source, non-profit groups . That, however, doesn't answer the needs of businesses, which were using CentOS and relying on their own in-house support teams rather than Red Hat's support.

This first release of AlmaLinux is a one-to-one binary compatible fork of RHEL 8.3. Looking ahead, AlmaLinux will seek to keep step-in-step with future RHEL releases. RHEL 8.x, CentOS 8.x, and Oracle Linux 8.x migration instructions are available today.

The GitHub page has already been published and the completed source code has been published in the main download repository . The CloudLinux engineering team has also published FAQ on AlmaLinux Wiki .

[Mar 15, 2021] CentOS - RHEL 7 - How to Install GUI The Geek Diary

Mar 15, 2021 | www.thegeekdiary.com

Installing the environment group "Server with GUI"

1. Check the available environment groups :

# yum grouplist
Loaded plugins: langpacks, product-id, search-disabled-repos, subscription-manager
This system is not registered to Red Hat Subscription Management. You can use subscription-manager to register.
There is no installed groups file.
Maybe run: yum groups mark convert (see man yum)
Available Environment Groups:
   Minimal Install
   Infrastructure Server
   File and Print Server
   Basic Web Server
   Virtualization Host
   Server with GUI
Available Groups:
   Compatibility Libraries
   Console Internet Tools
   Development Tools
   Graphical Administration Tools
   Legacy UNIX Compatibility
   Scientific Support
   Security Tools
   Smart Card Support
   System Administration Tools
   System Management
Done

2. Execute the following to install the environments for GUI.

# yum groupinstall "Server with GUI"
.......
Transaction Summary
====================================================
Install  199 Packages (+464 Dependent packages)
Upgrade               (   8 Dependent packages)

Total download size: 523 M
Is this ok [y/d/N]:

The above will install the GUI in RHEL 7, which by default get installed to text mode.

3. Enable GUI on system start up. In RHEL 7, systemd uses 'targets' instead of runlevels. The file /etc/inittab is no more used to change run levels. Issue the following command to enable the GUI on system start.

To set a default target :

# systemctl set-default graphical.target

To change the current target to graphical without reboot :

# systemctl start graphical.target

Verify the default target :

# systemctl get-default
graphical.target

4. Reboot the machine to verify that it boots into GUI directly.

# systemctl reboot
Installing core GNOME packages

"Server with GUI" installs the default GUI which is GNOME. In case if you want to install only core GNOME packages use :

# yum groupinstall 'X Window System' 'GNOME'
....
Transaction Summary
===========================================================
Install  104 Packages (+427 Dependent packages)
Upgrade               (   8 Dependent packages)

Total download size: 318 M
Is this ok [y/d/N]:


[Mar 15, 2021] Install-Convert A Minimal Installation Into GUI on CentOS-RHEL 6-7

Mar 15, 2021 | kapendra.com

Step 1: Install Gnome GUI

Run the following command to install GUI

For CentOS 7:

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# yum group install "GNOME Desktop" "Graphical Administration Tools"
For RHEL 7:
# yum groupinstall "Server with GUI"
... ... ... Step 2: Make GUI Default Mode For Every Reboot

With the upgrade of Centos/RHEL 7 from CentOS/RHEL 6 concept of runlevel has been changed to systemd so run following command

For RHEL/CentOS 7:
ln -sf /lib/systemd/system/runlevel5.target /etc/systemd/system/default.targ

... ... ...

Step 3: Reboot the Server
# reboot
Few Short Cut Commands

GUI to CLI : Ctrl + Alt + F6
CLI to GUI : Ctrl + Alt + F1


Kapendra http://kapendra.com Love to write technical stuff with personal experience as I am working as a Sr. Linux Admin. and every day is a learning day and Trust me being tech geek is really cool.

[Mar 01, 2021] Monitoring failed login attempts on Linux - Network World

Mar 01, 2021 | www.networkworld.com

Monitoring failed login attempts on Linux Failed logins can be legitimate human error or attempts to hack your Linux system, but either way they might flag something that warrants attention.

me title=

A password login screen overlaid against an abstract background of data and network connections.
Vladimir Kazakov / Getty Images

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Repeated failed login attempts on a Linux server can indicate that someone is trying to break into an account or might only mean that someone forgot their password or is mistyping it. In this post, we look at how you can check for failed login attempts and check your system's settings to see when accounts will be locked to deal with the problem.

One of the first things you need to know is how to check if logins are failing. The command below looks for indications of failed logins in the /var/log/auth.log file used on Ubuntu and related systems. When someone tries logging in with a wrong or misspelled password, failed logins will show up as in the lines below:

$ sudo grep "Failed password" /var/log/auth.log | head -3
Nov 17 15:08:39 localhost sshd[621893]: Failed password for nemo from 192.168.0.7 port 8132 ssh2
Nov 17 15:09:13 localhost sshd[621893]: Failed password for nemo from 192.168.0.7 port 8132 ssh2

You could summarize instances of failed logins by account with a command like this:

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$ sudo grep "Failed password" /var/log/auth.log | grep -v COMMAND | awk '{print $9}' | sort | uniq -c
     22 nemo
      1 shs
      2 times:

That command summarizes failed logins by username (ninth column in the grep output). It avoids looking at lines containing the word "COMMAND" to skip over inquiries that contain the "Failed passwords" phrase (e.g., someone running the command that was run above). The "times:" string suggests that there were more repeated attempts than the number reported. These come from lines containing "message repeated 5 times:" that may be added to the log file when a password is entered incorrectly a number of times in quick succession.

https://imasdk.googleapis.com/js/core/bridge3.444.1_en.html#goog_2129280102

Another thing you might want to check is where the failed login attempts are coming from. For that, change the field that you're focusing on from the ninth to the eleventh as in this example:

$ sudo grep "Failed password" /var/log/auth.log | grep -v COMMAND | awk '{print $11}' | sort | uniq -c
     23 192.168.0.7

It might be especially suspicious, for example, if you're seeing failed logins for multiple users from a single system.

In RHEL, Centos and related systems, you'll find the messages related to failed logins in the /var/log/secure file. You can use basically the same query as shown above to get a count. Just change the file name as shown here:

$ sudo grep "Failed password" /var/log/secure | awk '{print $9}' | sort | uniq -c
      6 nemo

Check settings in the /etc/pam.d/password-auth and /etc/pam.d/system-auth files. Adding lines like these will enforce your settings.

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The retail environment has experienced far-reaching changes over the past year. With the pandemic fundamentally shifting how customers interact with retailers, digital sales had to evolve at warp... Checking faillog

You might check out the faillog command, but this command looks at the /var/log/faillog file which does not seem to be used on many systems these days. If you use the faillog -a command and get output like that shown below listing 12/31/69 as in the time columns, it's clear this file is not in use.

$ faillog -a
Login       Failures Maximum Latest                   On

root            0        0   12/31/69 19:00:00 -0500
daemon          0        0   12/31/69 19:00:00 -0500
bin             0        0   12/31/69 19:00:00 -0500
sys             0        0   12/31/69 19:00:00 -0500

The dates and times shown refer back to the beginning of Unix (01/01/70)--probably corrected for the local time zone. If you run the commands shown below, you can verify that the file is not empty, but contains no real data:

$ ls -l /var/log/faillog
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 32576 Nov 12 12:12 /var/log/faillog
$ od -bc /var/log/faillog
0000000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000
         \0  \0  \0  \0  \0  \0  \0  \0  \0  \0  \0  \0  \0  \0  \0  \0
*
0077500

If the faillog file is actually in use, you should see recent activity and no references to 1969.

How to respond

Failed logins can happen for many reasons. It may be that one of your users tried to log in with their caps-lock key on and didn't notice. Maybe they recently changed their password and forgot that they did so and were trying the old one. Maybe they're trying the password they use on a different system. If one particular account frequently shows up when you run your queries, you might look into it. However, an occasional failed login attempt is fairly common.

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To see how your system is set up to deal with failed logins, check out the /etc/pam.d/common-auth file . It's used on systems with the Linux Pluggable Authentication Modules (PAM). Two settings in this file control how many failed login attempts will be tolerated before an account is temporarily locked and how long the account will be locked.

A line like this one will have PAM locking an account after six failed login attempts. The lockout will last for five minutes (300 seconds).

auth  required   pam_tally2.so deny=6 unlock_time=300
Wrap-Up

Occasional failed logins are to be expected, but it's still a good idea to be familiar with how your system is configured and run a query from time to time to get a handle on how much of this kind of activity is taking place. One good way to do this is to run the query as a cron job and email the output to yourself.

[Mar 01, 2021] Serious 10-year-old flaw in Linux sudo command; a new version patches it

Mar 01, 2021 | www.networkworld.com

Linux users should immediately patch a serious vulnerability to the sudo command that, if exploited, can allow unprivileged users gain root privileges on the host machine.

Called Baron Samedit, the flaw has been "hiding in plain sight" for about 10 years, and was discovered earlier this month by researchers at Qualys and reported to sudo developers, who came up with patches Jan. 19, according to a Qualys blog . (The blog includes a video of the flaw being exploited.)

[Get regularly scheduled insights by signing up for Network World newsletters.]

A new version of sudo -- sudo v1.9.5p2 -- has been created to patch the problem, and notifications have been posted for many Linux distros including Debian, Fedora, Gentoo, Ubuntu, and SUSE, according to Qualys.

According to the common vulnerabilities and exposures (CVE) description of Baron Samedit ( CVE-2021-3156 ), the flaw can be exploited "via 'sudoedit -s' and a command-line argument that ends with a single backslash character."

https://imasdk.googleapis.com/js/core/bridge3.444.1_en.html#goog_1515248305

According to Qualys, the flaw was introduced in July 2011 and affects legacy versions from 1.8.2 to 1.8.31p2 as well as default configurations of versions from 1.9.0 to 1.9.5p1.

[Feb 05, 2021] The Unofficial Way To Migrate To AlmaLinux From CentOS 8 - OSTechNix

Feb 05, 2021 | ostechnix.com

The Unofficial Way To Migrate To AlmaLinux From CentOS 8 Written by Sk February 3, 2021 1053 Views 1 comment 3

AlmaLinux beta is already out! You can read the details in our previous post . I hope you all are exploring the beta version. Some of you might be wondering when will the AlmaLinux developers release a tool to migrate CentOS to AlamaLinux. While there is no news from the AlamaLinux team yet, I came across an unofficial way to migrate to AlmaLinux from CentOS 8 on Reddit.

A Reddit user has provided a simple workaround for the impatient users who wants to migrate to AlmaLinux. I followed the steps and It worked! I can able to successfully convert CentOS 8 to AlmaLinux beta version using the steps provided below. The migration process was smooth and straightforward!

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A word of caution:

Before migrating to AlmaLinux, backup all important data from your CentOS system. I tested it on a freshly installed CentOS 8 virtual machine. My CentOS VM has no data and it is a minimal installation. I would not recommend this method to migrate production systems. I strongly suggest you to test this method in your testing machine and then decide whether you want proceed the migration.

If you're not sure what to do, it is really better to wait for the official script from AlmaLinux developers.

Migrate To AlmaLinux From CentOS 8

First, update your CentOS 8 system using command as root or sudo user:

$ sudo dnf update -y

Reboot your CentOS system after the update is completed.

$ sudo reboot

Next, remove all CentOS gpg keys, repositories and branding details such as backgrounds, logos etc.

If it is a CentOS desktop system, run the following command to remove all aforementioned details:

$ sudo rpm -e --nodeps centos-backgrounds centos-indexhtml centos-gpg-keys centos-linux-release centos-linux-repos centos-logos

If it is a CentOS server with no GUI, run this command:

$ sudo rpm -e --nodeps centos-gpg-keys centos-linux-release centos-linux-repos

Next, download and install AlmaLinux release package:

$ sudo rpm -ivh https://repo.almalinux.org/almalinux/8.3-beta/BaseOS/x86_64/os/Packages/almalinux-release-8.3-2.el8.x86_64.rpm

Sample output:

Retrieving https://repo.almalinux.org/almalinux/8.3-beta/BaseOS/x86_64/os/Packages/almalinux-release-8.3-2.el8.x86_64.rpm
 warning: /var/tmp/rpm-tmp.R3ZO5W: Header V4 RSA/SHA256 Signature, key ID c21ad6ea: NOKEY
 Verifying                                                             (################################# [100%]
 Preparing                                                             (################################# [100%]
 Updating / installing 
    1:almalinux-release-8.3-2.el8                                        (################################# [100%
Install AlmaLinux release package

Finally, migrate to AlmaLinux from the CentOS 8 system using command:

$ sudo dnf distro-sync -y
Migrate To AlmaLinux From CentOS 8

This command will install some new packages, upgrade and downgrade some existing packages, reinstall a few packages and delete some packages. This will take a while depending upon the Internet connection speed and the total number of installed packages in your CentOS system. Please be patient. For me, It took around 20 minutes.

After the migration is completed, reboot your system:

$ sudo reboot

Now your system will boot to the newly migrated AlmaLinux system:

Boot to AlmaLinux

Check if the migration process is successful:

$ cat /etc/redhat-release 
AlmaLinux release 8.3 Beta (Purple Manul)
Check AlmaLinux release version

There it is! Congratulations! We have successfully migrated from CentOS 8 to AlmaLinux 8 beta version.

[Feb 03, 2021] Red Hat Expands Free RHEL to Quell CentOS Kerfuffle

How that can beat Oracle offer is unclear. Also at least two additional alternatives to CentOS are in the pipeline. AlmaLinux is due to be released in Q2 2021, is derived from CloudLinux, which an existing commercial downstream RHEL distribution. Rocky Linux from CentOS co-founder Gregory Kurtzer is also making progress and will be released this year.
Feb 03, 2021 | www.itprotoday.com

Last week, Red Hat announced it will now allow you to run Red Hat Enterprise Linux in production on up to 16 servers for free. The program, which begins on February 1, doesn't include technical support, but does include security patches and bug fixes. It's a free RHEL offering meant to appease CentOS users, who were unhappy upon learning in December 2020 that Red Hat will end support for the popular free RHEL alternative at the end of this year . (Previously, users had been promised support through 2029.)

... ... ...

One group that Red Hat already knows is deploying millions of CentOS installs are web hosting companies, who are using CentOS because they have in-house RHEL expertise and therefore don't require support. Their hosting plans typically default to CentOS, while including options for other free Linux distributions, such as Ubuntu or Debian, for those who want them

[Feb 02, 2021] Oracle does provides an equivalent to CentOS free of charge.

Red Hat knowingly allowed tens of thousands (or more) of people to undergo upgrades from CentOS7 to CentOS8, while knowing they were going to pull the plug on CentOS8. Its a huge breach of trust, borderline fraud... So it would be fair if the lose some licenses to Oracle which still provides equivalent to CentOs free of charge.
Notable quotes:
"... I'll be damned if OEL isn't a stable equivalent of RHEL. In many cases, it feels like it's more stable. ..."
"... And they have a CentOS -> OEL migration script that you could run and then you could buy their service. RedHat did not support that for a long time, so they were just leaving money/customers on the table. That seems to have changed recently, but too little too late. ..."
Dec 10, 2020 | www.reddit.com

10 hours ago

...I'll be damned if OEL isn't a stable equivalent of RHEL. In many cases, it feels like it's more stable. Download it and try it yourself: https://yum.oracle.com/oracle-linux-isos.html

... ... ...

orev 1 point· 8 hours ago

And they have a CentOS -> OEL migration script that you could run and then you could buy their service. RedHat did not support that for a long time, so they were just leaving money/customers on the table. That seems to have changed recently, but too little too late.

hawaiian717 1 point· 10 minutes ago

VirtualBox itself is GPLv2, so there's not a lot Oracle can do. The problem is the Extension Pack which is free only for personal/evaluation use; for commercial use it must be purchased.

[Jan 30, 2021] CloudLinux Hopes to Release CentOS Replacement AlmaLinux This Week

It is unclear whether it will be competitive with Oracle linux or not... The amount of funds they have is much less then in case of Oracle. As they already market clone of ISM then have substantial synergy, although not to the extent Oracle has as it need to tune it to the needs of its database division and cell commercial version of the clone which helps to recoup the costs. .
Jan 30, 2021 | www.datacenterknowledge.com

The Linux server operating system also now has a proper name: AlmaLinux. It was originally dubbed "Lenix" as a placeholder. Alma is Latin for "hope."

While the exact number of servers running CentOS is an unknown, Seletskiy is in a unique position to make an educated guess..."

"I cannot say the total number, but I'm sure that in enterprise use it's to the tune of five to ten million CentOS servers."

..."I don't know how much it will cost, to be honest," Seletskiy told us. "I know that it will definitely be at least to the tune of half a million or more."

The money will be spent in part to hire developers to maintain support for JBoss and other software that is essential to enterprise workloads, he said, in addition to the cost of creating a nonprofit organization that will hold the project's trademarks and assure members that the project will be community controlled.

[Jan 22, 2021] IBM Plunges After Reporting Lowest Q4 Revenue This Century, Slowdown In Cloud And Another Grotesque EPS Fudge

Jan 22, 2021 | www.zerohedge.com

BY TYLER DURDEN THURSDAY, JAN 21, 2021 - 16:40

IBM Plunges After Reporting Lowest Q4 Revenue This Century, Slowdown In Cloud And Another Grotesque EPS Fudge - ZeroHedge

There was some hope last year that IBM was finally turning things around: after all, after 5 consecutive quarters of declining revenues, the company had just managed to grow its top-line for the first time since Q2 2018 - when revenue grew by a paltry 0.1% - and only for the 4th time in the past 8 years. Alas it was not meant to be, and moments ago IBM revealed that revenue declined again in Q4, dropping for the third consecutive quarter, sliding a whopping 6.5%, the biggest decline since 2015 - and while Red Hat revenue rose by 19%, boosting cloud revenue by 10% (including $738MM in internal revenue), total external cloud and cognitive revenues of $6.8 billion once again missed expectations of $7.3BN, and more ominously, were a decline of 4.5% from last year.

Then again "boosted" may be using the term loosely: at $20.4BN in total revenue, and once again missing consensus expectations of a $20.6BN print, IBM's Q4 2020 was its worst fourth quarter for sales this century.

Some more Q4 revenue details, which missed across all key categories, including cloud and cognitive:

And visually:

And while IBM's Q4 adjusted, non-GAAP EPS of $2.07 beat expectations of $1.79, if down a whopping 56% Y/Y, as usual this was the product of lots of "artificial intelligence" and aggressive accounting magic because the unadjusted EPS was $1.41, or 32% below the adjusted number. Oh, and the only reason why EPS was this high: IBM reverted to its grotesque "accounting trick" of slashing its effective tax rate, which in Q4 tumbled to just 1.9% down from 8.1% a year ago.

But wait there's more, because the GAAP to non-GAAP bridge was, as usual, ridiculous and a continuation of an "one-time, non-recurring" addback trend that started so many years ago we can't even remember when, but one thing is certain: none of IBM's multiple-time, recurring charges are either one-time, or non-recurring.

about:blank

about:blank

me title=

We have said it before, but we'll say it again: here is IBM's "one-time, non-recurring" items In Q3...

... and in Q2 ...

.... and in Q1 ...

... and Q4 2019...

And here is the actual "beat" in context:

"We made progress in 2020 growing our hybrid cloud platform as the foundation for our clients' digital transformations while dealing with the broader uncertainty of the macro environment," said Arvind Krishna, IBM chairman and chief executive officer. "The actions we are taking to focus on hybrid cloud and AI will take hold, giving us confidence we can achieve revenue growth in 2021."

Maybe... and yet just like the past three quarters, IBM did not have enough "visibility" into the future to give any guidance for 2021.

There was some good news: in Q4, when IBM's free cash flow was $6.1 billion, the company did not return all of that to shareholders; instead it handed out just $1.5 billion in dividends.

So where did the remaining cash go? "In 2020 we increased investment in our business across R&D and CAPEX, and since October, announced the acquisition of seven companies focused on hybrid cloud and AI," said James Kavanaugh, IBM senior vice president and chief financial officer. "With solid cash generation, steadily expanding gross profit margins, disciplined financial management and ample liquidity, we are well positioned for success as the leading hybrid cloud platform company."

And speaking of cash flow, IBM ended the second quarter with $14.3 billion of cash on hand which includes marketable securities, up $1.3 billion from Q2. Debt, including Global Financing debt of $20.9 billion, totaled $65.4, up from $64.7 billion.

And some more good news: it appears that IBM is finally paying down its debt, which, including Global Financing debt of $21.2 billion, totaled $61.5 billion, down $3.9 billion since the end of the third quarter, and down $11.5 billion since closing the Red Hat acquisition.

Bottom line: while IBM's core business remains a melting ice cube, the bigger concern was the slowdown in Cloud growth, which led to another dismal quarter for revenue and (unadjusted EPS). Worse, now that IBM is in cash paydown mode, it means little to no growth opportunities, and after algos read through the boilerplate, was enough to send IBM stock tumbled over 3%, erasing all gains for 2021.

