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Perl-based Bug Tracking

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Bugzilla Trac Version Control & Configuration Management Tools SE quotes Etc

Introduction

Bug tracking systems (BTS) are simple tools for a very complex problem - tracking and managing defects, bugs, issues and problems. Companies that use a good BTS suitable for the problems in hand can get substantial improvements in productivity. BTS gives you the ability to assign categories to bugs, and then analyze them according to those categories. Previously and even today for small organization Bug tracking system also doubles as a custom based knowledge system, but lately this role was delegated to Wikies.

For example Trac position itself as both bug tracking system and wiki:

Trac is an enhanced wiki and issue tracking system for software development projects. Trac uses a minimalistic approach to web-based software project management. Our mission is to help developers write great software while staying out of the way. Trac should impose as little as possible on a team's established development process and policies.

It provides an interface to ​Subversion and ​Git (or other version control systems), an integrated Wiki and convenient reporting facilities.

Trac allows wiki markup in issue descriptions and commit messages, creating links and seamless references between bugs, tasks, changesets, files and wiki pages. A timeline shows all current and past project events in order, making the acquisition of an overview of the project and tracking progress very easy. The roadmap shows the road ahead, listing the upcoming milestones.

If you are involved in something very complex there is a lot of value in using a simple tool. It is simpler to learn, simpler to use and simpler to do what it is you need to do. Complex tools that try to integrate with other areas of the project's management carry a much higher overhead in learning, using and doing. Often complex tools are left on the shelf and paper-based systems used by the teams doing the work.

Bug tracking tools provide a means of consolidating a key element of project information in one place.  When a bug is found, a tester or quality analyst records the bug and the steps needed to reproduce it. A developer will then fix it and tell the tester it has been fixed. The tester will then check the bug has really been fixed, and close it. Project managers can then see which bugs have been fixed, which are outstanding and how long it is taking to fix defects. Senior management can use reports to understand the state of the development process.

For any but the simplest projects, it is hard to keep track of what bugs have been detected, and which of them have been fixed. As well as automating this process, bug tracking tools make possible to produce some metrics and reports which, if not overdone, can be useful.

Because you have an instantly available database of bugs  you can take steps that help to lessen their number. Even a simple summary reports showing how many show stopper bugs are still unfixed in your software, or how long it is taking on average to fix high priority bugs have a great value.

Reduced clerical overhead is another benefit.

Classification of bug-tracking systems

Because there are so many bug-tracking and ticketing systems, I've split the list into two: Open Source and Commercial. Note some important gray areas between the open source and commercial packages: some of the open source packages are commercially supported and widely used; whereas some of the commercial packages have small customer bases and are barely supported. Some of the commercial packages, e.g. Keystone, makes broad use of open source technologies for its implementation, and is *almost* open source (whatever that means). Some of the commercial packages make source code available at a very modest price.

Open source bug tracking systems

Bugzilla
Bugzilla is one of the most popular bug-tracking systems. It is a spinoff from the Mozilla group.  This is a Web based bug tracking system, implemented in Perl with MySQL as a back end. It's quite solit, well tested and is used by a number of high-traffic web sites. This is a major system; read more about its features here. Download source here.
Trac
Trac is an enhanced wiki and issue tracking system for software development projects. Trac uses a minimalistic approach to web-based software project management. Our mission is to help developers write great software while staying out of the way. Trac should impose as little as possible on a team's established development process and policies.

It provides an interface to ​Subversion and ​Git (or other version control systems), an integrated Wiki and convenient reporting facilities.

Trac allows wiki markup in issue descriptions and commit messages, creating links and seamless references between bugs, tasks, changesets, files and wiki pages. A timeline shows all current and past project events in order, making the acquisition of an overview of the project and tracking progress very easy. The roadmap shows the road ahead, listing the upcoming milestones.

 

 
WebCall
WebCall is a web-based trouble ticketing system. It distinguishes itself from many other systems by including reports and graphs, such as a bar chart of tickets opened by month, or a pie chart of calls by customer. Can export to spreadsheets (excel format). The technology is Perl5 cgi-bin's backed onto the MySQL database. GPL'ed.

 

TouxDoux
TouxDoux is a project to create a task manager. It currently seems to be somewhere between the alpha and beta stage, and is possibly usable as a personal task manager. The GUI is GTK/Gnome-based; the data store is SQL (Postgres or MySQL). Its not clear if any multi-user/groupware features are planned.

 

Roundup
Roundup is a project to create an issue tracker in Python. In the alpha/beta stage. The primary strengths of this project is its acute attention to user interface and usability issues.

 

ProManager
ProManager is a task-tracking tool. Uses a PHP front-end, various SQL backends. Translated to 16 languages. Public-domain license. Currently very basic in the set of features that it offers, although it does a few things other basic packages don't: Support for authenticated users (users must login), hierarchical tasks (tasks can have sub-tasks), e-mail/SMS notification, ability to assign tasks for first free user on a queue. Screenshots

 

RT
RT is an web-based trouble-ticketing system. Tickets can be opened by email, web or command line. Written in perl, MySQL backend. Similar to Req and RUST in that email is fundamental part of the system. GPL'ed. Seems to handle basic functions rather well, and since this system has been around for quite a while, the rough spots are probably worn smooth. Nice new search feature. Screenshots. Includes several mailing lists, and list archives. Development of version 2.0 in active development.

 

ReqNG
ReqNG is a email-based trouble-ticketing system. Written in perl, flat-file(?) backend. Traces its lineage back to the original Req (see below). GPL'ed. Seems to do a good job handling all the basics, and since this system has been around for a while, it should be comfortable to use. There are many adjunct developments that include a WWWReq, a web-based interface (screenshots), TkReq, a tcl/tk client front-end (screenshot), and xreq, a Motif front-end.
 
GNATS (aka PRMS)
The GNATS/PRMS Gnu Bug Tracking System has been the cornerstone of Free Software bug tracking systems. The core is command-line, e-mail based, allowing additional tools and GUI wrappers to be created for it. These include wwwgnats, a web interface, and TkGnats, a Tk interface.

Do not confuse with the GNU GNAT tool, the GNU Ada95 Translator.

 

Double Choco Latte
Double Choco Latte is a basic web-based trouble-ticketing system. Implemented in PHP, with PostgresSQL or MySQL backends. GPL'ed. Sourceforge project. Screenshots. Provides basic job estimation and time-tracking, and a statistics page that totals hours worked. Requires Javascript-enabled browsers.

 

Teacup
Teacup is a web-based trouble-ticketing system. Implemented in Perl, with a PostgresSQL back-end. GPL'ed. Includes basic support for work estimation, time-tracking, and billing of work to an account. Two live demo pages: the customer (originator) interface and the responder database (requires username test password test). (This system is still in development: e.g. There seems to be no way for a customer who opened a ticket to add additional material to the ticket, or otherwise edit the ticket, or cancel it. Another missing feature: problem descriptions are not properly logged: a malicious or incompetent technician could erase or mis-modify the original problem description.)

 

JitterBug
JitterBug is a simple web based bug tracking system developed by the Samba Team to handle the huge volume of mail they get at the samba-bugs mail alias. They have been using the system since October 1997 with very good results. JitterBug is written in C and runs as a CGI program under your web server. Uses a flat-file backend. Messages enter the system via email or a web interface. It is available under the GPL.

Features:

 

wreq
wreq is trouble-ticketing system. Features web and email interfaces. wreq is designed to be distributed, using a hierarchy of master and departmental servers -- useful not only for load-balancing, but, probably more importantly, to let different political/administrative groups control their own servers. It not only tracks work requests, but provides facilities for publishing FAQ's and HOWTO's across the server hierarchy. Implemented in perl, using gdbm as the database back-end.

 

PHP HelpDesk
PHP Helpdesk is a project to create a PHP-based bug-tracking system. Hooks up to a MySQL backend. Currently supports only the basic functions (ticket creation, viewing and search). Administration and configuration (such as addition/deletion of new users, projects, categories) is also through web-based dialogs. See home page for screenshots. Sourceforge project.

 

BTT - Bluetail Ticket Tracker
Bluetail Ticket Tracker is a basic trouble-ticketing system. Written in Erlang, and thus runs on Windows as well as Linux. GPL'ed.

 

Tracker
Tracker is a Zope-based WikiWiki-style bug tracking system. Seems to support the basic bug-tracking features.

 

Debian Bug Tracking System
The Debian Bug Tracking System is an e-mail based system with a web-based report generator. It is in active use by the the Debian project.