11,886 42 NEVER MISS THE NEWS TH

[Jan 05, 2021] Golmanization" of IBM and Red Hat: ormer Goldman Exec, Trump Advisor Gary Cohn Joins IBM As Vice Chairman

Vampire squid does not take prisoner it its pursuit for money ;-) It seems fitting that IBM brass hire a financial predator like Cohn in a bid to increase profitability at all cost. Red Hat users should probably take a note.
Jan 05, 2021 | www.zerohedge.com

Gary Cohn, the onetime No. 2 at Goldman Sachs who left the vampire squid (and cashed out hundreds of millions in performance-based incentives, tax free) back in 2017 for what turned out to be a brief, but tumultuous, stint in the Trump Administration, is returning to the boardroom and the c-suite.

After launching a SPAC, Cohn is headed to IBM, where he will serve as vice chairman and a member of the executive leadership team.

Cohn recently made headlines for refusing to return some $10MM in compensation paid out by Goldman Sachs. Cohn was the lone executive among a group of current and former Goldman leaders who stiffed the bank, which tried to claw back the bonus money as a kind of penance for Goldman's involvement in the 1MDB scandal.

Then again, hiring Cohn makes sense in at least one respect. As Big Blue scrambles to open up new markets and business lines...


stockmarketpundit 32 minutes ago

In the timeless wisdom of George Carlin, "It's a big club and you ain't in it."

J J Pettigrew 29 minutes ago (Edited)

Its a small club...the rotating board member game..

You sit I my board, I'll sit on Jim's (any name) board, Jim sits on your board...and we will all vote for heavy compensations and stock options...

see you in West Palm....

BlueLightning 10 minutes ago (Edited)

These parasites just go from one gravy train job to another. Just one big club!

Five_Black_Eyes_Intel_Agency 23 minutes ago

My all time favourite revolving door pathway is when execs jump from corporations to regulatory bodies, and back to corporations again.

Wonders get achieved, like tax evasion, forcing Americans to pay the highest drug prices in the OECD, and fantastic free lunches sponsored by US taxpayers.

[Jan 02, 2021] How to convert from CentOS or Oracle Linux to RHEL

convert2rhel is an RPM package which contains a Python2.x script written in completely incomprehensible over-modulazed manner. Python obscurantism in action ;-)
Looks like a "backbox" tool unless you know Python well. As such it is dangerous to rely upon.
Jan 02, 2021 | access.redhat.com

[Jan 02, 2021] Linux sysadmin basics- Start NIC at boot

Nov 14, 2019 | www.redhat.com

If you've ever booted a Red Hat-based system and have no network connectivity, you'll appreciate this quick fix.

Posted: | (Red Hat)

Image
"Fast Ethernet PCI Network Interface Card SN5100TX.jpg" by Jana.Wiki is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

It might surprise you to know that if you forget to flip the network interface card (NIC) switch to the ON position (shown in the image below) during installation, your Red Hat-based system will boot with the NIC disconnected:

Image
Setting the NIC to the ON position during installation.
More Linux resources

But, don't worry, in this article I'll show you how to set the NIC to connect on every boot and I'll show you how to disable/enable your NIC on demand.

If your NIC isn't enabled at startup, you have to edit the /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-NIC_name file, where NIC_name is your system's NIC device name. In my case, it's enp0s3. Yours might be eth0, eth1, em1, etc. List your network devices and their IP addresses with the ip addr command:

$ ip addr

1: lo: <LOOPBACK,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 65536 qdisc noqueue state UNKNOWN group default qlen 1000
    link/loopback 00:00:00:00:00:00 brd 00:00:00:00:00:00
    inet 127.0.0.1/8 scope host lo
       valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    inet6 ::1/128 scope host 
       valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
2: enp0s3: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc fq_codel state UP group default qlen 1000
    link/ether 08:00:27:81:d0:2d brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
3: virbr0: <NO-CARRIER,BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP> mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue state DOWN group default qlen 1000
    link/ether 52:54:00:4e:69:84 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
    inet 192.168.122.1/24 brd 192.168.122.255 scope global virbr0
       valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
4: virbr0-nic: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST> mtu 1500 qdisc fq_codel master virbr0 state DOWN group default qlen 1000
    link/ether 52:54:00:4e:69:84 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff

Note that my primary NIC (enp0s3) has no assigned IP address. I have virtual NICs because my Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 system is a VirtualBox virtual machine. After you've figured out what your physical NIC's name is, you can now edit its interface configuration file:

$ sudo vi /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-enp0s3

and change the ONBOOT="no" entry to ONBOOT="yes" as shown below:

TYPE="Ethernet"
PROXY_METHOD="none"
BROWSER_ONLY="no"
BOOTPROTO="dhcp"
DEFROUTE="yes"
IPV4_FAILURE_FATAL="no"
IPV6INIT="yes"
IPV6_AUTOCONF="yes"
IPV6_DEFROUTE="yes"
IPV6_FAILURE_FATAL="no"
IPV6_ADDR_GEN_MODE="stable-privacy"
NAME="enp0s3"
UUID="77cb083f-2ad3-42e2-9070-697cb24edf94"
DEVICE="enp0s3"
ONBOOT="yes"

Save and exit the file.

You don't need to reboot to start the NIC, but after you make this change, the primary NIC will be on and connected upon all subsequent boots.

To enable the NIC, use the ifup command:

ifup enp0s3

Connection successfully activated (D-Bus active path: /org/freedesktop/NetworkManager/ActiveConnection/5)

Now the ip addr command displays the enp0s3 device with an IP address:

$ ip addr

1: lo: <LOOPBACK,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 65536 qdisc noqueue state UNKNOWN group default qlen 1000
    link/loopback 00:00:00:00:00:00 brd 00:00:00:00:00:00
    inet 127.0.0.1/8 scope host lo
       valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    inet6 ::1/128 scope host 
       valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
2: enp0s3: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc fq_codel state UP group default qlen 1000
    link/ether 08:00:27:81:d0:2d brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
    inet 192.168.1.64/24 brd 192.168.1.255 scope global dynamic noprefixroute enp0s3
       valid_lft 86266sec preferred_lft 86266sec
    inet6 2600:1702:a40:88b0:c30:ce7e:9319:9fe0/64 scope global dynamic noprefixroute 
       valid_lft 3467sec preferred_lft 3467sec
    inet6 fe80::9b21:3498:b83c:f3d4/64 scope link noprefixroute 
       valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
3: virbr0: <NO-CARRIER,BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP> mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue state DOWN group default qlen 1000
    link/ether 52:54:00:4e:69:84 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
    inet 192.168.122.1/24 brd 192.168.122.255 scope global virbr0
       valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
4: virbr0-nic: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST> mtu 1500 qdisc fq_codel master virbr0 state DOWN group default qlen 1000
    link/ether 52:54:00:4e:69:84 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff

To disable a NIC, use the ifdown command. Please note that issuing this command from a remote system will terminate your session:

ifdown enp0s3

Connection 'enp0s3' successfully deactivated (D-Bus active path: /org/freedesktop/NetworkManager/ActiveConnection/5)

That's a wrap

It's frustrating to encounter a Linux system that has no network connection. It's more frustrating to have to connect to a virtual KVM or to walk up to the console to fix it. It's easy to miss the switch during installation, I've missed it myself. Now you know how to fix the problem and have your system network-connected on every boot, so before you drive yourself crazy with troubleshooting steps, try the ifup command to see if that's your easy fix.

Takeaways: ifup, ifdown, /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-NIC_name

[Jan 02, 2021] Looking forward to Linux network configuration in the initial ramdisk (initrd)

Nov 24, 2020 | www.redhat.com
The need for an initrd

When you press a machine's power button, the boot process starts with a hardware-dependent mechanism that loads a bootloader . The bootloader software finds the kernel on the disk and boots it. Next, the kernel mounts the root filesystem and executes an init process.

This process sounds simple, and it might be what actually happens on some Linux systems. However, modern Linux distributions have to support a vast set of use cases for which this procedure is not adequate.

First, the root filesystem could be on a device that requires a specific driver. Before trying to mount the filesystem, the right kernel module must be inserted into the running kernel. In some cases, the root filesystem is on an encrypted partition and therefore needs a userspace helper that asks the passphrase to the user and feeds it to the kernel. Or, the root filesystem could be shared over the network via NFS or iSCSI, and mounting it may first require configured IP addresses and routes on a network interface.

[ You might also like: Linux networking: 13 uses for netstat ]

To overcome these issues, the bootloader can pass to the kernel a small filesystem image (the initrd) that contains scripts and tools to find and mount the real root filesystem. Once this is done, the initrd switches to the real root, and the boot continues as usual.

The dracut infrastructure

On Fedora and RHEL, the initrd is built through dracut . From its home page , dracut is "an event-driven initramfs infrastructure. dracut (the tool) is used to create an initramfs image by copying tools and files from an installed system and combining it with the dracut framework, usually found in /usr/lib/dracut/modules.d ."

A note on terminology: Sometimes, the names initrd and initramfs are used interchangeably. They actually refer to different ways of building the image. An initrd is an image containing a real filesystem (for example, ext2) that gets mounted by the kernel. An initramfs is a cpio archive containing a directory tree that gets unpacked as a tmpfs. Nowadays, the initrd images are deprecated in favor of the initramfs scheme. However, the initrd name is still used to indicate the boot process involving a temporary filesystem.

Kernel command-line

Let's revisit the NFS-root scenario that was mentioned before. One possible way to boot via NFS is to use a kernel command-line containing the root=dhcp argument.

The kernel command-line is a list of options passed to the kernel from the bootloader, accessible to the kernel and applications. If you use GRUB, it can be changed by pressing the e key on a boot entry and editing the line starting with linux .

The dracut code inside the initramfs parses the kernel command-line and starts DHCP on all interfaces if the command-line contains root=dhcp . After obtaining a DHCP lease, dracut configures the interface with the parameters received (IP address and routes); it also extracts the value of the root-path DHCP option from the lease. The option carries an NFS server's address and path (which could be, for example, 192.168.50.1:/nfs/client ). Dracut then mounts the NFS share at this location and proceeds with the boot.

If there is no DHCP server providing the address and the NFS root path, the values can be configured explicitly in the command line:

root=nfs:192.168.50.1:/nfs/client ip=192.168.50.101:::24::ens2:none

Here, the first argument specifies the NFS server's address, and the second configures the ens2 interface with a static IP address.

There are two syntaxes to specify network configuration for an interface:

ip=<interface>:{dhcp|on|any|dhcp6|auto6}[:[<mtu>][:<macaddr>]]

ip=<client-IP>:[<peer>]:<gateway-IP>:<netmask>:<client_hostname>:<interface>:{none|off|dhcp|on|any|dhcp6|auto6|ibft}[:[<mtu>][:<macaddr>]]

The first can be used for automatic configuration (DHCP or IPv6 SLAAC), and the second for static configuration or a combination of automatic and static. Here some examples:

ip=enp1s0:dhcp
ip=192.168.10.30::192.168.10.1:24::enp1s0:none
ip=[2001:0db8::02]::[2001:0db8::01]:64::enp1s0:none

Note that if you pass an ip= option, but dracut doesn't need networking to mount the root filesystem, the option is ignored. To force network configuration without a network root, add rd.neednet=1 to the command line.

You probably noticed that among automatic configuration methods, there is also ibft . iBFT stands for iSCSI Boot Firmware Table and is a mechanism to pass parameters about iSCSI devices from the firmware to the operating system. iSCSI (Internet Small Computer Systems Interface) is a protocol to access network storage devices. Describing iBFT and iSCSI is outside the scope of this article. What is important is that by passing ip=ibft to the kernel, the network configuration is retrieved from the firmware.

Dracut also supports adding custom routes, specifying the machine name and DNS servers, creating bonds, bridges, VLANs, and much more. See the dracut.cmdline man page for more details.

Network modules

The dracut framework included in the initramfs has a modular architecture. It comprises a series of modules, each containing scripts and binaries to provide specific functionality. You can see which modules are available to be included in the initramfs with the command dracut --list-modules .

At the moment, there are two modules to configure the network: network-legacy and network-manager . You might wonder why different modules provide the same functionality.

network-legacy is older and uses shell scripts calling utilities like iproute2 , dhclient , and arping to configure interfaces. After the switch to the real root, a different network configuration service runs. This service is not aware of what the network-legacy module intended to do and the current state of each interface. This can lead to problems maintaining the state across the root switch boundary.

A prominent example of a state to be kept is the DHCP lease. If an interface's address changed during the boot, the connection to an NFS share would break, causing a boot failure.

To ensure a seamless transition, there is a need for a mechanism to pass the state between the two environments. However, passing the state between services having different configuration models can be a problem.

The network-manager dracut module was created to improve this situation. The module runs NetworkManager in the initrd to configure connection profiles generated from the kernel command-line. Once done, NetworkManager serializes its state, which is later read by the NetworkManager instance in the real root.

Fedora 31 was the first distribution to switch to network-manager in initrd by default. On RHEL 8.2, network-legacy is still the default, but network-manager is available. On RHEL 8.3, dracut will use network-manager by default.

Enabling a different network module

While the two modules should be largely compatible, there are some differences in behavior. Some of those are documented in the nm-initrd-generator man page. In general, it is suggested to use the network-manager module when NetworkManager is enabled.

To rebuild the initrd using a specific network module, use one of the following commands:

# dracut --add network-legacy  --force --verbose
# dracut --add network-manager --force --verbose

Since this change will be reverted the next time the initrd is rebuilt, you may want to make the change permanent in the following way:

# echo 'add_dracutmodules+=" network-manager "' > /etc/dracut.conf.d/network-module.conf
# dracut --regenerate-all --force --verbose

The --regenerate-all option also rebuilds all the initramfs images for the kernel versions found on the system.

The network-manager dracut module

As with all dracut modules, the network-manager module is split into stages that are called at different times during the boot (see the dracut.modules man page for more details).

The first stage parses the kernel command-line by calling /usr/libexec/nm-initrd-generator to produce a list of connection profiles in /run/NetworkManager/system-connections . The second part of the module runs after udev has settled, i.e., after userspace has finished handling the kernel events for devices (including network interfaces) found in the system.

When NM is started in the real root environment, it registers on D-Bus, configures the network, and remains active to react to events or D-Bus requests. In the initrd, NetworkManager is run in the configure-and-quit=initrd mode, which doesn't register on D-Bus (since it's not available in the initrd, at least for now) and exits after reaching the startup-complete event.

The startup-complete event is triggered after all devices with a matching connection profile have tried to activate, successfully or not. Once all interfaces are configured, NM exits and calls dracut hooks to notify other modules that the network is available.

Note that the /run/NetworkManager directory containing generated connection profiles and other runtime state is copied over to the real root so that the new NetworkManager process running there knows exactly what to do.

Troubleshooting

If you have network issues in dracut, this section contains some suggestions for investigating the problem.

The first thing to do is add rd.debug to the kernel command-line, enabling debug logging in dracut. Logs are saved to /run/initramfs/rdsosreport.txt and are also available in the journal.

If the system doesn't boot, it is useful to get a shell inside the initrd environment to manually check why things aren't working. For this, there is an rd.break command-line argument. Note that the argument spawns a shell when the initrd has finished its job and is about to give control to the init process in the real root filesystem. To stop at a different stage of dracut (for example, after command-line parsing), use the following argument:

rd.break={cmdline|pre-udev|pre-trigger|initqueue|pre-mount|mount|pre-pivot|cleanup}

The initrd image contains a minimal set of binaries; if you need a specific tool at the dracut shell, you can rebuild the image, adding what is missing. For example, to add the ping and tcpdump binaries (including all their dependent libraries), run:

# dracut -f  --install "ping tcpdump"

and then optionally verify that they were included successfully:

# lsinitrd | grep "ping\|tcpdump"
Arguments: -f --install 'ping tcpdump'
-rwxr-xr-x   1 root     root        82960 May 18 10:26 usr/bin/ping
lrwxrwxrwx   1 root     root           11 May 29 20:35 usr/sbin/ping -> ../bin/ping
-rwxr-xr-x   1 root     root      1065224 May 29 20:35 usr/sbin/tcpdump
The generator

If you are familiar with NetworkManager configuration, you might want to know how a given kernel command-line is translated into NetworkManager connection profiles. This can be useful to better understand the configuration mechanism and find syntax errors in the command-line without having to boot the machine.

The generator is installed in /usr/libexec/nm-initrd-generator and must be called with the list of kernel arguments after a double dash. The --stdout option prints the generated connections on standard output. Let's try to call the generator with a sample command line:

$ /usr/libexec/nm-initrd-generator --stdout -- \
          ip=enp1s0:dhcp:00:99:88:77:66:55 rd.peerdns=0

802-3-ethernet.cloned-mac-address: '99:88:77:66:55' is not a valid MAC
address

In this example, the generator reports an error because there is a missing field for the MTU after enp1s0 . Once the error is corrected, the parsing succeeds and the tool prints out the connection profile generated:

$ /usr/libexec/nm-initrd-generator --stdout -- \
        ip=enp1s0:dhcp::00:99:88:77:66:55 rd.peerdns=0

*** Connection 'enp1s0' ***

[connection]
id=enp1s0
uuid=e1fac965-4319-4354-8ed2-39f7f6931966
type=ethernet
interface-name=enp1s0
multi-connect=1
permissions=

[ethernet]
cloned-mac-address=00:99:88:77:66:55
mac-address-blacklist=

[ipv4]
dns-search=
ignore-auto-dns=true
may-fail=false
method=auto

[ipv6]
addr-gen-mode=eui64
dns-search=
ignore-auto-dns=true
method=auto

[proxy]

Note how the rd.peerdns=0 argument translates into the ignore-auto-dns=true property, which makes NetworkManager ignore DNS servers received via DHCP. An explanation of NetworkManager properties can be found on the nm-settings man page.

[ Network getting out of control? Check out Network automation for everyone, a free book from Red Hat . ]

Conclusion

The NetworkManager dracut module is enabled by default in Fedora and will also soon be enabled on RHEL. It brings better integration between networking in the initrd and NetworkManager running in the real root filesystem.

While the current implementation is working well, there are some ideas for possible improvements. One is to abandon the configure-and-quit=initrd mode and run NetworkManager as a daemon started by a systemd service. In this way, NetworkManager will be run in the same way as when it's run in the real root, reducing the code to be maintained and tested.

To completely drop the configure-and-quit=initrd mode, NetworkManager should also be able to register on D-Bus in the initrd. Currently, dracut doesn't have any module providing a D-Bus daemon because the image should be minimal. However, there are already proposals to include it as it is needed to implement some new features.

With D-Bus running in the initrd, NetworkManager's powerful API will be available to other tools to query and change the network state, unlocking a wide range of applications. One of those is to run nm-cloud-setup in the initrd. The service, shipped in the NetworkManager-cloud-setup Fedora package fetches metadata from cloud providers' infrastructure (EC2, Azure, GCP) to automatically configure the network.

[Jan 01, 2021] Looks like potentially Oracle can pickup up to 65% of CentOS users

Jan 01, 2021 | forums.centos.org

What do you think of the recent Red Hat announcement about CentOS Linux/Stream?

I can use either CentOS Linux or Stream and it makes no difference to me
6
11%
I will switch reluctantly to CentOS Stream but I'd rather not
2
4%
I depend on CentOS Linux 8 and its stability and now I need a new alternative
10
19%
I love the idea of CentOS Stream and can't wait to use it
1
2%
I'm off to a different distribution before CentOS 8 sunsets at the end of 2021
13
24%
I feel completely betrayed by this decision and will avoid Red Hat solutions in future
22
41%
Total votes: 54

[Jan 01, 2021] Oracle Linux DTrace

Jan 01, 2021 | www.oracle.com

... DTrace gives the operational insights that have long been missing in the data center, such as memory consumption, CPU time or what specific function calls are being made.

Developers can learn about and experiment with DTrace on Oracle Linux by installing the appropriate RPMs:

[Jan 01, 2021] Oracle Linux vs. Red Hat Enterprise Linux by Jim Brull

Jan 05, 2019 | www.centroid.com

... ... ...

Here's what we found.

[Jan 01, 2021] Consider looking at openSUSE (still run out of Germany)

Jan 01, 2021 | www.reddit.com

If you are on CentOS-7 then you will probably be okay until RedHat pulls the plug on 2024-06-30 so do don't do anything rash. If you are on CentOS-8 then your days are numbered (to ~ 365) because this OS will shift from major-minor point updates to a streaming model at the end of 2021. Let's look at two early founders: SUSE started in Germany in 1991 whilst RedHat started in America a year later. SUSE sells support for SLE (Suse Linux Enterprise) which means you need a license to install-run-update-upgrade it. Likewise RedHat sells support for RHEL (Red Hat Enterprise Linux). SUSE also offers "openSUSE Leap" (released once a year as a major-minor point release of SLE) and "openSUSE Tumbleweed" (which is a streaming thingy). A couple of days ago I installed "OpenSUSE Leap" onto an old HP-Compaq 6000 desktop just to try it out (the installer actually had a few features I liked better than the CentOS-7 installer). When I get back to the office in two weeks, I'm going to try installing "OpenSUSE Leap" onto an HP-DL385p_gen8. I'll work with this for a few months and I am comfortable, I will migrate my employer's solution over to "OpenSUSE Leap".

Parting thoughts:

  1. openSUSE is run out of Germany. IMHO switching over to a European distro is similar to those database people who preferred MariaDB to MySQL when Oracle was still hoping that MySQL would die from neglect.

  2. Someone cracked off to me the other day that now that IBM is pulling strings at "Red Hat", that the company should be renamed "Blue Hat"

7 comments 47% Upvoted Log in or sign up to leave a comment Log In Sign Up Sort by level 1

general-noob 4 points · 3 days ago

I downloaded and tried it last week and was actually pretty impressed. I have only ever tested SUSE in the past. Honestly, I'll stick with Red Hat/CentOS whatever, but I was still impressed. I'd recommend people take a look.

servingwater 2 points · 3 days ago

I have been playing with OpenSUSE a bit, too. Very solid this time around. In the past I never had any luck with it. But Leap 15.2 is doing fine for me. Just testing it virtually. TW also is pretty sweet and if I were to use a rolling release, it would be among the top contenders.

One thing I don't like with OpenSUSE is that you can't really, or are not supposed to I guess, disable the root account. You can't do it at install, if you leave the root account blank suse, will just assign the password for the user you created to it.
Of course afterwards you can disable it with the proper commands but it becomes a pain with YAST, as it seems YAST insists on being opened by root.

neilrieck 2 points · 2 days ago

Thanks for that "heads about" about root

gdhhorn 1 point · 2 days ago

One thing I don't like with OpenSUSE is that you can't really, or are not supposed to I guess, disable the root account. You can't do it at install, if you leave the root account blank suse, will just assign the password for the user you created to it.

I'm running Leap 15.2 on the laptops my kids run for school. During installation, I simply deselected the option for the account used to be an administrator; this required me to set a different password for administrative purposes.

Perhaps I'm misunderstanding your comment.

servingwater 1 point · 2 days ago

I think you might.
My point is/was that if I select to choose my regular user to be admin, I don't expect for the system to create and activate a root account anyways and then just assign it my password.
I expect the root account to be disabled.

gdhhorn 2 points · 2 days ago

I didn't realize it made a user, 'root,' and auto generated a password. I'd always assumed if I said to make the user account admin, that was it.

TIL, thanks.

servingwater 1 point · 2 days ago

I was surprised, too. I was bit "shocked" when I realized, after the install, that I could login as root with my user password.
At the very least, IMHO, it should then still have you set the root password, even if you choose to make your user admin.
It for one lets you know that OpenSUSE is not disabling root and two gives you a chance to give it a different password.
But other than that subjective issue I found OpenSUSE Leap a very solid distro.

[Jan 01, 2021] What about the big academic labs? (Fermilab, CERN, DESY, etc)

Jan 01, 2021 | www.reddit.com

The big academic labs (Fermilab, CERN and DESY to only name three of many used to run something called Scientific Linux which was also maintained by Red Hat.see: https://scientificlinux.org/ and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scientific_Linux Shortly after Red Hat acquired CentOS in 2014, Red Hat convinced the big academic labs to begin migrating over to CentOS (no one at that time thought that Red Hat would become Blue Hat) 11 comments 67% Upvoted Log in or sign up to leave a comment Log In Sign Up Sort by level 1

phil_g 14 points · 2 days ago

To clarify, as a user of Scientific Linux:

Scientific Linux is not and was not maintained by Red Hat. Like CentOS, when it was truly a community distribution, Scientific Linux was an independent rebuild of the RHEL source code published by Red Hat. It is maintained primarily by people at Fermilab. (It's slightly different from CentOS in that CentOS aimed for binary compatibility with RHEL, while that is not a goal of Scientific Linux. In practice, SL often achieves binary compatibility, but if you have issues with that, it's more up to you to fix them than the SL maintainers.)

I don't know anything about Red Hat convincing institutions to stop using Scientific Linux; the first I heard about the topic was in April 2019 when Fermilab announced there would be no Scientific Linux 8 . (They may reverse that decision. At the moment, they're " investigating the best path forward ", with a decision to be announced in the first few months of 2021.) level 2 neilrieck 4 points · 2 days ago

I fear you are correct. I just stumbled onto this article: https://www.linux.com/training-tutorials/scientific-linux-great-distro-wrong-name/ Even the wikipedia article states "This product is derived from the free and open-source software made available by Red Hat, but is not produced, maintained or supported by them." But it does seem that Scientific Linux was created as a replacement for Fermilab Linux. I've also seen references to CC7 to mean "Cern Centos 7". CERN is keeping their Linux page up to date because what I am seeing here ( https://linux.web.cern.ch/ ) today is not what I saw 2-weeks ago.

There are

Niarbeht 16 points · 2 days ago

There are

Uh oh, guys, they got him!

deja_geek 9 points · 2 days ago

RedHat didn't convince them to stop using Scientific Linux, Fermilab no longer needed to have their own rebuild of RHEL sources. They switched to CentOS and modified CentOS if they needed to (though I don't really think they needed to)

meat_bunny 10 points · 2 days ago

Maintaining your own distro is a pain in the ass.

My crystal ball says they'll just use whatever RHEL rebuild floats to the top in a few months like the rest of us.

carlwgeorge 2 points · 2 days ago

SL has always been an independent rebuild. It has never been maintained, sponsored, or owned by Red Hat. They decided on their own to not build 8 and instead collaborate on CentOS. They even gained representation on the CentOS board (one from Fermi, one from CERN).

I'm not affiliated with any of those organizations, but my guess is they will switch to some combination of CentOS Stream and RHEL (under the upcoming no/low cost program).

VestoMSlipher 1 point · 11 hours ago

https://linux.web.cern.ch/#information-on-change-of-end-of-life-for-centos-8

[Jan 01, 2021] CentOS HAS BEEN CANCELLED !!!

Jan 01, 2021 | forums.centos.org

Re: CentOS HAS BEEN CANCELLED !!!

Post by whoop " 2020/12/08 20:00:36

Is anybody considering switching to RHEL's free non-production developer subscription? As I understand it, it is free and receives updates.
The only downside as I understand it is that you have to renew your license every year (and that you can't use it in commercial production).

[Dec 30, 2020] Switching from CentOS to Oracle Linux: a hands-on example

In view of the such effective and free promotion of Oracle Linux by IBM/Red Hat brass as the top replacement for CentOS, the script can probably be slightly enhanced.
The script works well for simple systems, but still has some sharp edges. Checks for common bottlenecks should be added. For exmple scale in /boot should be checked if this is a separate filesystem. It was not done. See my Also, in case it was invoked the second time after the failure of the step "Installing base packages for Oracle Linux..." it can remove hundreds of system RPM (including sshd, cron, and several other vital packages ;-).
And failures on this step are probably the most common type of failures in conversion. Inexperienced sysadmins or even experienced sysadmins in a hurry often make this blunder running the script the second time.
It probably happens due to the presence of the line 'yum remove -y "${new_releases[@]}" ' in the function remove_repos, because in their excessive zeal to restore the system after error the programmers did not understand that in certain situations those packages that they want to delete via YUM have dependences and a lot of them (line 65 in the current version of the script) Yum blindly deletes over 300 packages including such vital as sshd, cron, etc. Due to this execution of the script probably should be blocked if Oracle repositories are already present. This check is absent.
After this "mass extinction of RPM packages," event you need to be pretty well versed in yum to recover. The names of the deleted packages are in yum log, so you can reinstall them and something it helps. In other cases system remain unbootable and the restore from the backup is the only option.
Due sudden surge of popularity of Oracle Linux due to Red Hat CentOS8 fiasco, the script definitely can benefit from better diagnostics. The current diagnostic is very rudimentary. It might also make sense to make steps modular in the classic /etc/init.d fashion and make initial steps shippable so that the script can be resumed after the error. Most of the steps have few dependencies, which can be resolved by saving variables during the first run and sourcing them if the the first step is not step 1.
Also, it makes sense to check the amount of free space in /boot filesystem if /boot is a separate filesystem. The script requires approx 100MB of free space in this filesystem. Failure to write a new kernel to it due to the lack of free space leads to the situation of "half-baked" installation, which is difficult to recover without senior sysadmin skills.
See additional considerations about how to enhance the script at http://www.softpanorama.org/Commercial_linuxes/Oracle_linux/conversion_of_centos_to_oracle_linux.shtml
Dec 15, 2020 Simon Coter Blog

... ... ...

We published a blog post earlier this week that explains why , but here is the TL;DR version:

For these reasons, we created a simple script to allow users to switch from CentOS to Oracle Linux about five years ago. This week, we moved the script to GitHub to allow members of the CentOS community to help us improve and extend the script to cover more CentOS respins and use cases.

The script can switch CentOS Linux 6, 7 or 8 to the equivalent version of Oracle Linux. Let's take a look at just how simple the process is.

Download the centos2ol.sh script from GitHub

The simplest way to get the script is to use curl :

$ curl -O https://raw.githubusercontent.com/oracle/centos2ol/main/centos2ol.sh
% Total % Received % Xferd Average Speed Time Time Time Current
Dload Upload Total Spent Left Speed
100 10747 100 10747 0 0 31241 0 --:--:-- --:--:-- --:--:-- 31241

If you have git installed, you could clone the git repository from GitHub instead.

Run the centos2ol.sh script to switch to Oracle Linux

To switch to Oracle Linux, just run the script as root using sudo :

$ sudo bash centos2ol.sh

Sample output of script run .

As part of the process, the default kernel is switched to the latest release of Oracle's Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel (UEK) to enable extensive performance and scalability improvements to the process scheduler, memory management, file systems, and the networking stack. We also replace the existing CentOS kernel with the equivalent Red Hat Compatible Kernel (RHCK) which may be required by any specific hardware or application that has imposed strict kernel version restrictions.

Switching the default kernel (optional)

Once the switch is complete, but before rebooting, the default kernel can be changed back to the RHCK. First, use grubby to list all installed kernels:

[demo@c8switch ~]$ sudo grubby --info=ALL | grep ^kernel
[sudo] password for demo:
kernel="/boot/vmlinuz-5.4.17-2036.101.2.el8uek.x86_64"
kernel="/boot/vmlinuz-4.18.0-240.1.1.el8_3.x86_64"
kernel="/boot/vmlinuz-4.18.0-193.el8.x86_64"
kernel="/boot/vmlinuz-0-rescue-0dbb9b2f3c2744779c72a28071755366"

In the output above, the first entry (index 0) is UEK R6, based on the mainline kernel version 5.4. The second kernel is the updated RHCK (Red Hat Compatible Kernel) installed by the switch process while the third one is the kernel that were installed by CentOS and the final entry is the rescue kernel.

Next, use grubby to verify that UEK is currently the default boot option:

[demo@c8switch ~]$ sudo grubby --default-kernel
/boot/vmlinuz-5.4.17-2036.101.2.el8uek.x86_64

To replace the default kernel, you need to specify either the path to its vmlinuz file or its index. Use grubby to get that information for the replacement:

[demo@c8switch ~]$ sudo grubby --info /boot/vmlinuz-4.18.0-240.1.1.el8_3.x86_64
index=1
kernel="/boot/vmlinuz-4.18.0-240.1.1.el8_3.x86_64"
args="ro crashkernel=auto resume=/dev/mapper/cl-swap rd.lvm.lv=cl/root rd.lvm.lv=cl/swap rhgb quiet $tuned_params"
root="/dev/mapper/cl-root"
initrd="/boot/initramfs-4.18.0-240.1.1.el8_3.x86_64.img $tuned_initrd"
title="Oracle Linux Server (4.18.0-240.1.1.el8_3.x86_64) 8.3"
id="0dbb9b2f3c2744779c72a28071755366-4.18.0-240.1.1.el8_3.x86_64"

Finally, use grubby to change the default kernel, either by providing the vmlinuz path:

[demo@c8switch ~]$ sudo grubby --set-default /boot/vmlinuz-4.18.0-240.1.1.el8_3.x86_64
The default is /boot/loader/entries/0dbb9b2f3c2744779c72a28071755366-4.18.0-240.1.1.el8_3.x86_64.conf with index 1 and kernel /boot/vmlinuz-4.18.0-240.1.1.el8_3.x86_64

Or its index:

[demo@c8switch ~]$ sudo grubby --set-default-index 1
The default is /boot/loader/entries/0dbb9b2f3c2744779c72a28071755366-4.18.0-240.1.1.el8_3.x86_64.conf with index 1 and kernel /boot/vmlinuz-4.18.0-240.1.1.el8_3.x86_64

Changing the default kernel can be done at any time, so we encourage you to take UEK for a spin before switching back.

It's easy to access, try it out.

For more information visit oracle.com/linux .

[Dec 30, 2020] HPE ClearOS

Dec 30, 2020 | arstechnica.com

The last of the RHEL downstreams up for discussion today is Hewlett-Packard Enterprise's in-house distro, ClearOS . Hewlett-Packard makes ClearOS available as a pre-installed option on its ProLiant server line, and the company offers a free Community version to all comers.

ClearOS is an open source software platform that leverages the open source model to deliver a simplified, low cost hybrid IT experience for SMBs. The value of ClearOS is the integration of free open source technologies making it easier to use. By not charging for open source, ClearOS focuses on the value SMBs gain from the integration so SMBs only pay for the products and services they need and value.

ClearOS is mostly notable here for its association with industry giant HPE and its availability as an OEM distro on ProLiant servers. It seems to be a bit behind the times -- the most recent version is ClearOS 7.x, which is in turn based on RHEL 7. In addition to being a bit outdated compared with other options, it also appears to be a rolling release itself -- more comparable to CentOS Stream itself, than to the CentOS Linux that came before it.

ClearOS is probably most interesting to small business types who might consider buying ProLiant servers with RHEL-compatible OEM Linux pre-installed later.

[Dec 30, 2020] Where do I go now that CentOS Linux is gone- Check our list - Ars Technica

Dec 30, 2020 | arstechnica.com

Springdale Linux

I've seen a lot of folks mistakenly recommending the deceased Scientific Linux distro as a CentOS replacement -- that won't work, because Scientific Linux itself was deprecated in favor of CentOS. However, Springdale Linux is very similar -- like Scientific Linux, it's a RHEL rebuild distro made by and for the academic scientific community. Unlike Scientific Linux, it's still actively maintained!

Springdale Linux is maintained and made available by Princeton and Rutgers universities, who use it for their HPC projects. It has been around for quite a long time. One Springdale Linux user from Carnegie Mellon describes their own experience with Springdale (formerly PUIAS -- Princeton University Institute for Advanced Study) as a 10-year ride.

Theresa Arzadon-Labajo, one of Springdale Linux's maintainers, gave a pretty good seat-of-the-pants overview in a recent mailing list discussion :

The School of Mathematics at the Institute for Advanced Study has been using Springdale (formerly PUIAS, then PU_IAS) since its inception. All of our *nix servers and workstations (yes, workstations) are running Springdale. On the server side, everything "just works", as is expected from a RHEL clone. On the workstation side, most of the issues we run into have to do with NVIDIA drivers, and glibc compatibility issues (e.g Chrome, Dropbox, Skype, etc), but most issues have been resolved or have a workaround in place.

... Springdale is a community project, and [it] mostly comes down to the hours (mostly Josko) that we can volunteer to the project. The way people utilize Springdale varies. Some are like us and use the whole thing. Others use a different OS and use Springdale just for its computational repositories.

Springdale Linux should be a natural fit for universities and scientists looking for a CentOS replacement. It will likely work for most anyone who needs it -- but its relatively small community and firm roots in academia will probably make it the most comfortable for those with similar needs and environments.

[Dec 30, 2020] GhostBSD and a few others are spearheading a charge into the face of The Enemy, making BSD palatable for those of us steeped in Linux as the only alternative to we know who.

Dec 30, 2020 | distrowatch.com

64"best idea" ... (by Otis on 2020-12-25 19:38:01 GMT from United States)
@62 dang it BSD takes care of all that anxiety about systemd and the other bloaty-with-time worries as far as I can tell. GhostBSD and a few others are spearheading a charge into the face of The Enemy, making BSD palatable for those of us steeped in Linux as the only alternative to we know who.

[Dec 30, 2020] Scientific Linux website states that they are going to reconsider (in 1st quarter of 2021) whether they will produce a clone of rhel version 8. Previously, they stated that they would not.

Dec 30, 2020 | distrowatch.com

Centos (by David on 2020-12-22 04:29:46 GMT from United States)
I was using Centos 8.2 on an older, desktop home computer. When Centos dropped long term support on version 8, I was a little peeved, but not a whole lot, since it is free, anyway. Out of curiosity I installed Scientific Linux 7.9 on the same computer, and it works better that Centos 8. Then I tried installing SL 7.9 on my old laptop -- it even worked on that!

Previously, when I had tried to install Centos 8 on the laptop, an old Dell inspiron 1501, the graphics were garbage --the screen displayed kind of a color mosaic --and the keyboard/everthing else was locked up. I also tried Centos 7.9 on it and installation from minimal dvd produced a bunch of errors and then froze part way through.

I will stick with Scientific Linux 7 for now. In 2024 I will worry about which distro to migrate to. Note: Scientific Linux websites states that they are going to reconsider (in 1st quarter of 2021) whether they will produce a clone of rhel version 8. Previously, they stated that they would not.

[Dec 30, 2020] Springdale vs. CentOS

Dec 30, 2020 | distrowatch.com

52Springdale vs. CentOS (by whoKnows on 2020-12-23 05:39:01 GMT from Switzerland)

@51 • Personal opinion only. (by R. Cain)

"Personal opinion only. [...] After all the years of using Linux, and experiencing first-hand the hobby mentality that has taken over [...], I prefer to use a distribution which has all the earmarks of [...] being developed AND MAINTAINED by a professional organization."

Yeah, your answer is exactly what I expected it to be.

The thing with Springdale is as following: it's maintained by the very professional team of IT specialists at the Institute for Advanced Study (Princeton University) for the own needs. That's why there's no fancy website, RHEL Wiki, live ISOs and such.

They also maintain several other repositories for add-on packages (computing, unsupported [with audio/video codecs] ...).

With other words, if you're a professional who needs an RHEL clone, you'll be fine with it; if you're a hobbyist who needs a how-to on everything and anything, you can still use the knowledge base of RHEL/CentOS/Oracle ...

If you're 'small business' who needs a professional support, you'd get RHEL - unlike CentOS, Springdale is not a commercial distribution selling you support and schooling. Springdale is made by professional and for the professionals.

https://www.ias.edu/math/computing/Springdale-Linux
https://researchcomputing.princeton.edu/faq/what-is-a-cluster

[Dec 29, 2020] Migrer de CentOS Oracle Linux Petit retour d'exp rience Le blog technique de Microlinux

Highly recommended!
Google translation
Notable quotes:
"... Free to use, free to download, free to update. Always ..."
"... Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel ..."
"... (What You Get Is What You Get ..."
Dec 30, 2020 | blog.microlinux.fr

In 2010 I had the opportunity to put my hands in the shambles of Oracle Linux during an installation and training mission carried out on behalf of ASF (Highways of the South of France) which is now called Vinci Autoroutes. I had just published Linux on the onions at Eyrolles, and since the CentOS 5.3 distribution on which it was based looked 99% like Oracle Linux 5.3 under the hood, I had been chosen by the company ASF to train their future Linux administrators.

All these years, I knew that Oracle Linux existed, as did another series of Red Hat clones like CentOS, Scientific Linux, White Box Enterprise Linux, Princeton University's PUIAS project, etc. I didn't care any more, since CentOS perfectly met all my server needs.

Following the disastrous announcement of the CentOS project, I had a discussion with my compatriot Michael Kofler, a Linux guru who has published a series of excellent books on our favorite operating system, and who has migrated from CentOS to Oracle Linux for the Linux ad administration courses he teaches at the University of Graz. We were not in our first discussion on this subject, as the CentOS project was already accumulating a series of rather worrying delays for version 8 updates. In comparison, Oracle Linux does not suffer from these structural problems, so I kept this option in a corner of my head.

A problematic reputation

Oracle suffers from a problematic reputation within the free software community, for a variety of reasons. It was the company that ruined OpenOffice and Java, put the hook on MySQL and let Solaris sink. Oracle CEO Larry Ellison has been the center of his name because of his unhinged support for Donald Trump. As for the company's commercial policy, it has been marked by a notorious aggressiveness in the hunt for patents.

On the other hand, we have free and free apps like VirtualBox, which run perfectly on millions of developer workstations all over the world. And then the very discreet Oracle Linux , which works perfectly and without making any noise since 2006, and which is also a free and free operating system.

Install Oracle Linux

For a first test, I installed Oracle Linux 7.9 and 8.3 in two virtual machines on my workstation. Since it is a Red Hat Enterprise Linux-compliant clone, the installation procedure is identical to that of RHEL and CentOS, with a few small details.

Oracle Linux Installation

Info Normally, I never care about banner ads that scroll through graphic installers. This time, the slogan Free to use, free to download, free to update. Always still caught my attention.

An indestructible kernel?

Oracle Linux provides its own Linux kernel newer than the one provided by Red Hat, and named Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel (UEK). This kernel is installed by default and replaces older kernels provided upstream for versions 7 and 8. Here's what it looks like oracle Linux 7.9.

$ uname -a
Linux oracle-el7 5.4.17-2036.100.6.1.el7uek.x86_64 #2 SMP Thu Oct 29 17:04:48 
PDT 2020 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux
Well-crafted packet deposits

At first glance, the organization of official and semi-official package filings seems much clearer and better organized than under CentOS. For details, I refer you to the respective explanatory pages for the 7.x and 8.x versions.