Features:

The web interface will sorely disappoint web users used to web-based bug tracking tools. The web display does not use HTML tables for layout, and thus the pages look very raw. E-mail headers on the bug submissions are not trimmed, and thus most of the web page is filled with with cryptic-looking, dense, and not very important email headers. There is no way to manipulate reports from the web interface. Most customization, as to projects, sub-projects and states has to be done by hand by editing configuration files. There is no support for user authenticati/sourceforge.net/projects/phpsat/">PHPSAT PHP System Administrator's Tool. Its an issue tracker.

 

HelpDesk  Perl
HelpDesk is a web-based trouble-ticketing system. Written in perl (Apache/modperl), with MySQL as the back end. GPL'ed. Currently, supports only the most basic function. Screenshot.

 

Open Track
The OpenTrack defect and enhancement tracking system was originally distributed by OSF, and is maintained as an open-source project by AccuRev. Defects/change requests are stored in a flat-file system. Has both TCL and Web interfaces. Ported to NT. Does not appear to nurture any sort of user community. Source is available but oddly packaged. It comes under the OSF Free License.

 

Job Control System (JCS)
Job Control System (JCS) is a GPL'ed trouble-ticket package. Done up with Bourne-shell CGI scripts working from a flat-file database. Support can be purchased from Bynari International

Old News ;-)

Project details for Anthill Bug Manager

The Anthill Bug Manager is a tool that aids code development by keeping track of bugs in a medium-sized coding environment. It accomplishes this with a clean, simple, and fast interface that contains the essential features, but avoids the complexity associated with similar tools. It is written in Perl, requires an SQL database as a backend, and is Web server independent.

Project details for Scmbug

Scmbug is a system that integrates software configuration management (SCM) with bug-tracking. It aims to be a universal tool that will glue any source code version control system (such as CVS, Subversion, and Arch) with any bug-tracking system (such as Bugzilla and Mantis).

Project details for Bug Traction

Bug Traction is a Web-based bug tracking system written in Perl with DBI. It is based on Bugtrack, but adds a number of features. It should work in all situations where Bugtrack works, but there are features that have been added (such as attachments) that may not yet work with any database backend other than MySQL. In all other respects, Bug Traction is true to the Bugtrack heritage which it shares and should work on a variety of platforms and with a variety of database backends.

Project details for OTRS

OTRS (Open Ticket Request System) is an open source Ticket Request System and email management system with many features to manage customer telephone calls and email. The system is built to allow your support, sales, pre-sales, billing, internal IT, helpdesk, etc. department to react quickly to inbound inquiries. It is useful for people who receive many emails and want to answer them with a team of agents. It has been tested on Linux, Solaris, AIX, FreeBSD, OpenBSD, Mac OS 10.x, and Windows.

OTRS is an Open source Ticket Request System (also well known as trouble ticket system) with many features to manage customer telephone calls and e-mails. The system is built to allow your support, sales, pre-sales, billing, internal IT, helpdesk, etc. department to react quickly to inbound inquiries. Do you receive many e-mails and want to answer them with a team of agents? You're going to love the OTRS!

It is distributed under the GNU General Public License (GPL) and tested on Linux, Solaris, AIX, FreeBSD, OpenBSD, Mac OS 10.x and Windows.

The ((otrs)) company provides commercial services (e.g. support, consulting, pre-build-systems, etc.) for the OTRS (English and German).

Try our demo system to get an impression of this kind of magic.

PerlDesk PerlDesk

To install PerlDesk you need the following software on your computer:

 

Perl (www.perl.com / www.activestate.com)

MySQL (www.mysql.com)

Web Server e.g. Apache

Perl Modules (www.cpan.org)

DBI / DBD::MySQL

Digest::MD5


 

PerlDesk Features / Overview


Using PerlDesk in your organization will make your user emails/support requests easy to track and manage, it allows staff members to be assigned to single or multiple departments saving time assigning user requests.
 

PerlDesk makes submitting tickets easy for users, by allowing two methods:


 

Direct Email Submission

Users can send email to your company which will be logged, assigned to a specific department and given a tracking number. You can setup multiple incoming email addresses allowing you to completely manage user communications.
 

Web Based Submission

Included in PerlDesk is a web based client area and submission form, where users can login and track/submit any support requests easily.


 

Client Area Features

   


 

View PDF OverView
 

The web based user area can optionally be used as a resource for users to submit and track help desk submissions and emails. An overview of the features:


 

Multiple Language Support

Quick User Signup

File Attachments from web based form

Ability to assign a priority for the request

View support request histor

Submission Tracking without logging in (via submission key)

Unlimited number of users.