Well-structured documentation

Like the organization of deposits, Oracle Linux's documentation is worth mentioning here, because it is simply exemplary. The main index refers to the different versions of Oracle Linux, and from there, you can access a whole series of documents in HTML and PDF formats that explain in detail the peculiarities of the system and its day-to-day management. As I go along with this documentation, I discover a multitude of pleasant little details, such as the fact that Oracle packages display metadata for security updates, which is not the case for CentOS packages.

Migrating from CentOS to Oracle Linux

The Switch your CentOS systems to Oracle Linux web page identifies a number of reasons why Oracle Linux is a better choice than CentOS when you want to have a company-grade free as in free beer operating system, which provides low-risk updates for each version over a decade. This page also features a script that transforms an existing CentOS system into a two-command Oracle Linux system on the fly. centos2ol.sh

So I tested this script on a CentOS 7 server from Online/Scaleway.

# curl -O https://linux.oracle.com/switch/centos2ol.sh
# chmod +x centos2ol.sh
# ./centos2ol.sh

The script grinds about twenty minutes, we restart the machine and we end up with a clean Oracle Linux system. To do some cleaning, just remove the deposits of saved packages.

# rm -f /etc/yum.repos.d/*.repo.deactivated
Migrating a CentOS 8.x server?

At first glance, the script only predicted the migration of CentOS 7.9 to Oracle Linux 7.9. On a whim, I sent an email to the address at the bottom of the page, asking if support for CentOS 8.x was expected in the near future. centos2ol.sh

A very nice exchange of emails ensued with a guy from Oracle, who patiently answered all the questions I asked him. And just twenty-four hours later, he sent me a link to an Oracle Github repository with an updated version of the script that supports the on-the-fly migration of CentOS 8.x to Oracle Linux 8.x.

So I tested it with a cool installation of a CentOS 8 server at Online/Scaleway.

# yum install git
# git clone https://github.com/oracle/centos2ol.git
# cd centos2ol/
# chmod +x centos2ol.sh
# ./centos2ol.sh

Again, it grinds a good twenty minutes, and at the end of the restart, we end up with a public machine running oracle Linux 8.

Conclusion

I will probably have a lot more to say about that. For my part, I find this first experience with Oracle Linux rather conclusive, and if I decided to share it here, it is that it will probably solve a common problem to a lot of admins of production servers who do not support their system becoming a moving target overnight.

Post Scriptum for the chilly purists

Finally, for all of you who want to use a free and free clone of Red Hat Enterprise Linux without selling their soul to the devil, know that Springdale Linux is a solid alternative. It is maintained by Princeton University in the United States according to the principle WYGIWYG (What You Get Is What You Get ), it is provided raw de-cluttering and without any documentation, but it works just as well.


Writing this documentation takes time and significant amounts of espresso coffee. Do you like this blog? Give the editor a coffee by clicking on the cup.

[Dec 28, 2020] Red Hat interpretation of CenOS8 fiasco

Highly recommended!
" People are complaining because you are suddenly killing CentOS 8 which has been released last year with the promise of binary compatibility to RHEL 8 and security updates until 2029."
One of immanent features of GPL is that it allow clones to exist. Which means the Oracle Linix, or Rocky Linux, or Lenin Linux will simply take CentOS place and Red hat will be in disadvantage, now unable to control the clone to the extent they managed to co-opt and control CentOS. "Embrace and extinguish" change i now will hand on Red Hat and probably will continue to hand for years from now. That may not be what Redhat brass wanted: reputational damage with zero of narrative effect on the revenue stream. I suppose the majority of CentOS community will finally migrate to emerging RHEL clones. If that was the Red Hat / IBM goal - well, they will reach it.
Notable quotes:
"... availability gap ..."
"... Another long-winded post that doesn't address the single, core issue that no one will speak to directly: why can't CentOS Stream and CentOS _both_ exist? Because in absence of any official response from Red Hat, the assumption is obvious: to drive RHEL sales. If that's the reason, then say it. Stop being cowards about it. ..."
"... We might be better off if Red Hat hadn't gotten involved in CentOS in the first place and left it an independent project. THEY choose to pursue this path and THEY chose to renege on assurances made around the non-stream distro. Now they're going to choose to deal with whatever consequences come from the loss of goodwill in the community. ..."
"... If the problem was in money, all RH needed to do was to ask the community. You would have been amazed at the output. ..."
"... You've alienated a few hunderd thousand sysadmins that started upgrading to 8 this year and you've thrown the scientific Linux community under a bus. You do realize Scientific Linux was discontinued because CERN and FermiLab decided to standardize on CentOS 8? This trickled down to a load of labs and research institutions. ..."
"... Nobody forced you to buy out CentOS or offer a gratis distribution. But everybody expected you to stick to the EOL dates you committed to. You boast about being the "Enterprise" Linux distributor. Then, don't act like a freaking start-up that announces stuff today and vanishes a year later. ..."
"... They should have announced this at the START of CentOS 8.0. Instead they started CentOS 8 with the belief it was going to be like CentOS7 have a long supported life cycle. ..."
"... IBM/RH/CentOS keeps replaying the same talking points over and over and ignoring the actual issues people have ..."
"... What a piece of stinking BS. What is this "gap" you're talking about? Nobody in the CentOS community cares about this pre-RHEL gap. You're trying to fix something that isn't broken. And doing that the most horrible and bizzarre way imaginable. ..."
"... As I understand it, Fedora - RHEL - CENTOS just becomes Fedora - Centos Stream - RHEL. Why just call them RH-Alpha, RH-Beta, RH? ..."
Dec 28, 2020 | blog.centos.org

Let's go back to 2003 where Red Hat saw the opportunity to make a fundamental change to become an enterprise software company with an open source development methodology.

To do so Red Hat made a hard decision and in 2003 split Red Hat Linux into Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) and Fedora Linux. RHEL was the occasional snapshot of Fedora Linux that was a product -- slowed, stabilized, and paced for production. Fedora Linux and the Project around it were the open source community for innovating -- speedier, prone to change, and paced for exploration. This solved the problem of trying to hold to two, incompatible core values (fast/slow) in a single project. After that, each distribution flourished within its intended audiences.

But that split left two important gaps. On the project/community side, people still wanted an OS that strived to be slower-moving, stable-enough, and free of cost -- an availability gap . On the product/customer side, there was an openness gap -- RHEL users (and consequently all rebuild users) couldn't contribute easily to RHEL. The rebuilds arose and addressed the availability gap, but they were closed to contributions to the core Linux distro itself.

In 2012, Red Hat's move toward offering products beyond the operating system resulted in a need for an easy-to-access platform for open source development of the upstream projects -- such as Gluster, oVirt, and RDO -- that these products are derived from. At that time, the pace of innovation in Fedora made it not an easy platform to work with; for example, the pace of kernel updates in Fedora led to breakage in these layered projects.

We formed a team I led at Red Hat to go about solving this problem, and, after approaching and discussing it with the CentOS Project core team, Red Hat and the CentOS Project agreed to " join forces ." We said joining forces because there was no company to acquire, so we hired members of the core team and began expanding CentOS beyond being just a rebuild project. That included investing in the infrastructure and protecting the brand. The goal was to evolve into a project that also enabled things to be built on top of it, and a project that would be exponentially more open to contribution than ever before -- a partial solution to the openness gap.

Bringing home the CentOS Linux users, folks who were stuck in that availability gap, closer into the Red Hat family was a wonderful side effect of this plan. My experience going from participant to active open source contributor began in 2003, after the birth of the Fedora Project. At that time, as a highly empathetic person I found it challenging to handle the ongoing emotional waves from the Red Hat Linux split. Many of my long time community friends themselves were affected. As a company, we didn't know if RHEL or Fedora Linux were going to work out. We had made a hard decision and were navigating the waters from the aftershock. Since then we've all learned a lot, including the more difficult dynamics of an open source development methodology. So to me, bringing the CentOS and other rebuild communities into an actual relationship with Red Hat again was wonderful to see, experience, and help bring about.

Over the past six years since finally joining forces, we made good progress on those goals. We started Special Interest Groups (SIGs) to manage the layered project experience, such as the Storage SIG, Virt Sig, and Cloud SIG. We created a governance structure where there hadn't been one before. We brought RHEL source code to be housed at git.centos.org . We designed and built out a significant public build infrastructure and CI/CD system in a project that had previously been sealed-boxes all the way down.


cmdrlinux says: December 19, 2020 at 2:36 pm

"This brings us to today and the current chapter we are living in right now. The move to shift focus of the project to CentOS Stream is about filling that openness gap in some key ways. Essentially, Red Hat is filling the development and contribution gap that exists between Fedora and RHEL by shifting the place of CentOS from just downstream of RHEL to just upstream of RHEL."

Another long-winded post that doesn't address the single, core issue that no one will speak to directly: why can't CentOS Stream and CentOS _both_ exist? Because in absence of any official response from Red Hat, the assumption is obvious: to drive RHEL sales. If that's the reason, then say it. Stop being cowards about it.

Mark Danon says: December 19, 2020 at 4:14 pm

Redhat has no obligation to maintain both CentOS 8 and CentOS stream. Heck, they have no obligation to maintain CentOS either. Maintaining both will only increase the workload of CentOS maintainers. I don't suppose you are volunteering to help them do the work? Be thankful for a distribution that you have been using so far, and move on.

Dave says: December 20, 2020 at 7:16 am

We might be better off if Red Hat hadn't gotten involved in CentOS in the first place and left it an independent project. THEY choose to pursue this path and THEY chose to renege on assurances made around the non-stream distro. Now they're going to choose to deal with whatever consequences come from the loss of goodwill in the community.

If they were going to pull this stunt they shouldn't have gone ahead with CentOS 8 at all and fulfilled any lifecycle expectations for CentOS 7.

Konstantin says: December 21, 2020 at 12:24 am

Sorry, but that's a BS. CentOS Stream and CentOS Linux are not mutually replaceable. You cannot sell that BS to any people actually knowing the intrinsics of how CentOS Linux was being developed.

If the problem was in money, all RH needed to do was to ask the community. You would have been amazed at the output.

No, it is just a primitive, direct and lame way to either force "free users" to either pay, or become your free-to-use beta testers (CentOS Stream *is* beta, whatever you say).

I predict you will be somewhat amazed at the actual results.

Not talking about the breach of trust. Now how much would cost all your (RH's) further promises and assurances?

Chris Mair says: December 20, 2020 at 3:21 pm

To: centos-devel@centos.org
To: centos-questions@redhat.com

Hi,

Re: https://blog.centos.org/2020/12/balancing-the-needs-around-the-centos-platform/

you can spin this to the moon and back. The fact remains you just killed CentOS Linux and your users' trust by moving the EOL of CentOS Linux 8 from 2029 to 2021.

You've alienated a few hunderd thousand sysadmins that started upgrading to 8 this year and you've thrown the scientific Linux community under a bus. You do realize Scientific Linux was discontinued because CERN and FermiLab decided to standardize on CentOS 8? This trickled down to a load of labs and research institutions.

Nobody forced you to buy out CentOS or offer a gratis distribution. But everybody expected you to stick to the EOL dates you committed to. You boast about being the "Enterprise" Linux distributor. Then, don't act like a freaking start-up that announces stuff today and vanishes a year later.

The correct way to handle this would have been to kill the future CentOS 9, giving everybody the time to cope with the changes.

I've earned my RHCE in 2003 (yes that's seventeen years ago). Since then, many times, I've recommended RHEL or CentOS to the clients I do free lance work for. Just a few weeks ago I was asked to give an opinion on six CentOS 7 boxes about to be deployed into a research system to be upgraded to 8. I gave my go. Well, that didn't last long.

What do you expect me to recommend now? Buying RHEL licenses? That may or may be not have a certain cost per year and may or may be not supported until a given date? Once you grant yourself the freedom to retract whatever published information, how can I trust you? What added values do I get over any of the community supported distributions (given I can support myself)?

And no, CentOS Stream cannot "cover 95% (or so) of current user workloads". Stream was introduces as "a rolling preview of what's next in RHEL".

I'm not interested at all in a "a rolling preview of what's next in RHEL". I'm interested in a stable distribution I can trust to get updates until the given EOL date.

You've made me look elsewhere for that.

-- Chris

Chip says: December 20, 2020 at 6:16 pm

I guess my biggest issue is They should have announced this at the START of CentOS 8.0. Instead they started CentOS 8 with the belief it was going to be like CentOS7 have a long supported life cycle. What they did was basically bait and switch. Not cool. Especially not cool for those running multiple nodes on high performance computing clusters.

Alex says: December 21, 2020 at 12:51 am

I have over 300,000 Centos nodes that require Long term support as it's impossible to turn them over rapidly. I also have 154,000 RHEL nodes. I now have to migrate 454,000 nodes over to Ubuntu because Redhat just made the dumbest decision short of letting IBM acquire them I've seen. Whitehurst how could you let this happen? Nothing like millions in lost revenue from a single customer.

Nika jous says: December 21, 2020 at 1:43 pm

Just migrated to OpenSUSE. Rather than crying for dead os it's better to act yourself. Redhat is a sinking ship it probably want last next decade.Legendary failure like ibm never have upper hand in Linux world. It's too competitive now. Customers have more options to choose. I think person who have take this decision probably ignorant about the current market or a top grade fool.

Ang says: December 22, 2020 at 2:36 am

IBM/RH/CentOS keeps replaying the same talking points over and over and ignoring the actual issues people have. You say you are reading them, but choose to ignore it and that is even worse!

People still don't understand why CentOS stream and CentOS can't co-exist. If your goal was not to support CentOS 8, why did you put 2029 date or why did you even release CentOS 8 in the first place?

Hell, you could have at least had the goodwill with the community to make CentOS 8 last until end of CentOS 7! But no, you discontinued CentOS 8 giving people only 1 year to respond, and timed it right after EOL of CentOS6.

Why didn't you even bother asking the community first and come to a compromise or something?

Again, not a single person had a problem with CentOS stream, the problem was having the rug pulled under their feet! So stop pretending and address it properly!

Even worse, you knew this was an issue, it's like literally #1 on your issue list "Shift Board to be more transparent in support of becoming a contributor-focused open source project"

And you FAILED! Where was the transparency?!

Ang says: December 22, 2020 at 2:36 am

A link to the issue: https://git.centos.org/centos/board/issue/1

AP says: December 22, 2020 at 6:55 am

What a piece of stinking BS. What is this "gap" you're talking about? Nobody in the CentOS community cares about this pre-RHEL gap. You're trying to fix something that isn't broken. And doing that the most horrible and bizzarre way imaginable.

Len Inkster says: December 22, 2020 at 4:13 pm

As I understand it, Fedora - RHEL - CENTOS just becomes Fedora - Centos Stream - RHEL. Why just call them RH-Alpha, RH-Beta, RH?

Anyone who wants to continue with CENTOS? Fork the project and maintain it yourselves. That how we got to CENTOS from Linus Torvalds original Linux.

Peter says: December 22, 2020 at 5:36 pm

I can only comment this as disappointment, if not betrayal, to whole CentOS user base. This decision was clearly done, without considering impact to majority of CentOS community use cases.

If you need upstream contributions channel for RHEL, create it, do not destroy the stable downstream. Clear and simple. All other 'explanations' are cover ups for real purpose of this action.

This stinks of politics within IBM/RH meddling with CentOS. I hope, Rocky will bring the desired stability, that community was relying on with CentOS.

Goodbye CentOS, it was nice 15 years.

Ken Sanderson says: December 23, 2020 at 1:57 pm

We've just agreed to cancel out RHEL subscriptions and will be moving them and our Centos boxes away as well. It was a nice run but while it will be painful, it is a chance to move far far away from the terrible decisions made here.

[Dec 28, 2020] Red Hat Goes Full IBM and Says Farewell to CentOS - ServeTheHome

Dec 28, 2020 | www.servethehome.com

The intellectually easy answer to what is happening is that IBM is putting pressure on Red Hat to hit bigger numbers in the future. Red Hat sees a captive audience in its CentOS userbase and is looking to covert a percentage to paying customers. Everyone else can go to Ubuntu or elsewhere if they do not want to pay...

[Dec 28, 2020] Call our sales people and open your wallet if you use CentOS in prod

Dec 28, 2020 | freedomben.medium.com

It seemed obvious (via Occam's Razor) that CentOS had cannibalized RHEL sales for the last time and was being put out to die. Statements like:

If you are using CentOS Linux 8 in a production environment, and are
concerned that CentOS Stream will not meet your needs, we encourage you
to contact Red Hat about options.

That line sure seemed like horrific marketing speak for "call our sales people and open your wallet if you use CentOS in prod." ( cue evil mustache-stroking capitalist villain ).

... CentOS will no longer be downstream of RHEL as it was previously. CentOS will now be upstream of the next RHEL minor release .

... ... ...

I'm watching Rocky Linux closely myself. While I plan to use CentOS for the vast majority of my needs, Rocky Linux may have a place in my life as well, as an example powering my home router. Generally speaking, I want my router to be as boring as absolute possible. That said even that may not stay true forever, if for example CentOS gets good WireGuard support.

Lastly, but certainly not least, Red Hat has talked about upcoming low/no-cost RHEL options. Keep an eye out for those! I have no idea the details, but if you currently use CentOS for personal use, I am optimistic that there may be a way to get RHEL for free coming soon. Again, this is just my speculation (I have zero knowledge of this beyond what has been shared publicly), but I'm personally excited.

[Dec 27, 2020] Red Hat expects you to call their sales people and open your wallet if you use CentOS in production. That will not happen.

Dec 27, 2020 | freedomben.medium.com

It seemed obvious (via Occam's Razor) that CentOS had cannibalized RHEL sales for the last time and was being put out to die. Statements like:

If you are using CentOS Linux 8 in a production environment, and are
concerned that CentOS Stream will not meet your needs, we encourage you
to contact Red Hat about options.

That line sure seemed like horrific marketing speak for "call our sales people and open your wallet if you use CentOS in prod." ( cue evil mustache-stroking capitalist villain ).

... CentOS will no longer be downstream of RHEL as it was previously. CentOS will now be upstream of the next RHEL minor release .

... ... ...

I'm watching Rocky Linux closely myself. While I plan to use CentOS for the vast majority of my needs, Rocky Linux may have a place in my life as well, as an example powering my home router. Generally speaking, I want my router to be as boring as absolute possible. That said even that may not stay true forever, if for example CentOS gets good WireGuard support.

Lastly, but certainly not least, Red Hat has talked about upcoming low/no-cost RHEL options. Keep an eye out for those! I have no idea the details, but if you currently use CentOS for personal use, I am optimistic that there may be a way to get RHEL for free coming soon. Again, this is just my speculation (I have zero knowledge of this beyond what has been shared publicly), but I'm personally excited.

[Dec 27, 2020] Why Red Hat dumped CentOS for CentOS Stream by Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols

Red hat always has uneasy relationship with CentOS. Red hat brass always viwed it as something that streal Red hat licences. So "Stop thesteal" mve might be not IBM inspired but it is firmly in IBM tradition. And like many similar IBM moves it will backfire.
This hiring of CentOS developers in 2014 gave them unprecedented control over the project. Why on Earth they now want independent projects like Rocly Linux to re-emerge to fill the vacuum. They can't avoid the side affect of using GPL -- it allows clones. .Why it is better to have a project that are hostile to Red Hat and that "in-house" domesticated project is unclear to me. As many large enterprises deploy mix of Red Hat and CentOS the initial reaction might in the opposite direction the Red Hat brass expected: they will get less licesses, not more by adopting "One IBM way"
Dec 21, 2020 | www.zdnet.com

On Hacker News , the leading comment was: "Imagine if you were running a business, and deployed CentOS 8 based on the 10-year lifespan promise . You're totally screwed now, and Red Hat knows it. Why on earth didn't they make this switch starting with CentOS 9???? Let's not sugar coat this. They've betrayed us."

Over at Reddit/Linux , another person snarled, "We based our Open Source project on the latest CentOS releases since CentOS 4. Our flagship product is running on CentOS 8 and we *sure* did bet the farm on the promised EOL of 31st May 2029."

A popular tweet from The Best Linux Blog In the Unixverse, nixcraft , an account with over 200-thousand subscribers, went: Oracle buys Sun: Solaris Unix, Sun servers/workstation, and MySQL went to /dev/null. IBM buys Red Hat: CentOS is going to >/dev/null . Note to self: If a big vendor such as Oracle, IBM, MS, and others buys your fav software, start the migration procedure ASAP."

Many others joined in this choir of annoyed CentOS users that it was IBM's fault that their favorite Linux was being taken away from them. Still, others screamed Red Hat was betraying open-source itself.

... ... ...

Still another ex-Red Hat official said. If it wasn't for CentOS, Red Hat would have been a 10-billion dollar company before Red Hat became a billion-dollar business .

... ... ...

[Dec 27, 2020] There are now countless Internet servers out there that run CentOS. This is why the Debian project is so important.

Dec 27, 2020 | freedomben.medium.com

There are companies that sell appliances based on CentOS. Websense/Forcepoint is one of them. The Websense appliance runs the base OS of CentOS, on top of which runs their Web-filtering application. Same with RSA. Their NetWitness SIEM runs on top of CentOS.

Likewise, there are now countless Internet servers out there that run CentOS. There's now a huge user base of CentOS out there.

This is why the Debian project is so important. I will be converting everything that is currently CentOS to Debian. Those who want to use the Ubuntu fork of Debian, that is also probably a good idea.

[Dec 23, 2020] Red Hat and GPL: uneasy romance ended long ego, but Red Hat still depends on GPL as it does not develop many components and gets them for free from the community and other vendors

It all about money and about executive bonuses: shortsighted executive want more and more money as if the current huge revenue is not enough...
Dec 23, 2020 | www.zdnet.com

former Red Hat executive confided, "CentOS was gutting sales. The customer perception was 'it's from Red Hat and it's a clone of RHEL, so it's good to go!' It's not. It's a second-rate copy." From where, this person sits, "This is 100% defensive to stave off more losses to CentOS."

Still another ex-Red Hat official said. If it wasn't for CentOS, Red Hat would have been a 10-billion dollar company before Red Hat became a billion-dollar business .

Yet another Red Hat staffer snapped, "Look at the CentOS FAQ . It says right there:

CentOS Linux is NOT supported in any way by Red Hat, Inc.

CentOS Linux is NOT Red Hat Linux, it is NOT Fedora Linux. It is NOT Red Hat Enterprise Linux. It is NOT RHEL. CentOS Linux does NOT contain Red Hat® Linux, Fedora, or Red Hat® Enterprise Linux.

CentOS Linux is NOT a clone of Red Hat® Enterprise Linux.

CentOS Linux is built from publicly available source code provided by Red Hat, Inc for Red Hat Enterprise Linux in a completely different (CentOS Project maintained) build system.

We don't owe you anything."

[Dec 23, 2020] Where do I go now that CentOS Linux is gone

Dec 23, 2020 | arstechnica.com

... ... ...

CloudLinux OS is a RHEL rebuild distro designed for shared hosting providers. CloudLinux OS itself probably isn't the free replacement for CentOS anyone is looking for -- it's more akin to RHEL itself, with subscription fees necessary for production use.

However, the CloudLinux OS maintainers have announced that they'll be releasing a 1:1 replacement for CentOS in Q1 2021. The new fork will be a "separate, totally free OS that is fully compatible with RHEL 8 and future versions."

There are a few upsides to this upcoming fork. CloudLinux OS has been around for a while, and it has a pretty solid reputation. The new fork they're announcing won't be a big challenge for Cloud -- they're already forking RHEL regularly and tracking changes to maintain the full CloudLinux OS.

All they really need to do is make certain they separate out their own branding and additional, license-only premium features.

This should also be a very easy upgrade for CentOS 8 users -- there's already a very easy one-script migration path from CentOS to the full CloudLinux OS. Converting from CentOS to "the new fork" should be just as simple and without the registration step necessary for the full Cloud Linux.

[Dec 10, 2020] Here's a hot tip for the IBM geniuses that came up with this. Rebrand CentOS as New Coke, and you've got yourself a real winner.

Dec 10, 2020 | blog.centos.org

Ward Mundy says: December 9, 2020 at 3:12 am

Happy to report that we've invested exactly one day in CentOS 7 to CentOS 8 migration. Thanks, IBM. Now we can turn our full attention to Debian and never look back.

Here's a hot tip for the IBM geniuses that came up with this. Rebrand CentOS as New Coke, and you've got yourself a real winner.

[Dec 10, 2020] Does Oracle Linux have staying power against Red Hat

Notable quotes:
"... If you need official support, Oracle support is generally cheaper than RedHat. ..."
"... You can legally run OL free and have access to patches/repositories. ..."
"... Full binary compatibility with RedHat so if anything is certified to run on RedHat, it automatically certified for Oracle Linux as well. ..."
"... Premium OL subscription includes a few nice bonuses like DTrace and Ksplice. ..."
"... Forgot to mention that converting RedHat Linux to Oracle is very straightforward - just matter of updating yum/dnf config to point it to Oracle repositories. Not sure if you can do it with CentOS (maybe possible, just never needed to convert CentOS to Oracle). ..."
Dec 10, 2020 | blog.centos.org

Matthew Stier says: December 8, 2020 at 8:11 pm

My office switched the bulk of our RHEL to OL years ago, and find it a great product, and great support, and only needing to get support for systems we actually want support on.

Oracle provided scripts to convert EL5, EL6, and EL7 systems, and was able to convert some EL4 systems I still have running. (Its a matter of going through the list of installed packages, use 'rpm -e --justdb' to remove the package from the rpmdb, and re-installing the package (without dependencies) from the OL ISO.)

art_ok 1 point· 5 minutes ago

We have been using Oracle Linux exclusively last 5-6 years for everything - thousands of servers both for internal use and hundred or so customers.

Not a single time regretted, had any issues or were tempted to move to RedHat let alone CentOS.

I found Oracle Linux has several advantages over RedHat/CentOS:

If you need official support, Oracle support is generally cheaper than RedHat. You can legally run OL free and have access to patches/repositories. Full binary compatibility with RedHat so if anything is certified to run on RedHat, it automatically certified for Oracle Linux as well. It is very easy to switch between supported and free setup (say, you have proof-of-concept setup running free OL, but then it is being promoted to production status - just matter of registering box with Oracle, no need to reinstall/reconfigure anything). You can easily move licensed/support from one box to another so you always run the same OS and do not have to think and decide (RedHat for production / CentOS for Dec/test). You have a choice to run good old RedHat kernel or use newer Oracle kernel (which is pretty much vanilla kernel with minimal modification - just newer). We generally run Oracle kernels on all boxes unless we have to support particularly pedantic customer who insist on using old RedHat kernel. Premium OL subscription includes a few nice bonuses like DTrace and Ksplice.

Overall, it is pleasure to work and support OL.

Negatives:

I found RedHat knowledge base / documentation is much better than Oracle's Oracle does not offer extensive support for "advanced" products like JBoss, Directory Server, etc. Obviously Oracle has its own equivalent commercial offerings (Weblogic, etc) and prefers customers to use them. Some complain about quality of Oracle's support. Can't really comment on that. Had no much exposure to RedHat support, maybe used it couple of times and it was good. Oracle support can be slower, but in most cases it is good/sufficient. Actually over the last few years support quality for Linux has improved noticeably - guess Oracle pushes their cloud very aggressively and as a result invests in Linux support (as Oracle cloud aka OCI runs on Oracle Linux).
art_ok 1 point· just now

Forgot to mention that converting RedHat Linux to Oracle is very straightforward - just matter of updating yum/dnf config to point it to Oracle repositories. Not sure if you can do it with CentOS (maybe possible, just never needed to convert CentOS to Oracle).

[Dec 10, 2020] Backlash against Red Hat management started

At the end IBM/Red Hat might even lose money as powerful organizations, such as universities, might abandon Red Hat as the platform. Or may be not. Red Hat managed to push systemd down the throat without any major hit to the revenue. Why not to repeat the trick with CentOS? In any case IBM owns enterprise Linux and bitter complains and threats of retribution in this forum is just a symptom that the development now is completely driven by corporate brass, and all key decisions belong to them.
Community wise, this is plain bad news for Open Source and all Open Source communities. IBM explained to them very clearly: you does not matter. And organized minority always beat disorganized majority. Actually most large organizations will probably stick with Red Hat compatible OS, probably moving to Oracle Linux or Rocky Linux, is it materialize, not to Debian.
What is interesting is that most people here believe that when security patches are stopped that's the end of the life for the particular Linux version. It is an interesting superstition and it shows how conditioned by corporations Linux folk are and how far from BSD folk they are actually are. Security is an architectural thing first and foremost. Patched are just band aid and they can't change general security situation in Linux no matter how hard anyone tries. But they now serve as a powerful tool of corporate mind control over the user population. Feat is a powerful instrument of mind control.
In reality security of most systems on internal network does no change one bit with patches. And on external network only applications that have open ports that matter (that's why ssh should be restricted to the subnets used, not to be opened to the whole world)
Notable quotes:
"... Bad idea. The whole point of using CentOS is it's an exact binary-compatible rebuild of RHEL. With this decision RH is killing CentOS and inviting to create a new *fork* or use another distribution ..."
"... We all knew from the moment IBM bought Redhat that we were on borrowed time. IBM will do everything they can to push people to RHEL even if that includes destroying a great community project like CentOS. ..."
"... First CoreOS, now CentOS. It's about time to switch to one of the *BSDs. ..."
"... I guess that means the tens of thousands of cores of research compute I manage at a large University will be migrating to Debian. ..."
"... IBM is declining, hence they need more profit from "useless" product line. So disgusting ..."
"... An entire team worked for months on a centos8 transition at the uni I work at. I assume a small portion can be salvaged but reading this it seems most of it will simply go out the window ..."
"... Unless the community can center on a new single proper fork of RHEL, it makes the most sense (to me) to seek refuge in Debian as it is quite close to CentOS in stability terms. ..."
"... Another one bites the dust due to corporate greed, which IBM exemplifies ..."
"... More likely to drive people entirely out of the RHEL ecosystem. ..."
"... Don't trust Red Hat. 1 year ago Red Hat's CTO Chris Wright agreed in an interview: 'Old school CentOS isn't going anywhere. Stream is available in parallel with the existing CentOS builds. In other words, "nothing changes for current users of CentOS."' https://www.zdnet.com/article/red-hat-introduces-rolling-release-centos-stream/ ..."
"... 'To be exact, CentOS Stream is an upstream development platform for ecosystem developers. It will be updated several times a day. This is not a production operating system. It's purely a developer's distro.' ..."
"... Read again: CentOS Stream is not a production operating system. 'Nuff said. ..."
"... This makes my decision to go with Ansible and CentOS 8 in our enterprise simple. Nope, time to got with Puppet or Chef. ..."
"... Ironic, and it puts those of us who have recently migrated many of our development serves to CentOS8 in a really bad spot. Luckily we haven't licensed RHEL8 production servers yet -- and now that's never going to happen. ..."
"... What IBM fails to understand is that many of us who use CentOS for personal projects also work for corporations that spend millions of dollars annually on products from companies like IBM and have great influence over what vendors are chosen. This is a pure betrayal of the community. Expect nothing less from IBM. ..."
"... IBM is cashing in on its Red Hat acquisition by attempting to squeeze extra licenses from its customers.. ..."
"... Hoping that stabbing Open Source community in the back, will make it switch to commercial licenses is absolutely preposterous. This shows how disconnected they're from reality and consumed by greed and it will simply backfire on them, when we switch to Debian or any other LTS alternative. ..."
"... Centos was handy for education and training purposes and production when you couldn't afford the fees for "support", now it will just be a shadow of Fedora. ..."
"... There was always a conflict of interest associated with Redhat managing the Centos project and this is the end result of this conflict of interest. ..."
"... The reality is that someone will repackage Redhat and make it just like Centos. The only difference is that Redhat now live in the same camp as Oracle. ..."
"... Everyone predicted this when redhat bought centos. And when IBM bought RedHat it cemented everyone's notion. ..."
"... I am senior system admin in my organization which spends millions dollar a year on RH&IBM products. From tomorrow, I will do my best to convince management to minimize our spending on RH & IBM ..."
"... IBM are seeing every CentOS install as a missed RHEL subscription... ..."
"... Some years ago IBM bought Informix. We switched to PostgreSQL, when Informix was IBMized. One year ago IBM bought Red Hat and CentOS. CentOS is now IBMized. Guess what will happen with our CentOS installations. What's wrong with IBM? ..."
"... Remember when RedHat, around RH-7.x, wanted to charge for the distro, the community revolted so much that RedHat saw their mistake and released Fedora. You can fool all the people some of the time, and some of the people all the time, but you cannot fool all the people all the time. ..."
"... As I predicted, RHEL is destroying CentOS, and IBM is running Red Hat into the ground in the name of profit$. Why is anyone surprised? I give Red Hat 12-18 months of life, before they become another ordinary dept of IBM, producing IBM Linux. ..."
"... Happy to donate and be part of the revolution away the Corporate vampire Squid that is IBM ..."
"... Red Hat's word now means nothing to me. Disagreements over future plans and technical direction are one thing, but you *lied* to us about CentOS 8's support cycle, to the detriment of *everybody*. You cost us real money relying on a promise you made, we thought, in good faith. ..."
Dec 10, 2020 | blog.centos.org

Internet User says: December 8, 2020 at 5:13 pm

This is a pretty clear indication that you people are completely out of touch with your users.

Joel B. D. says: December 8, 2020 at 5:17 pm

Bad idea. The whole point of using CentOS is it's an exact binary-compatible rebuild of RHEL. With this decision RH is killing CentOS and inviting to create a new *fork* or use another distribution. Do you realize how much market share you will be losing and how much chaos you will be creating with this?

"If you are using CentOS Linux 8 in a production environment, and are concerned that CentOS Stream will not meet your needs, we encourage you to contact Red Hat about options". So this is the way RH is telling us they don't want anyone to use CentOS anymore and switch to RHEL?

Michael says: December 8, 2020 at 8:31 pm

That's exactly what they're saying. We all knew from the moment IBM bought Redhat that we were on borrowed time. IBM will do everything they can to push people to RHEL even if that includes destroying a great community project like CentOS.

OS says: December 8, 2020 at 6:20 pm

First CoreOS, now CentOS. It's about time to switch to one of the *BSDs.

JD says: December 8, 2020 at 6:35 pm

Wow. Well, I guess that means the tens of thousands of cores of research compute I manage at a large University will be migrating to Debian. I've just started preparing to shift from Scientific Linux 7 to CentOS due to SL being discontinued by 2024. Glad I've only just started - not much work to throw away.

ShameOnIBM says: December 8, 2020 at 7:07 pm

IBM is declining, hence they need more profit from "useless" product line. So disgusting

MLF says: December 8, 2020 at 7:15 pm

An entire team worked for months on a centos8 transition at the uni I work at. I assume a small portion can be salvaged but reading this it seems most of it will simply go out the window. Does anyone know if this decision of dumping centos8 is final?

MM says: December 8, 2020 at 7:28 pm

Unless the community can center on a new single proper fork of RHEL, it makes the most sense (to me) to seek refuge in Debian as it is quite close to CentOS in stability terms.

Already existing functioning distribution ecosystem, can probably do good with influx of resources to enhance the missing bits, such as further improving SELinux support and expanding Debian security team.

I say this without any official or unofficial involvement with the Debian project, other than being a user.

And we have just launched hundred of Centos 8 servers.

Faisal Sehbai says: December 8, 2020 at 7:32 pm

Another one bites the dust due to corporate greed, which IBM exemplifies. This is why I shuddered when they bought RH. There is nothing that IBM touches that gets better, other than the bottom line of their suits!

Disgusting!

William Smith says: December 8, 2020 at 7:39 pm

This is a big mistake. RedHat did this with RedHat Linux 9 the market leading Linux and created Fedora, now an also-ran to Ubuntu. I spent a lot of time during Covid to convert from earlier versions to 8, and now will have to review that work with my customer.

Daniele Brunengo says: December 8, 2020 at 7:48 pm

I just finished building a CentOS 8 web server, worked out all the nooks and crannies and was very satisfied with the result. Now I have to do everything from scratch? The reason why I chose this release was that every website and its brother were giving a 2029 EOL. Changing that is the worst betrayal of trust possible for the CentOS community. It's unbelievable.

David Potterveld says: December 8, 2020 at 8:08 pm

What a colossal blunder: a pivot from the long-standing mission of an OS providing stability, to an unstable development platform, in a manner that betrays its current users. They should remove the "C" from CentOS because it no longer has any connection to a community effort. I wonder if this is a move calculated to drive people from a free near clone of RHEL to a paid RHEL subscription? More likely to drive people entirely out of the RHEL ecosystem.

a says: December 8, 2020 at 9:08 pm

From a RHEL perspective I understand why they'd want it this way. CentOS was probably cutting deep into potential RedHat license sales. Though why or how RedHat would have a say in how CentOS is being run in the first place is.. troubling.

From a CentOS perspective you may as well just take the project out back and close it now. If people wanted to run beta-test tier RHEL they'd run Fedora. "LATER SECURITY FIXES AND UNTESTED 'FEATURES'?! SIGN ME UP!" -nobody

I'll probably run CentOS 7 until the end and then swap over to Debian when support starts hurting me. What a pain.

Ralf says: December 8, 2020 at 9:08 pm

Don't trust Red Hat. 1 year ago Red Hat's CTO Chris Wright agreed in an interview: 'Old school CentOS isn't going anywhere. Stream is available in parallel with the existing CentOS builds. In other words, "nothing changes for current users of CentOS."' https://www.zdnet.com/article/red-hat-introduces-rolling-release-centos-stream/

I'm a current user of old school CentOS, so keep your promise, Mr CTO.

Tamas says: December 8, 2020 at 10:01 pm

That was quick: "Old school CentOS isn't going anywhere. Stream is available in parallel with the existing CentOS builds. In other words, "nothing changes for current users of CentOS."

https://www.zdnet.com/article/red-hat-introduces-rolling-release-centos-stream/

Konstantin says: December 9, 2020 at 3:36 pm

From the same article: 'To be exact, CentOS Stream is an upstream development platform for ecosystem developers. It will be updated several times a day. This is not a production operating system. It's purely a developer's distro.'

Read again: CentOS Stream is not a production operating system. 'Nuff said.

Samuel C. says: December 8, 2020 at 10:53 pm

This makes my decision to go with Ansible and CentOS 8 in our enterprise simple. Nope, time to got with Puppet or Chef. IBM did what I thought they would screw up Red Hat. My company is dumping IBM software everywhere - this means we need to dump CentOS now too.

Brendan says: December 9, 2020 at 12:15 am

Ironic, and it puts those of us who have recently migrated many of our development serves to CentOS8 in a really bad spot. Luckily we haven't licensed RHEL8 production servers yet -- and now that's never going to happen.

vinci says: December 8, 2020 at 11:45 pm

I can't believe what IBM is actually doing. This is a direct move against all that open source means. They want to do exactly the same thing they're doing with awx (vs. ansible tower). You're going against everything that stands for open source. And on top of that you choose to stop offering support for Centos 8, all of a sudden! What a horrid move on your part. This only reliable choice that remains is probably going to be Debian/Ubuntu. What a waste...

Peter Vonway says: December 8, 2020 at 11:56 pm

What IBM fails to understand is that many of us who use CentOS for personal projects also work for corporations that spend millions of dollars annually on products from companies like IBM and have great influence over what vendors are chosen. This is a pure betrayal of the community. Expect nothing less from IBM.

Scott says: December 9, 2020 at 8:38 am

This is exactly it. IBM is cashing in on its Red Hat acquisition by attempting to squeeze extra licenses from its customers.. while not taking into account the fact that Red Hat's strong adoption into the enterprise is a direct consequence of engineers using the nonproprietary version to develop things at home in their spare time.

Having an open source, non support contract version of your OS is exactly what drives adoption towards the supported version once the business decides to put something into production.

They are choosing to kill the golden goose in order to get the next few eggs faster. IBM doesn't care about anything but its large enterprise customers. Very stereotypically IBM.

OSLover says: December 9, 2020 at 12:09 am

So sad. Not only breaking the support promise but so quickly (2021!)

Business wise, a lot of business software is providing CentOS packages and support. Like hosting panels, backup software, virtualization, Management. I mean A LOT of money worldwide is in dark waters now with this announcement. It took years for CentOS to appear in their supported and tested distros. It will disappear now much faster.

Community wise, this is plain bad news for Open Source and all Open Source communities. This is sad. I wonder, are open source developers nowadays happy to spend so many hours for something that will in the end benefit IBM "subscribers" only in the end? I don't think they are.

What a sad way to end 2020.

technick says: December 9, 2020 at 12:09 am

I don't want to give up on CentOS but this is a strong life changing decision. My background is linux engineering with over 15+ years of hardcore experience. CentOS has always been my go to when an organization didn't have the appetite for RHEL and the $75 a year license fee per instance. I fought off Ubuntu take overs at 2 of the last 3 organizations I've been with successfully. I can't, won't fight off any more and start advocating for Ubuntu or pure Debian moving forward.

RIP CentOS. Red Hat killed a great project. I wonder if Anisble will be next?

ConcernedAdmin says: December 9, 2020 at 12:47 am

Hoping that stabbing Open Source community in the back, will make it switch to commercial licenses is absolutely preposterous. This shows how disconnected they're from reality and consumed by greed and it will simply backfire on them, when we switch to Debian or any other LTS alternative. I can't think moving everything I so caressed and loved to a mess like Ubuntu.

John says: December 9, 2020 at 1:32 am

Assinine. This is completely ridiculous. I have migrated several servers from CentOS 7 to 8 recently with more to go. We also have a RHEL subscription for outward facing servers, CentOS internal. This type of change should absolutely have been announced for CentOS 9. This is garbage saying 1 year from now when it was supposed to be till 2029. A complete betrayal. One year to move everything??? Stupid.

Now I'm going to be looking at a couple of other options but it won't be RHEL after this type of move. This has destroyed my trust in RHEL as I'm sure IBM pushed for this. You will be losing my RHEL money once I chose and migrate. I get companies exist to make money and that's fine. This though is purely a naked money grab that betrays an established timeline and is about to force massive work on lots of people in a tiny timeframe saying "f you customers.". You will no longer get my money for doing that to me

Concerned Fren says: December 9, 2020 at 1:52 am

In hind sight it's clear to see that the only reason RHEL took over CentOS was to kill the competition.

This is also highly frustrating as I just completed new CentOS8 and RHEL8 builds for Non-production and Production Servers and had already begun deployments. Now I'm left in situation of finding a new Linux distribution for our enterprise while I sweat out the last few years of RHEL7/CentOS7. Ubuntu is probably a no go there enterprise tooling is somewhat lacking, and I am of the opinion that they will likely be gobbled up buy Microsoft in the next few years.

Unfortunately, the short-sighted RH/IBMer that made this decision failed to realize that a lot of Admins that used Centos at home and in the enterprise also advocated and drove sales towards RedHat as well. Now with this announcement I'm afraid the damage is done and even if you were to take back your announcement, trust has been broken and the blowback will ultimately mean the death of CentOS and reduced sales of RHEL. There is however an opportunity for another Corporations such as SUSE which is own buy Microfocus to capitalize on this epic blunder simply by announcing an LTS version of OpenSues Leap. This would in turn move people/corporations to the Suse platform which in turn would drive sale for SLES.

William Ashford says: December 9, 2020 at 2:02 am

So the inevitable has come to pass, what was once a useful Distro will disappear like others have. Centos was handy for education and training purposes and production when you couldn't afford the fees for "support", now it will just be a shadow of Fedora.

Christian Reiss says: December 9, 2020 at 6:28 am

This is disgusting. Bah. As a CTO I will now - today - assemble my teams and develop a plan to migrate all DataCenters back to Debian for good. I will also instantly instruct the termination of all mirroring of your software.

For the software (CentOS) I hope for a quick death that will not drag on for years.

Ian says: December 9, 2020 at 2:10 am

This is a bit sad. There was always a conflict of interest associated with Redhat managing the Centos project and this is the end result of this conflict of interest.

There is a genuine benefit associated with the existence of Centos for Redhat however it would appear that that benefit isn't great enough and some arse clown thought that by forcing users to migrate it will increase Redhat's revenue.

The reality is that someone will repackage Redhat and make it just like Centos. The only difference is that Redhat now live in the same camp as Oracle.

cody says: December 9, 2020 at 4:53 am

Everyone predicted this when redhat bought centos. And when IBM bought RedHat it cemented everyone's notion.

Ganesan Rajagopal says: December 9, 2020 at 5:09 am

Thankfully we just started our migration from CentOS 7 to 8 and this surely puts a stop to that. Even if CentOS backtracks on this decision because of community backlash, the reality is the trust is lost. You've just given a huge leg for Ubuntu/Debian in the enterprise. Congratulations!

Bomel says: December 9, 2020 at 6:22 am

I am senior system admin in my organization which spends millions dollar a year on RH&IBM products. From tomorrow, I will do my best to convince management to minimize our spending on RH & IBM, and start looking for alternatives to replace existing RH & IBM products under my watch.

Steve says: December 9, 2020 at 8:57 am

IBM are seeing every CentOS install as a missed RHEL subscription...

Ralf says: December 9, 2020 at 10:29 am

Some years ago IBM bought Informix. We switched to PostgreSQL, when Informix was IBMized. One year ago IBM bought Red Hat and CentOS. CentOS is now IBMized. Guess what will happen with our CentOS installations. What's wrong with IBM?

Michel-André says: December 9, 2020 at 5:18 pm

Hi all,

Remember when RedHat, around RH-7.x, wanted to charge for the distro, the community revolted so much that RedHat saw their mistake and released Fedora. You can fool all the people some of the time, and some of the people all the time, but you cannot fool all the people all the time.

Even though RedHat/CentOS has a very large share of the Linux server market, it will suffer the same fate as Novell (had 85% of the matket), disappearing into darkness !

Mihel-André

PeteVM says: December 9, 2020 at 5:27 pm

As I predicted, RHEL is destroying CentOS, and IBM is running Red Hat into the ground in the name of profit$. Why is anyone surprised? I give Red Hat 12-18 months of life, before they become another ordinary dept of IBM, producing IBM Linux.

CentOS is dead. Time to either go back to Debian and its derivatives, or just pay for RHEL, or IBMEL, and suck it up.

JadeK says: December 9, 2020 at 6:36 pm

I am mid-migration from Rhel/Cent6 to 8. I now have to stop a major project for several hundred systems. My group will have to go back to rebuild every CentOS 8 system we've spent the last 6 months deploying.

Congrats fellas, you did it. You perfected the transition to Debian from CentOS.

Godimir Kroczweck says: December 9, 2020 at 8:21 pm

I find it kind of funny, I find it kind of sad. The dreams in which I moving 1.5K+ machines to whatever distro I yet have to find fitting for replacement to are the..

Wait. How could one with all the seriousness consider cutting down already published EOL a good idea?

I literally had to convince people to move from Ubuntu and Debian installations to CentOS for sake of stability and longer support, just for become looking like a clown now, because with single move distro deprived from both of this.

Paul R says: December 9, 2020 at 9:14 pm

Happy to donate and be part of the revolution away the Corporate vampire Squid that is IBM

Nicholas Knight says: December 9, 2020 at 9:34 pm

Red Hat's word now means nothing to me. Disagreements over future plans and technical direction are one thing, but you *lied* to us about CentOS 8's support cycle, to the detriment of *everybody*. You cost us real money relying on a promise you made, we thought, in good faith. It is now clear Red Hat no longer knows what "good faith" means, and acts only as a Trumpian vacuum of wealth.

[Dec 10, 2020] GPL bites Red hat in the butt: they might faceemarge of CentOs alternative due to the wave of support for such distro

Dec 10, 2020 | blog.centos.org

Sam Callis says: December 8, 2020 at 3:58 pm

I have been using CentOS for over 10 years and one of the things I loved about it was how stable it has been. Now, instead of being a stable release, it is changing to the beta testing ground for RHEL 8.

And instead of 10 years of a support you need to update to the latest dot release. This has me, very concerned.

Sieciowski says: December 9, 2020 at 11:19 am

well, 10 years - have you ever contributed with anything for the CentOS community, or paid them a wage or at least donated some decent hardware for development or maybe just being parasite all the time and now are you surprised that someone has to buy it's your own lunches for a change?

If you think you might have done it even better why not take RH sources and make your own FreeRHos whatever distro, then support, maintain and patch all the subsequent versions for free?

Joe says: December 9, 2020 at 11:47 am

That's ridiculous. RHEL has benefitted from the free testing and corner case usage of CentOS users and made money hand-over-fist on RHEL. Shed no tears for using CentOS for free. That is the benefit of opening the core of your product.

Ljubomir Ljubojevic says: December 9, 2020 at 12:31 pm

You are missing a very important point. Goal of CentOS project was to rebuild RHEL, nothing else. If money was the problem, they could have asked for donations and it would be clear is there can be financial support for rebuild or not.

Putting entire community in front of done deal is disheartening and no one will trust Red Hat that they are pro-community, not to mention Red Hat employees that sit in CentOS board, who can trust their integrity after this fiasco?

Matt Phelps says: December 8, 2020 at 4:12 pm

This is a breach of trust from the already published timeline of CentOS 8 where the EOL was May 2029. One year's notice for such a massive change is unacceptable.

Move this approach to CentOS 9

fahrradflucht says: December 8, 2020 at 5:37 pm

This! People already started deploying CentOS 8 with the expectation of 10 years of updates. - Even a migration to RHEL 8 would imply completely reprovisioning the systems which is a big ask for systems deployed in the field.

Gregory Kurtzer says: December 8, 2020 at 4:27 pm

I am considering creating another rebuild of RHEL and may even be able to hire some people for this effort. If you are interested in helping, please join the HPCng slack (link on the website hpcng.org).

Greg (original founder of CentOS)

Reply
A says: December 8, 2020 at 7:11 pm

Not a programmer, but I'd certainly use it. I hope you get it off the ground.

Michael says: December 8, 2020 at 8:26 pm

This sounds like a great idea and getting control away from corporate entities like IBM would be helpful. Have you considered reviving the Scientific Linux project?

Bond Masuda says: December 8, 2020 at 11:53 pm

Feel free to contact me. I'm a long time RH user (since pre-RHEL when it was RHL) in both server and desktop environments. I've built and maintained some RPMs for some private projects that used CentOS as foundation. I can contribute compute and storage resources. I can program in a few different languages.

Rex says: December 9, 2020 at 3:46 am

Dear Greg,

Thank you for considering starting another RHEL rebuild. If and when you do, please consider making your new website a Brave Verified Content Creator. I earn a little bit of money every month using the Brave browser, and I end up donating it to Wikipedia every month because there are so few Brave Verified websites.

The verification process is free, and takes about 15 to 30 minutes. I believe that the Brave browser now has more than 8 million users.

dovla091 says: December 9, 2020 at 10:47 am

Wikipedia. The so called organization that get tons of money from tech oligarchs and yet the whine about we need money and support? (If you don't believe me just check their biggest donors) also they keen to be insanely biased and allow to write on their web whoever pays the most... Seriously, find other organisation to donate your money

dan says: December 9, 2020 at 4:00 am

Please keep us updated. I can't donate much, but I'm sure many would love to donate to this cause.

Chad Gregory says: December 9, 2020 at 7:21 pm

Not sure what I could do but I will keep an eye out things I could help with. This change to CentOS really pisses me off as I have stood up 2 CentOS servers for my works production environment in the last year.

Vasile M says: December 8, 2020 at 8:43 pm

LOL... CentOS is RH from 2014 to date. What you expected? As long as CentOS is so good and stable, that cuts some of RHEL sales... RH and now IBM just think of profit. It was expected, search the net for comments back in 2014.

[Dec 10, 2020] Amazon Linux 2

Dec 10, 2020 | aws.amazon.com

Amazon Linux 2 is the next generation of Amazon Linux, a Linux server operating system from Amazon Web Services (AWS). It provides a secure, stable, and high performance execution environment to develop and run cloud and enterprise applications. With Amazon Linux 2, you get an application environment that offers long term support with access to the latest innovations in the Linux ecosystem. Amazon Linux 2 is provided at no additional charge.

Amazon Linux 2 is available as an Amazon Machine Image (AMI) for use on Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2). It is also available as a Docker container image and as a virtual machine image for use on Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM), Oracle VM VirtualBox, Microsoft Hyper-V, and VMware ESXi. The virtual machine images can be used for on-premises development and testing. Amazon Linux 2 supports the latest Amazon EC2 features and includes packages that enable easy integration with AWS. AWS provides ongoing security and maintenance updates for Amazon Linux 2.

[Dec 10, 2020] A letter to IBM brass

Notable quotes:
"... Redhat endorsed that moral contract when you brought official support to CentOS back in 2014. ..."
"... Now that you decided to turn your back on the community, even if another RHEL fork comes out, there will be an exodus of the community. ..."
"... Also, a lot of smaller developers won't support RHEL anymore because their target weren't big companies, making less and less products available without the need of self supporting RPM builds. ..."
"... Gregory Kurtzer's fork will take time to grow, but in the meantime, people will need a clear vision of the future. ..."
"... This means that we'll now have to turn to other linux flavors, like Debian, or OpenSUSE, of which at least some have hardware vendor support too, but with a lesser lifecycle. ..."
"... I think you destroyed a large part of the RHEL / CentOS community with this move today. ..."
"... Maybe you'll get more RHEL subscriptions in the next months yielding instant profits, but the long run growth is now far more uncertain. ..."
Dec 10, 2020 | blog.centos.org

Orsiris de Jong says: December 9, 2020 at 9:41 am

Dear IBM,

As a lot of us here, I've been in the CentOS / RHEL community for more than 10 years.
Reasons of that choice were stability, long term support and good hardware vendor support.

Like many others, I've built much of my skills upon this linux flavor for years, and have been implicated into the community for numerous bug reports, bug fixes, and howto writeups.

Using CentOS was the good alternative to RHEL on a lot of non critical systems, and for smaller companies like the one I work for.

The moral contract has always been a rock solid "Community Enterprise OS" in exchange of community support, bug reports & fixes, and growing interest from developers.

Redhat endorsed that moral contract when you brought official support to CentOS back in 2014.

Now that you decided to turn your back on the community, even if another RHEL fork comes out, there will be an exodus of the community.

Also, a lot of smaller developers won't support RHEL anymore because their target weren't big companies, making less and less products available without the need of self supporting RPM builds.

This will make RHEL less and less widely used by startups, enthusiasts and others.

CentOS Stream being the upstream of RHEL, I highly doubt system architects and developers are willing to be beta testers for RHEL.

Providing a free RHEL subscription for Open Source projects just sounds like your next step to keep a bit of the exodus from happening, but I'd bet that "free" subscription will get more and more restrictions later on, pushing to a full RHEL support contract.

As a lot of people here, I won't go the Oracle way, they already did a very good job destroying other company's legacy.

Gregory Kurtzer's fork will take time to grow, but in the meantime, people will need a clear vision of the future.

This means that we'll now have to turn to other linux flavors, like Debian, or OpenSUSE, of which at least some have hardware vendor support too, but with a lesser lifecycle.

I think you destroyed a large part of the RHEL / CentOS community with this move today.

Maybe you'll get more RHEL subscriptions in the next months yielding instant profits, but the long run growth is now far more uncertain.

... ... ...

[Dec 10, 2020] CentOS will be RHEL's beta, but CentOS denies this

IBM have a history of taking over companies and turning them into junk, so I am not that surprised. I am surprised that it took IBM brass so long to kill CentOS after Red Hat acquisition.
Notable quotes:
"... By W3Tech 's count, while Ubuntu is the most popular Linux server operating system with 47.5%, CentOS is number two with 18.8% and Debian is third, 17.5%. RHEL? It's a distant fourth with 1.8%. ..."
"... Red Hat will continue to support CentOS 7 and produce it through the remainder of the RHEL 7 life cycle . That means if you're using CentOS 7, you'll see support through June 30, 2024 ..."
Dec 10, 2020 | www.zdnet.com

I'm far from alone. By W3Tech 's count, while Ubuntu is the most popular Linux server operating system with 47.5%, CentOS is number two with 18.8% and Debian is third, 17.5%. RHEL? It's a distant fourth with 1.8%.

If you think you just realized why Red Hat might want to remove CentOS from the server playing field, you're far from the first to think that.

Red Hat will continue to support CentOS 7 and produce it through the remainder of the RHEL 7 life cycle . That means if you're using CentOS 7, you'll see support through June 30, 2024

[Dec 10, 2020] Time to bring back Scientific Linux

Notable quotes:
"... I bet Fermilab are thrilled back in 2019 they announced that they wouldn't develop Scientific Linux 8, and focus on CentOS 8 instead. ..."
Dec 10, 2020 | www.reddit.com

I bet Fermilab are thrilled back in 2019 they announced that they wouldn't develop Scientific Linux 8, and focus on CentOS 8 instead. https://listserv.fnal.gov/scripts/wa.exe?A2=SCIENTIFIC-LINUX-ANNOUNCE;11d6001.1904 l

clickwir 19 points· 1 day ago

Time to bring back Scientific Linux.

[Dec 10, 2020] CentOS Project: Embraced, extended, extinguished.

Notable quotes:
"... My gut feeling is that something like Scientific Linux will make a return and current CentOS users will just use that. ..."
Dec 10, 2020 | www.reddit.com

KugelKurt 18 points· 1 day ago

I wonder what Red Hat's plan is WRT companies like Blackmagic Design that ship CentOS as part of their studio equipment.

The cost of a RHEL license isn't the issue when the overall cost of the equipment is in the tens of thousands but unless I missed a change in Red Hat's trademark policy, Blackmagic cannot distribute a modified version of RHEL and without removing all trademarks first.

I don't think a rolling release distribution is what BMD wants.

My gut feeling is that something like Scientific Linux will make a return and current CentOS users will just use that.

[Dec 10, 2020] Oracle Linux -- A better alternative to CentOS

Currently limited of CentOS 6 and CentOS7.
Dec 10, 2020 | linux.oracle.com
Oracle Linux: A better alternative to CentOS

We firmly believe that Oracle Linux is the best Linux distribution on the market today. It's reliable, it's affordable, it's 100% compatible with your existing applications, and it gives you access to some of the most cutting-edge innovations in Linux like Ksplice and DTrace.

But if you're here, you're a CentOS user. Which means that you don't pay for a distribution at all, for at least some of your systems. So even if we made the best paid distribution in the world (and we think we do), we can't actually get it to you... or can we?

We're putting Oracle Linux in your hands by doing two things:

We think you'll like what you find, and we'd love for you to give it a try.

FAQ

Wait, doesn't Oracle Linux cost money?
Oracle Linux support costs money. If you just want the software, it's 100% free. And it's all in our yum repo at yum.oracle.com . Major releases, errata, the whole shebang. Free source code, free binaries, free updates, freely redistributable, free for production use. Yes, we know that this is Oracle, but it's actually free. Seriously.
Is this just another CentOS?
Inasmuch as they're both 100% binary-compatible with Red Hat Enterprise Linux, yes, this is just like CentOS. Your applications will continue to work without any modification whatsoever. However, there are several important differences that make Oracle Linux far superior to CentOS.
How is this better than CentOS?
Well, for one, you're getting the exact same bits our paying enterprise customers are getting . So that means a few things. Importantly, it means virtually no delay between when Red Hat releases a kernel and when Oracle Linux does:


Delay in kernel security advisories since January 2018: CentOS vs Oracle Linux; CentOS has large fluctuations in delays

So if you don't want to risk another CentOS delay, Oracle Linux is a better alternative for you. It turns out that our enterprise customers don't like to wait for updates -- and neither should you.

What about the code quality?
Again, you're running the exact same code that our enterprise customers are, so it has to be rock-solid. Unlike CentOS, we have a large paid team of developers, QA, and support engineers that work to make sure this is reliable.
What if I want support?
If you're running Oracle Linux and want support, you can purchase a support contract from us (and it's significantly cheaper than support from Red Hat). No reinstallation, no nothing -- remember, you're running the same code as our customers.

Contrast that with the CentOS/RHEL story. If you find yourself needing to buy support, have fun reinstalling your system with RHEL before anyone will talk to you.

Why are you doing this?
This is not some gimmick to get you running Oracle Linux so that you buy support from us. If you're perfectly happy running without a support contract, so are we. We're delighted that you're running Oracle Linux instead of something else.

At the end of the day, we're proud of the work we put into Oracle Linux. We think we have the most compelling Linux offering out there, and we want more people to experience it.

How do I make the switch?
Run the following as root:

curl -O https://linux.oracle.com/switch/centos2ol.sh
sh centos2ol.sh

What versions of CentOS can I switch?
centos2ol.sh can convert your CentOS 6 and 7 systems to Oracle Linux.
What does the script do?
The script has two main functions: it switches your yum configuration to use the Oracle Linux yum server to update some core packages and installs the latest Oracle Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel. That's it! You won't even need to restart after switching, but we recommend you do to take advantage of UEK.
Is it safe?
The centos2ol.sh script takes precautions to back up and restore any repository files it changes, so if it does not work on your system it will leave it in working order. If you encounter any issues, please get in touch with us by emailing oraclelinux-info_ww_grp@oracle.com .

[Dec 10, 2020] The demise of CentOs and independent training providers

Dec 10, 2020 | blog.centos.org

Anthony Mwai

says: December 8, 2020 at 8:44 pm

IBM is messing up RedHat after the take over last year. This is the most unfortunate news to the Free Open-Source community. Companies have been using CentOS as a testing bed before committing to purchase RHEL subscription licenses.

We need to rethink before rolling out RedHat/CentOS 8 training in our Centre.

Joe says: December 9, 2020 at 1:03 pm

You can use Oracle Linux in exactly the same way as you did CentOS except that you have the option of buying support without reinstalling a "commercial" variant.

Everything's in the public repos except a few addons like ksplice. You don't even have to go through the e-delivery to download the ISOs any more, they're all linked from yum.oracle.com

TechSmurf says: December 9, 2020 at 12:38 am

Not likely. Oracle Linux has extensive use by paying Oracle customers as a host OS for their database software and in general purposes for Oracle Cloud Infrastructure.

Oracle customers would be even less thrilled about Streams than CentOS users. I hate to admit it, but Oracle has the opportunity to take a significant chunk of the CentOS user base if they don't do anything Oracle-ish, myself included.

I'll be pretty surprised if they don't completely destroy their own windfall opportunity, though.

David Anderson says: December 8, 2020 at 7:16 pm

"OEL is literally a rebranded RH."

So, what's not to like? I also was under the impression that OEL was a paid offering, but apparently this is wrong - https://www.oracle.com/ar/a/ocom/docs/linux/oracle-linux-ds-1985973.pdf - "Oracle Linux is easy to download and completely free to use, distribute, and update."

Bill Murmor says: December 9, 2020 at 5:04 pm

So, what's the problem?

IBM has discontinued CentOS. Oracle is producing a working replacement for CentOS. If, at some point, Oracle attacks their product's users in the way IBM has here, then one can move to Debian, but for now, it's a working solution, as CentOS no longer is.

k1 says: December 9, 2020 at 7:58 pm

Because it's a trust issue. RedHat has lost trust. Oracle never had it in the first place.

[Dec 10, 2020] Oracle has a converter script for CentOS 7. And here is a quick hack to convert CentOs8 to Oracle Linux

You can use Oracle Linux exactly like CentOS, only better
Ang says: December 9, 2020 at 5:04 pm "I never thought we'd see the day Oracle is more trustworthy than RedHat/IBM. But I guess such things do happen with time..."
Notable quotes:
"... The link says that you don't have to pay for Oracle Linux . So switching to it from CentOS 8 could be a very easy option. ..."
"... this quick n'dirty hack worked fine to convert centos 8 to oracle linux 8, ymmv: ..."
Dec 10, 2020 | blog.centos.org

Charlie F. says: December 8, 2020 at 6:37 pm

Oracle has a converter script for CentOS 7, and they will sell you OS support after you run it:

https://linux.oracle.com/switch/centos/

It would be nice if Oracle would update that for CentOS 8.

David Anderson says: December 8, 2020 at 7:15 pm

The link says that you don't have to pay for Oracle Linux . So switching to it from CentOS 8 could be a very easy option.

Max Grü says: December 9, 2020 at 2:05 pm

Oracle Linux is free. The only thing that costs money is support for it. I quote "Yes, we know that this is Oracle, but it's actually free. Seriously."

Reply
Phil says: December 9, 2020 at 2:10 pm

this quick n'dirty hack worked fine to convert centos 8 to oracle linux 8, ymmv:

repobase=http://yum.oracle.com/repo/OracleLinux/OL8/baseos/latest/x86_64/getPackage
wget \
${repobase}/redhat-release-8.3-1.0.0.1.el8.x86_64.rpm \
${repobase}/oracle-release-el8-1.0-1.el8.x86_64.rpm \
${repobase}/oraclelinux-release-8.3-1.0.4.el8.x86_64.rpm \
${repobase}/oraclelinux-release-el8-1.0-9.el8.x86_64.rpm
rpm -e centos-linux-release --nodeps
dnf --disablerepo='*' localinstall ./*rpm 
:> /etc/dnf/vars/ociregion
dnf remove centos-linux-repos
dnf --refresh distro-sync
# since I wanted to try out the unbreakable enterprise kernel:
dnf install kernel-uek
reboot
dnf remove kernel

[Dec 09, 2020] Is Oracle A Real Alternative To CentOS

Notable quotes:
"... massive amount of extra packages and full rebuild of EPEL (same link): https://yum.oracle.com/oracle-linux-8.html ..."
Dec 09, 2020 | centosfaq.org

Is Oracle A Real Alternative To CentOS? Home " CentOS " Is Oracle A Real Alternative To CentOS? December 8, 2020 Frank Cox CentOS 33 Comments

Is Oracle a real alternative to CentOS ? I'm asking because genuinely don't know; I've never paid any attention to Oracle's Linux offering before now.

But today I've seen a couple of the folks here mention Oracle Linux and I see that Oracle even offers a script to convert CentOS 7 to Oracle. Nothing about CentOS 8 in that script, though.

https://linux.oracle.com/switch/ CentOS /

That page seems to say that Oracle Linux is everything that CentOS was prior to today's announcement.

But someone else here just said that the first thing Oracle Linux does is to sign you up for an Oracle account.

So, for people who know a lot more about these things than I do, what's the downside of using Oracle Linux versus CentOS? I assume that things like epel/rpmfusion/etc will work just as they do under CentOS since it's supposed to be bit-for-bit compatible like CentOS was. What does the "sign up with Oracle" stuff actually do, and can you cancel, avoid, or strip it out if you don't want it?

Based on my extremely limited knowledge around Oracle Linux, it sounds like that might be a go-to solution for CentOS refugees.

But is it, really?

Karl Vogel says: December 9, 2020 at 3:05 am

... ... ..

Go to https://linux.oracle.com/switch/CentOS/ , poke around a bit, and you end up here:
https://yum.oracle.com/oracle-linux-downloads.html

I just went to the ISO page and I can grab whatever I like without signing up for anything, so nothing's changed since I first used it.

... ... ...

Gianluca Cecchi says: December 9, 2020 at 3:30 am

[snip]

Only to point out that while in CentOS (8.3, but the same in 7.x) the situation is like this:

[g.cecchi@skull8 ~]$ ll /etc/redhat-release /etc/CentOS-release
-rw-r–r– 1 root root 30 Nov 10 16:49 /etc/CentOS-release lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 14 Nov 10 16:49 /etc/redhat-release -> CentOS-release
[g.cecchi@skull8 ~]$

[g.cecchi@skull8 ~]$ cat /etc/CentOS-release CentOS Linux release 8.3.2011

in Oracle Linux (eg 7.7) you get two different files:

$ ll /etc/redhat-release /etc/oracle-release 
-rw-r–r– 1 root root 32 Aug 8 2019 /etc/oracle-release 
-rw-r–r– 1 root root 52 Aug 8 2019 /etc/redhat-release 
$ cat /etc/redhat-release Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server release 7.7 (Maipo)
$ cat /etc/oracle-release Oracle Linux Server release 7.7 

This is generally done so that sw pieces officially certified only on upstream enterprise vendor and that test contents of the redhat-release file are satisfied. Using the lsb_release command on an Oracle Linux 7.6 machine:

# lsb_release -a LSB Version: :core-4.1-amd64:core-4.1-noarch Distributor ID: OracleServer Description: Oracle Linux Server release 7.6 
Release: 7.6 
Codename: n/a 
# 

Gianluca

Rainer Traut says: December 9, 2020 at 4:18 am

Am 08.12.20 um 18:54 schrieb Frank Cox:

Yes, it is better than CentOS and in some aspects better than RHEL:

– faster security updates than CentOS, directly behind RHEl
– better kernels than RHEL and CentOS (UEKs) wih more features
– free to download (no subscription needed):
https://yum.oracle.com/oracle-linux-isos.html
– free to use:
https://yum.oracle.com/oracle-linux-8.html
massive amount of extra packages and full rebuild of EPEL (same link): https://yum.oracle.com/oracle-linux-8.html

Rainer Traut says: December 9, 2020 at 4:26 am

Hi,

Am 08.12.20 um 19:03 schrieb Jon Pruente:

KVM is a subscription feature. They want you to run Oracle VM Server for x86 (which is based on Xen) so they can try to upsell you to use the Oracle Cloud. There's other things, but that stood out immediately.

Oracle Linux FAQ (PDF): https://www.oracle.com/a/ocom/docs/027617.pdf

There is no subscription needed. All needed repositories for the oVirt based virtualization are freely available.

https://docs.oracle.com/en/virtualization/oracle-linux-virtualization-manager/getstart/manager-install.html#manager-install-prepare

Rainer Traut says: December 10, 2020 at 4:40 am

Am 09.12.20 um 17:52 schrieb Frank Cox:

I'll try to answer best to my knowledge.

  • No Account needed.

I have an oracle account but never used it for/with Oracle linux. There are oracle communities where you need an oracle account: https://community.oracle.com/tech/apps-infra/categories/oracle_linux

Niki Kovacs says: December 10, 2020 at 10:22 am

Le 10/12/2020 à 17:18, Frank Cox a écrit :

That's it. I know Oracle's history, but I think for Oracle Linux, they may be much better than their reputation. I'm currently fiddling around with it, and I like it very much. Plus there's a nice script to turn an existing CentOS installation into an Oracle Linux system.

Cheers,

Niki

--
Microlinux – Solutions informatiques durables
7, place de l'église – 30730 Montpezat Site : https://www.microlinux.fr Blog : https://blog.microlinux.fr Mail : info@microlinux.fr Tél. : 04 66 63 10 32
Mob. : 06 51 80 12 12

Ljubomir Ljubojevic says: December 10, 2020 at 12:53 pm

There is always Springdale Linux made by Princeton University: https://puias.math.ias.edu/

Johnny Hughes says: December 10, 2020 at 4:10 pm

Am 10.12.20 um 19:53 schrieb Ljubomir Ljubojevic:

I did a conversion of a test webserver from C8 to Springdale. It went smoothly.

Niki Kovacs says: December 12, 2020 at 11:29 am

Le 08/12/2020 à 18:54, Frank Cox a écrit :

I spent the last three days experimenting with it. Here's my take on it: https://blog.microlinux.fr/migration-CentOS-oracle-linux/

tl;dr: Very nice if you don't have any qualms about the company.

Cheers,

Niki

--
Microlinux – Solutions informatiques durables 7, place de l'église – 30730 Montpezat Site : https://www.microlinux.fr Blog : https://blog.microlinux.fr Mail : info@microlinux.fr Tél. : 04 66 63 10 32
Mob. : 06 51 80 12 12

Frank Cox says: December 12, 2020 at 11:52 am

That's a really excellent article, Nicholas. Thanks ever so much for posting about your experience.

Peter Huebner says: December 15, 2020 at 5:07 am

Am Dienstag, den 15.12.2020, 10:14 +0100 schrieb Ruslanas Gžibovskis:

According to the Oracle license terms and official statements, it is "free to download, use and share. There is no license cost, no need for a contract, and no usage audits."

Recommendation only: "For business-critical infrastructure, consider Oracle Linux Support." Only optional, not a mandatory requirement. see: https://www.oracle.com/linux

No need for such a construct. Oracle Linux can be used on any production system without the legal requirement to obtain a extra commercial license. Same as in CentOS.

So Oracle Linux can be used free as in "free-beer" currently for any system, even for commercial purposes. Nevertheless, Oracle can change that license terms in the future, but this applies as well to all other company-backed linux distributions.
--
Peter Huebner

[Apr 25, 2016] What's New in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.2

Video presentation.

[Dec 09, 2015] Three ways to easily encrypt your data on Linux

Ok, so you need to quickly encrypt the contents of you pen drive. The easiest solution is to compress them using the 7z archive file format, that is open source, cross-platform, and supports 256-bit encryption using the AES algorithm.

Encrypt with Seahorse

The third option that I will show basically utilizes the popular GNU PG tool to encrypt anything you want in your disk. What we need to install first are the following packages: gpg, seahorse, seahorse-nautilus, seahorse-daemon, and seahorse-contracts which is needed if you're using ElementaryOS like I do. The encryption will be based on a key that we need to create first by opening a terminal, and typing the following command:

[Feb 11, 2015] GHOST: glibc vulnerability (CVE-2015-0235)

First of all this is kind of system error that is not easy to exploit. You need to locate the vulnerable functions in core image and be able to overwrite them via call (length of which any reasonable programmer will check). So whether this vulnerability is exploitable or not for applications that we are running is an open question.

In any case most installed systems are theoretically vilnerable. Practically too if they are running applications that do not check length for such system calls.

Only recently patched systems with glibc-2.11.3-17.74.13.x86_64 and above are not vulnerable.

Red Hat's success aside, it's hard to profit from free by Barb Darrow

Dec 19 2014 | dewaynenet.wordpress.com

Posted by wa8dzp

Red Hat's success aside, it's hard to profit from free

<https://gigaom.com/2014/12/19/red-hats-success-aside-its-hard-to-profit-from-free/>

Red Hat, which just reported a profit of $47.9 million (or 26 cents a share) on revenue of $456 million for its third quarter, has managed to pull off a tricky feat: It's been able to make money off of free, well, open-source, software. (It's profit for the year-ago quarter was $52 million.)

In a blog post, Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst said the old days when IT pros risked their careers by betting on open source rather than proprietary software are over. That old adage that you can't be fired for buying IBM should be updated, I guess.

In what looks something like a victory lap, Whitehurst wrote that every company now runs some sort of open source software. He wrote:

Many of us remember the now infamous "Halloween Documents," the classic quote from former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer describing Linux as a "cancer," and comments made by former Microsoft CEO Bill Gates, saying, "So certainly we think of [Linux] as a competitor in the student and hobbyist market. But I really do not think in the commercial market, we'll see it [compete with Windows] in any significant way."

He contrasted that to Ballmer successor's Satya Nadella's professed love of Linux. To be fair, Azure was well down the road to embracing open source late in Ballmer's reign but Microsoft's transition from open-source basher to open-source lover is still noteworthy - and indicative of open-source software's wide spread adoption. If you can't beat 'em, join 'em.

Open source is great, but profitable?

So everyone agrees that open source is goodness. But not everyone is sure that many companies will be able to replicate Red Hat's success profiting from it.

Sure, Microsoft wants people to run Linux and Java and whatever on Azure because that gives Azure a critical mass of new-age users who are not necessarily enamored of .NET and Windows. And, Microsoft has lots of revenue opportunities once those developers and companies are on Azure. (The fact that Microsoft is open-sourcing .NET is icing on the open-source cake.)

But how does a company that is 100 percent focused on say, selling support and services and enhancements to Apache Hadoop, make money? A couple of these companies are extremely well-funded and it's unclear where the cash burn ends and the profits can begin.

[snip]

Docker - FreeBSD like container + API for L

Linux Containers (LXC) is a virtualization method for running multiple isolated Linux systems. Docker extends LXC. It uses LXC, cgroups, Linux kernel and other parts to automate the deployment of applications inside software containers.

It comes with API to runs processes in isolation. With docker I can pack WordPress (or any other app written in Python/Ruby/Php & friends) and its dependencies in a lightweight, portable, self-sufficient container. I can deploy and test such container on any Linux based server.

Bad Lockup Bug Plagues Linux

Slashdot

jones_supa (887896) writes "A hard to track system lockup bug seems to have appeared in the span of couple of most recent Linux kernel releases. Dave Jones of Red Hat was the one to first report his experience of frequent lockups with 3.18. Later he found out that the issue is present in 3.17 too. The problem was first suspected to be related to Xen.

A patch dating back to 2005 was pushed for Xen to fix a vmalloc_fault() path that was similar to what was reported by Dave. The patch had a comment that read "the line below does not always work. Needs investigating!" But it looks like this issue was never properly investigated. Due to the nature of the bug and its difficulty in tracking down, testers might be finding multiple but similar bugs within the kernel. Linus even suggested taking a look in the watchdog code. He also concluded the Xen bug to be a different issue. The bug hunt continues in the Linux Kernel Mailing List."

Selected Skeptical Comments

binarylarry (1338699) on Saturday November 29, 2014 @01:04PM (#48485753)

Re: Have they checked systemd? (Score:5, Funny)

It's not systemd related, you can check by opening a termin

Anonymous Coward on Saturday November 29, 2014 @12:34PM (#48485599)

Re: What's happening to Linux? (Score:0)

The kernel with the above problems isn't in the 14.04 ubuntu repo, the latest kernel in 14.04 is 3.13 and is not having this problem. I'm sure it will be fixed soon.

Anonymous Coward on Saturday November 29, 2014 @01:15PM (#48485819)

Re:What's happening to Linux? (Score:1)

I love the assumption that this isn't happening in the corporate world.

It is. It just happens behind closed doors. Thus, patches.

raymorris (2726007) on Saturday November 29, 2014 @01:08PM (#48485775)

Try a stable distro like RH/CentOS. Or Mac (Score:3)

> First got into it ... because Linux was totally stable

If stable is your top priority, Fedora is approximately the worst possible choice. Fedora is essentially Red Hat Beta. If you want stable, the devel / beta branch is not for you. You'll probably be much happier with Red Hat or its twin, CentOS.

Also, you mentioned that you did an "upgrade" to Debian Unstable. You didn't mention any _reason_ for doing that. If stability is a top priority for you, don't upgrade just because you can, don't fix it if it aint broke.

Mac OSX may indeed be a good choice for you also. It is certified Unix and if you use the commondand line in Linux you'll find that day-to-day tasks are the same on a Mac. System internals are different of course, but bash, sed, awk, grep, and vim work just like they do on Linux.

Anonymous Coward on Saturday November 29, 2014 @02:14PM (#48486131)

Re:But guys... (Score:0)

RHEL is an entire distribution. Does this magically make every package inside "enterprise"?
I was referring to single tools and programs. Before you hit me with that "Windows is not a single tool" bat - it does not contain too much. Let's take usable entities instead of packages, software, tools, etc.

And that "doubled Software thing", it was kind of "finger intelligence", i.e. if your fingers type stupid things for themselves. I have another such example: Ever typed Touring complete instead of Turing complete? How about reading holocaust instead of localhost? ;)

jones_supa (887896) on Saturday November 29, 2014 @02:08PM (#48486099)

Re: But guys... (Score:4, Informative)

Have you ever compared enterprise class software (I also count Windows 7 Enterprise) with OSS Software? Windows does not even reliably support STR and resume. Using multiple monitors is a PITA.

Suspend and multiple monitors have always worked great in Windows for me. Under Linux, they have also worked fine in some machines, but I have also occasionally experienced serious problems with those areas. During recent times I have found out that even laptop screen brightness adjustment cannot be expected to work reliably out of the box under Linux.

SuricouRaven (1897204) on Saturday November 29, 2014 @03:26PM (#48486683)

Re: But guys... (Score:2)

There's an imbalance in development. Under windows, every hardware manufacturer does all they can to ensure their hardware is good - investing a lot of money in developing and testing the drivers. Under linux, the manufacturers usually don't care - aside from some server hardware, there just aren't enough resources to justify it from a business perspective. So development falls to three-man team on a side project, and sometimes it's down to community volunteers working from reverse-engineered specifications.

jellomizer (103300) on Saturday November 29, 2014 @03:09PM (#48486527)

Re: Come on Slashdot, get your news current (Score:3)

A Microsoft bug, proof of the incompetence of closed source.
A Linux bug. Either point to some closed source factor, or claim its solving a victory in the flexibility of open source.

Anonymous Coward on Saturday November 29, 2014 @01:36PM (#48485973)

Some actual information (Score:0)

So it may be a "bad" lockup bug in the sense that nobody knows exactly what causes it, but it's not "bad" in the sense that people should worry overly.

Why?

Dave Jones sees it only under insane loads (CPU loads of 150+) running a stress tester that is designed to do crazy things (trinity). And he can reproduce it on only one of his machines, and even there it takes hours. And it happens on a debug kernel that has DEBUG_PAGEALLOC and other explicit (and complex) debug code enabled. And even then the bug is a "Hmm. We made no progress in the last 21 seconds", rather than anything stranger.

In other words, it's "bad" in the sense that any unknown behavior is bad, but it's unknown mainly because it's so hard to trigger. Nobody else than core developers should really care. And those developers do care, so it's not like it's worrisome there either. It just takes longer to figure out because the usual "bisect it" approach isn't very easy when it can take a day to reproduce..

[Aug 31, 2012] Scientific Linux 6.3 Live CD/DVD Has Been Released

Official site is www.scientificlinux.org. Download are available from CERN
August 27, 2012 | Softpedia

Scientific Linux 6.3 is now based on Red Had Enterprise Linux 6.3, powered by Linux kernel 2.6.32, and features XOrg Server 1.7.7, IceWM 1.2.37, GNOME 2.28, Firefox 10.0.6, Thunderbird 10.0.6, LibreOffice 3.4.5.2 and KDE Software Compilation 4.3.4.

Moreover, the distro includes software from rpmforge, epel and elrepo in order to provide support for NTFS and Reiserfs filesystems, secure network connection via OpenVPN, VPNC, PPTP, better multimedia support, and various filesystem tools like dd_rescue, gparted, ddrescue, gdisk.

Scientific Linux 6.3 is distributed as Live CD and DVD ISO images, supporting both 32-bit and 64-bit architectures.

The complete list of changes with a comprehensive list of fixes, improvements, removed and updated packages, can be found in the official release announcement for Scientific Linux 6.3 Live CD/DVD.

[Aug 1, 2012] Oracle Linux A better alternative to CentOS

They provide conversion script: centos2ol.sh

Oracle Linux: A better alternative to CentOS We firmly believe that Oracle Linux is the best Linux distribution on the market today. It's reliable, it's affordable, it's 100% compatible with your existing applications, and it gives you access to some of the most cutting-edge innovations in Linux like Ksplice and dtrace.

But if you're here, you're a CentOS user. Which means that you don't pay for a distribution at all, for at least some of your systems. So even if we made the best paid distribution in the world (and we think we do), we can't actually get it to you... or can we?

We're putting Oracle Linux in your hands by doing two things:

◦We've made the Oracle Linux software available free of charge ◦We've created a simple script to switch your CentOS systems to Oracle Linux We think you'll like what you find, and we'd love for you to give it a try.

Switch your CentOS systems to Oracle Linux Run the following as root:

curl -O https://linux.oracle.com/switch/centos2ol.sh 
sh centos2ol.sh 

FAQ Q: Wait, doesn't Oracle Linux cost money? A: Oracle Linux support costs money. If you just want the software, it's 100% free. And it's all in our yum repo at public-yum.oracle.com. Major releases, errata, the whole shebang. Free source code, free binaries, free updates, freely redistributable, free for production use. Yes, we know that this is Oracle, but it's actually free. Seriously.

[Apr 20, 2012] Oracle Linux The Past, Present and Future Revealed

Apr 19, 2012 | The VAR Guy

During our conversation, Coekaerts touched on a range of additional topics - such as:

[Feb 28, 2012] Red Hat vs. Oracle Linux Support 10 Years Is New Standard

The VAR Guy

The support showdown started a couple of weeks ago, when Red Hat extended the life cycle of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) versions 5 and 6 from the norm of seven years to a new standard of 10 years. A few days later, Oracle responded by extending Oracle Linux life cycles to 10 years. Side note: It sounds like SUSE, now owned by Attachmate, also offers extended Linux support of up to 10 years.


Recommended Links

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Top articles

[Dec 29, 2020] Migrer de CentOS Oracle Linux Petit retour d'exp rience Le blog technique de Microlinux Published on Dec 30, 2020 | blog.microlinux.fr

[Dec 28, 2020] Red Hat interpretation of CenOS8 fiasco Published on Dec 28, 2020 | blog.centos.org

Sites

Please visit nixCraft site. It has material well worth your visit.

Dr. Nikolai Bezroukov


Top 10 Classic Unix Humor Stories

1. The Jargon File the most famous Unix-related humor file.

Please note that so called "hacker dictionary" is the jargon file spoiled by Eric Raymond :-) -- earlier versions of jargon file are better than the latest hacker dictionary...

2. Tao_Of_Programming (originated in 1992). This is probably No. 2 classic. There are several variants, but the link provided seems to be the original text (or at least an early version close to the original).

Here is a classic quote:

"When you have learned to snatch the error code from the trap frame, it will be time for you to leave."

... ...

If the Tao is great, then the operating system is great. If the operating system is great, then the compiler is great. If the compiler is greater, then the applications is great. The user is pleased and there is harmony in the world.

3. Know your Unix System Administrator by Stephan Zielinski -- Probably the third most famous Unix humor item. See also KNOW YOUR UNIX SYSTEM ADMINISTRATOR also at Field Guide to System Administrators [rec.humor.funny]. I personally like the descriptions of idiots and fascists and tend to believe that a lot of administrative fascists are ex-secretaries :-). At the same time former programmers can became sadists also quite often -- there is something in sysadmin job that seems cultivates the feeling of superiority and sadism ( "Users are Losers" mentality. IMHO other members of classification are not that realistic :-) :

There are four major species of Unix sysad:

  1. The

    Technical Thug.
    Usually a systems programmer who has been forced into system administration; writes scripts in a polyglot of the Bourne shell, sed, C, awk, perl, and APL.

  2. The Administrative Fascist.
    Usually a retentive drone (or rarely, a harridan ex-secretary) who has been forced into system administration.
  3. The Maniac.
    Usually an aging cracker who discovered that neither the Mossad nor Cuba are willing to pay a living wage for computer espionage. Fell into system administration; occasionally approaches major competitors with indesp schemes.
  4. The Idiot.
    Usually a cretin, morphodite, or old COBOL programmer selected to be the system administrator by a committee of cretins, morphodites, and old COBOL programmers.

---------------- SITUATION: Root disk fails. ----------------

TECHNICAL THUG:

Repairs drive. Usually is able to repair filesystem from boot monitor. Failing that, front-panel toggles microkernel in and starts script on neighboring machine to load binary boot code into broken machine, reformat and reinstall OS. Lets it run over the weekend while he goes mountain climbing.

ADMINISTRATIVE FASCIST:
Begins investigation to determine who broke the drive. Refuses to fix system until culprit is identified and charged for the equipment.
MANIAC, LARGE SYSTEM:
Rips drive from system, uses sledgehammer to smash same to flinders. Calls manufacturer, threatens pets. Abuses field engineer while they put in a new drive and reinstall the OS.
MANIAC, SMALL SYSTEM:
Rips drive from system, uses ball-peen hammer to smash same to flinders. Calls Requisitions, threatens pets. Abuses bystanders while putting in new drive and reinstalling OS.
IDIOT:
Doesn't notice anything wrong.

---------------- SITUATION: Poor network response. ----------------

TECHNICAL THUG:

Writes scripts to monitor network, then rewires entire machine room, improving response time by 2%. Shrugs shoulders, says, "I've done all I can do," and goes mountain climbing.

ADMINISTRATIVE FASCIST:
Puts network usage policy in motd. Calls up Berkeley and AT&T, badgers whoever answers for network quotas. Tries to get xtrek freaks fired.
MANIAC:
Every two hours, pulls ethernet cable from wall and waits for connections to time out.
IDIOT:
# compress -f /dev/en0

---------------- SITUATION: User questions. ----------------

TECHNICAL THUG:

Hacks the code of emacs' doctor-mode to answer new users questions. Doesn't bother to tell people how to start the new "guru-mode", or for that matter, emacs.

ADMINISTRATIVE FASCIST:
Puts user support policy in motd. Maintains queue of questions. Answers them when he gets a chance, often within two weeks of receipt of the proper form.
MANIAC:
Screams at users until they go away. Sometimes barters knowledge for powerful drink and/or sycophantic adulation.
IDIOT:
Answers all questions to best of his knowledge until the user realizes few UNIX systems support punched cards or JCL.

4. RFC 1925 The Twelve Networking Truths by R. Callon

  1. It Has To Work.
  2. No matter how hard you push and no matter what the priority, you can't increase the speed of light. (2a) (corollary). No matter how hard you try, you can't make a baby in much less than 9 months. Trying to speed this up *might* make it slower, but it won't make it happen any quicker.
  3. With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine. However, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.
  4. Some things in life can never be fully appreciated nor understood unless experienced firsthand. Some things in networking can never be fully understood by someone who neither builds commercial networking equipment nor runs an operational network.
  5. It is always possible to aglutenate multiple separate problems into a single complex interdependent solution. In most cases this is a bad idea.
  6. It is easier to move a problem around (for example, by moving the problem to a different part of the overall network architecture) than it is to solve it. (6a) (corollary). It is always possible to add another level of indirection.
  7. It is always something (7a) (corollary). Good, Fast, Cheap: Pick any two (you can't have all three).
  8. It is more complicated than you think.
  9. For all resources, whatever it is, you need more. (9a) (corollary) Every networking problem always takes longer to solve than it seems like it should.
  10. One size never fits all.
  11. Every old idea will be proposed again with a different name and a different presentation, regardless of whether it works. (11a) (corollary). See rule 6a.
  12. In protocol design, perfection has been reached not when there is nothing left to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.

5. Murphy's laws -- I especially like "Experts arose from their own urgent need to exist." :-). See also

  1. Nothing is as easy as it looks.

  2. Everything takes longer than you think.
  3. Anything that can go wrong will go wrong.
  4. If there is a possibility of several things going wrong, the one that will cause the most damage will be the one to go wrong. Corollary: If there is a worse time for something to go wrong, it will happen then.
  5. If anything simply cannot go wrong, it will anyway.
  6. If you perceive that there are four possible ways in which a procedure can go wrong, and circumvent these, then a fifth way, unprepared for, will promptly develop.
  7. Left to themselves, things tend to go from bad to worse.
  8. If everything seems to be going well, you have obviously overlooked something.
  9. Nature always sides with the hidden flaw.
  10. Mother nature is a bitch.
  11. It is impossible to make anything foolproof because fools are so ingenious.
  12. Whenever you set out to do something, something else must be done first.
  13. Every solution breeds new problems.

... ... ....

6. Network Week/The Bastard Operator from Hell. The classic story about an Administrative Fascist sysadmin.

7. Academic Programmers- A Spotter's Guide by Pete Fenelon; Department of Computer Science, University of York

Preamble
I Am The Greatest
Internet Vegetable
Rabid Prototyper
Get New Utilities!
Square Peg...
Objectionably ...

My Favourite ...
Give Us The Tools!
Macro Magician
Nightmare Networker
Configuration ...
Artificial Stupidity
Number Crusher

Meta Problem Solver
What's A Core File?
I Come From Ruritania
Old Fart At Play
I Can Do That!
What Colour ...
It's Safety Critical!

Objectionably Oriented

OO experienced a Road To Damascus situation the moment objects first crossed her mind. From that moment on everything in her life became object oriented and the project never looked back. Or forwards.

Instead, it kept sending messages to itself asking it what direction it was facing in and would it mind having a look around and send me a message telling me what was there...

OO thinks in Smalltalk and talks to you in Eiffel or Modula-3; unfortunately she's filled the disk with the compilers for them and instead of getting any real work done she's busy writing papers on holes in the type systems and, like all OOs, is designing her own perfect language.

The most dangerous OOs are OODB hackers; they inevitably demand a powerful workstation with local disk onto which they'll put a couple of hundred megabytes of unstructured, incoherent pointers all of which point to the number 42; any attempt to read or write it usually results in the network being down for a week at least.

8 Real Programmers Don't Write Specs

Real Programmers don't write specs -- users should consider themselves lucky to get any programs at all, and take what they get.

Real Programmers don't comment their code. If it was hard to write, it should be hard to understand.

Real Programmers don't write application programs, they program right down on the bare metal. Application programming is for feebs who can't do system programming.

... ... ...

Real Programmers aren't scared of GOTOs... but they really prefer branches to absolute locations.

9. Real Programmers Don't Use Pascal -- [ A letter to the editor of Datamation, volume 29 number 7, July 1983. Ed Post Tektronix, Inc. P.O. Box 1000 m/s 63-205 Wilsonville, OR 97070 Copyright (c) 1982]

Back in the good old days-- the "Golden Era" of computers-- it was easy to separate the men from the boys (sometimes called "Real Men" and "Quiche Eaters" in the literature). During this period, the Real Men were the ones who understood computer programming, and the Quiche Eaters were the ones who didn't. A real computer programmer said things like "DO 10 I=1,10" and "ABEND" (they actually talked in capital letters, you understand), and the rest of the world said things like "computers are too complicated for me" and "I can't relate to computers-- they're so impersonal". (A previous work [1] points out that Real Men don't "relate" to anything, and aren't afraid of being impersonal.)

But, as usual, times change. We are faced today with a world in which little old ladies can get computers in their microwave ovens, 12 year old kids can blow Real Men out of the water playing Asteroids and Pac-Man, and anyone can buy and even understand their very own personal Computer. The Real Programmer is in danger of becoming extinct, of being replaced by high school students with TRASH-80s.

There is a clear need to point out the differences between the typical high school junior Pac-Man player and a Real Programmer. If this difference is made clear, it will give these kids something to aspire to -- a role model, a Father Figure. It will also help explain to the employers of Real Programmers why it would be a mistake to replace the Real Programmers on their staff with 12 year old Pac-Man players (at a considerable salary savings).

10. bsd_logo_story

Last week I walked into a local "home style cookin' restaurant/watering hole" to pick up a take out order. I spoke briefly to the waitress behind the counter, who told me my order would be done in a few minutes.

So, while I was busy gazing at the farm implements hanging on the walls, I was approached by two, uh, um... well, let's call them "natives".

These guys might just be the original Texas rednecks -- complete with ten-gallon hats, snakeskin boots and the pervasive odor of cheap beer and whiskey.

"Pardon us, ma'am. Mind of we ask you a question?"

Well, people keep telling me that Texans are real friendly, so I nodded.

"Are you a Satanist?"

Etc: other historically important items

Programming Eagles

... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...

And they showed me the way There were salesmen down the corridor I thought I heard them say Welcome to Mountain View California Such a lovely place Such a lovely place (backgrounded) Such a lovely trace(1) Plenty of jobs at Mountain View California Any time of year Any time of year (backgrounded) You can find one here You can find one here

... ... ... ... ... ... ...

John Lennon's Yesterday -- variation for programmers.

Yesterday,
All those backups seemed a waste of pay.
Now my database has gone away.
Oh I believe in yesterday.

Suddenly,
There's not half the files there used to be,
And there's a milestone hanging over me
The system crashed so suddenly.

I pushed something wrong
What it was I could not say.
Now all my data's gone
and I long for yesterday-ay-ay-ay.

Yesterday,
The need for back-ups seemed so far away.
I knew my data was all here to stay,
Now I believe in yesterday.

The UNIX cult -- a satiric history of Unix

Notes from some recent archeological findings on the birth of the UNIX cult on Sol 3 are presented. Recently discovered electronic records have shed considerable light on the beginnings of the cult. A sketchy history of the cult is attempted.

On the Design of the UNIX operating System

This article was written in 1984 and was published in various UNIX newsletters across the world. I thought that it should be revived to mark the first 25 years of UNIX. If you like this, then you might also like The UNIX Cult.
Peter Collinson

,,, ,,, ,,,

'I Provide Office Solutions,' Says Pitiful Little Man a nice parody on programmers in general and open source programmers in particular

"VisTech is your one-stop source for Internet and Intranet open source development, as well as open source software support and collaborative development" said Smuda, adjusting the toupee he has worn since age 23. "We are a full-service company that can evaluate and integrate multi-platform open source solutions, including Linux, Solaris, Aix and HP-UX"

"Remember, no job is too small for the professionals at VisTech," added the spouseless, childless man, who is destined to die alone and unloved. "And no job is too big, either."

Unofficial Unix Administration Horror Story Summary

Best of DATAMATION GOTO-less

By R. Lawrence Clark*

From DATAMATION, December, 1973


Nearly six years after publication of Dijkstra's now-famous letter, [1] the subject of GOTO-less programming still stirs considerable controversy. Dijkstra and his supporters claim that the GOTO statement leads to difficulty in debugging, modifying, understanding and proving programs. GOTO advocates argues that this statement, used correctly, need not lead to problems, and that it provides a natural straightforward solution to common programming procedures.

Numerous solutions have been advanced in an attempt to resolve this debate. Nevertheless, despite the efforts of some of the foremost computer scientists, the battle continues to rage.

The author has developed a new language construct on which, he believes, both the pro- and the anti-GOTO factions can agree. This construct is called the COME FROM statement. Although usage of the COME FROM statement is independent of the linguistic environment, its use will be illustrated within the FORTRAN language.

Netslave quiz

AT YOUR LAST JOB INTERVIEW, YOU EXHIBITED:

A. Optimism
B. Mild Wariness
C. Tried to overcome headache. I was really tied
D. Controlled Hostility

2. DESCRIBE YOUR WORKPLACE:

A. An enterprising, dynamic group of individuals laying the groundwork for tomorrow's economy.
B. A bunch of geeks with questionable social skills.
C. An anxiety-ridden, with long hours and a lot of stress because of backbiting bunch of finger-pointers.
D. Jerks and PHB

3. DESCRIBE YOUR HOME:

A. Small, but efficient.
B. Shared and dormlike.
C. Rubble-strewn and fetid.
D. I have a personal network at my home with three or more connected computers and permanent connection to the Internet

NEW ELEMENT DISCOVERED!

The heaviest element known to science was recently discovered by university physicists. The new element was tentatively named Administratium. It has no protons and no electrons, and thus has an atomic number of 0. However, it does have one neutron, 15 assistant neutrons, 70 vice-neutrons, and 161 assistant vice-neutrons. This gives it an atomic mass of 247. These 247 particles are held together by a force that involves constant exchange of a special class of particle called morons.

Since it does not have electrons, Administratium is inert. However, it can be detected chemically as it impedes every reaction with which it comes into contact. According to the discoverers, a minute amount of Administratium added to one reaction caused it to take over four days to complete. Without Administratium, the reaction took less than one second.

Administratium has a half-life of approximately three years, after which it does not normally decay but instead undergoes a complex nuclear process called "Reorganization". In this little-understood process, assistant neutrons, vice-neutrons, and assistant vice-neutrons appear to exchange places. Early results indicate that atomic mass actually increases after each "Reorganization".

Misc Unproductive Time Classification -- nice parody on timesheets

You Might Be A Programmer If... By Clay Shannon - bclayshannon@earthlink.net

Jokes Magazine Drug Dealers Vs Software Developers

Jokes Magazine Ten Commandments For Stress Free Programming December 23, 1999

  1. Thou shalt not worry about bugs. Bugs in your software are actually special features.
  2. Thou shalt not fix abort conditions. Your user has a better chance of winning state lottery than getting the same abort again.
  3. Thou shalt not handle errors. Error handing was meant for error prone people, neither you or your users are error prone.
  4. Thou shalt not restrict users. Don't do any editing, let the user input anything, anywhere, anytime. That is being very user friendly.
  5. Thou shalt not optimize. Your user are very thankful to get the information, they don't worry about speed and efficiency.
  6. Thou shalt not provide help. If your users can not figure out themselves how to use your software than they are too dumb to deserve the benefits of your software any way.
  7. Thou shalt not document. Documentation only comes in handy for making future modifications. You made the software perfect the first time, it will never need mods.
  8. Thou shalt not hurry. Only the cute and the mighty should get the program by deadline.
  9. Thou shalt not revise. Your interpretation of specs was right, you know the users' requirements better than them.
  10. Thou shalt not share. If other programmers needed some of your code, they should have written it themselves.

Other Collections of Unix Humor


Don't let a few insignificant facts distract you from waging a holy war

A Slashdot post

It's spelled Linux, but it's pronounced "Not Windows"

- Usenet sig

It is time to unmask the programming community as a Secret Society for the Creation and Preservation of Artificial Complexity.

Edsger W. Dijkstra: The next forty years (EWD 1051)



Etc

Society

Groupthink : Two Party System as Polyarchy : Corruption of Regulators : Bureaucracies : Understanding Micromanagers and Control Freaks : Toxic Managers :   Harvard Mafia : Diplomatic Communication : Surviving a Bad Performance Review : Insufficient Retirement Funds as Immanent Problem of Neoliberal Regime : PseudoScience : Who Rules America : Neoliberalism  : The Iron Law of Oligarchy : Libertarian Philosophy

Quotes

War and Peace : Skeptical Finance : John Kenneth Galbraith :Talleyrand : Oscar Wilde : Otto Von Bismarck : Keynes : George Carlin : Skeptics : Propaganda  : SE quotes : Language Design and Programming Quotes : Random IT-related quotesSomerset Maugham : Marcus Aurelius : Kurt Vonnegut : Eric Hoffer : Winston Churchill : Napoleon Bonaparte : Ambrose BierceBernard Shaw : Mark Twain Quotes

Bulletin:

Vol 25, No.12 (December, 2013) Rational Fools vs. Efficient Crooks The efficient markets hypothesis : Political Skeptic Bulletin, 2013 : Unemployment Bulletin, 2010 :  Vol 23, No.10 (October, 2011) An observation about corporate security departments : Slightly Skeptical Euromaydan Chronicles, June 2014 : Greenspan legacy bulletin, 2008 : Vol 25, No.10 (October, 2013) Cryptolocker Trojan (Win32/Crilock.A) : Vol 25, No.08 (August, 2013) Cloud providers as intelligence collection hubs : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2010 : Inequality Bulletin, 2009 : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2008 : Copyleft Problems Bulletin, 2004 : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2011 : Energy Bulletin, 2010 : Malware Protection Bulletin, 2010 : Vol 26, No.1 (January, 2013) Object-Oriented Cult : Political Skeptic Bulletin, 2011 : Vol 23, No.11 (November, 2011) Softpanorama classification of sysadmin horror stories : Vol 25, No.05 (May, 2013) Corporate bullshit as a communication method  : Vol 25, No.06 (June, 2013) A Note on the Relationship of Brooks Law and Conway Law

History:

Fifty glorious years (1950-2000): the triumph of the US computer engineering : Donald Knuth : TAoCP and its Influence of Computer Science : Richard Stallman : Linus Torvalds  : Larry Wall  : John K. Ousterhout : CTSS : Multix OS Unix History : Unix shell history : VI editor : History of pipes concept : Solaris : MS DOSProgramming Languages History : PL/1 : Simula 67 : C : History of GCC developmentScripting Languages : Perl history   : OS History : Mail : DNS : SSH : CPU Instruction Sets : SPARC systems 1987-2006 : Norton Commander : Norton Utilities : Norton Ghost : Frontpage history : Malware Defense History : GNU Screen : OSS early history

Classic books:

The Peter Principle : Parkinson Law : 1984 : The Mythical Man-MonthHow to Solve It by George Polya : The Art of Computer Programming : The Elements of Programming Style : The Unix Hater’s Handbook : The Jargon file : The True Believer : Programming Pearls : The Good Soldier Svejk : The Power Elite

Most popular humor pages:

Manifest of the Softpanorama IT Slacker Society : Ten Commandments of the IT Slackers Society : Computer Humor Collection : BSD Logo Story : The Cuckoo's Egg : IT Slang : C++ Humor : ARE YOU A BBS ADDICT? : The Perl Purity Test : Object oriented programmers of all nations : Financial Humor : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2008 : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2010 : The Most Comprehensive Collection of Editor-related Humor : Programming Language Humor : Goldman Sachs related humor : Greenspan humor : C Humor : Scripting Humor : Real Programmers Humor : Web Humor : GPL-related Humor : OFM Humor : Politically Incorrect Humor : IDS Humor : "Linux Sucks" Humor : Russian Musical Humor : Best Russian Programmer Humor : Microsoft plans to buy Catholic Church : Richard Stallman Related Humor : Admin Humor : Perl-related Humor : Linus Torvalds Related humor : PseudoScience Related Humor : Networking Humor : Shell Humor : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2011 : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2012 : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2013 : Java Humor : Software Engineering Humor : Sun Solaris Related Humor : Education Humor : IBM Humor : Assembler-related Humor : VIM Humor : Computer Viruses Humor : Bright tomorrow is rescheduled to a day after tomorrow : Classic Computer Humor

The Last but not Least Technology is dominated by two types of people: those who understand what they do not manage and those who manage what they do not understand ~Archibald Putt. Ph.D


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Created May 16, 1996; Last modified: March 31, 2021