Flood Prevention for incoming emails, this only allows a user to submit a request every x seconds.

Searchable Knowledge Base (managed by staff members)


Staff Area Features
 

   


 

View PDF erView
 

 

 

An additional section of PerlDesk is the staff area, this is where you can allow staff members to login and respond to user requests.


 

Performance Tracking, staff members can view the % of calls they have closed

Rating Performance, users can rate how helpful a staff member was allowing satisfaction reporting in the administration

Private Staff notes can be set on help desk requests, so that users cannot view them

Assign requests to other departments or staff members

Staff Members can view/attach files when responding to user requests.

Easy call display, showing Emergency, new and open requests

Predefined response templates

Knowledge Base management

Ticket notifications

Many, many more features


 

 

Administration Area Features
 

   


 

View PDF OverView
 

 

The administration is where you can control all users/bills and the system setup. Some of the main features of the admin area are:


 

Change layout via the template editor

User Management, including the ability to create user accounts

Manage Staff, view staff members performance and response time

Ticket Overview

Create an unlimited number of support categories

Ban email addresses (bannin an email address will remove its ability to email submissions)

Manage software configuration, many options.

E-mail All Users

E-mail All Staff Members

Search Customers

View online/active staff members

Customize the whole design via the templates very easily

Edit the email response templates

Open Source Trouble Ticket System Resources

Bug Tracking

# re: Bug Tracking

Will Wilson

We use Mantis, which has proved so far to be perfect. Feature rich, stable, simple, quick & easily customizable. Not to mention multiplatform.

Posted @ 9/22/2004 8:26 AM 

# re: Bug Tracking

Michael Carr

I like Gemini by www.countersoft.com. Free license for up to 10 users.
 

Posted @ 9/22/2004 8:33 AM 

# re: Bug Tracking

Frans Bouma

I also looked at mantis, but there were a couple of very severe security issues in the past months. Internally we now use a simple howm grown app.

Posted @ 9/22/2004 8:49 AM 

# re: Bug Tracking

Yury Krasavin

<a href="http://www.axosoft.com/products/">Axosoft OnTime</a> is written for .NET Framework. Though, after more than a year of trading it is still quite raw to my sight.

Posted @ 9/22/2004 8:50 AM 

# re: Bug Tracking

Jesse Arnold

We're using a highly customized version of the asp.net startker kit. Some important added features are Sourcegear vault integration (similar to FugBugz), and user acceptance testing process. Any of course, it's all in C#. I will be releasing an open source version of this in the near future as well (nDevTracker).

Check it out here:
http://www.asp.net/Default.aspx?tabindex=8&tabid=47
and join in the discussion on the forums.

Posted @ 9/22/2004 9:26 AM 

# re: Bug Tracking

Christopher S. Charabaruk

I've use Mantis for my group, but I'd much rather be using Bugzilla.

Posted @ 9/22/2004 12:27 PM 

# re: Bug Tracking

JPDaigle

We use Bugzilla running on a Windows XP dev box (Apache / MySQL). We have a small team so this fits perfectly.

Our criteria for selecting a bug tracking solution:
* Easy to set up
* Free (as the decision to use bug-tracking software was made by the devs, not management)
 

Posted @ 9/22/2004 12:28 PM 

# re: Bug Tracking

MichaelM

We use Merant Tracker (Dev Staff) and FogBugz (Web Staff).

Merant is used because it's very flexible to how we want to prepare our bug reports.

FogBugz is used because it's cheaper and the Webstaff wanted something much simpler.

Hopefully VSTS will be our saviour and combine all this with a usable source control system.

Posted @ 9/22/2004 3:54 PM 

# New Team System Stuff - 2004-09-22

Rob Caron's Blog

 

Posted @ 9/23/2004 4:15 AM 

# re: Bug Tracking

Mark Peterson

Were using Agility and have been quite happy with it. Its highly customizable and has some great features.

Posted @ 9/29/2004 3:11 PM 

# re: Bug Tracking

Stan

http://www.countersoft.com

Offers .NET but issue tracking system.

Using it for a while: simple and effective.

 

Posted @ 9/30/2004 6:44 AM 

# re: Bug Tracking

Survey Software

We also use Agility (http://www.agileedge.com) to track the bugs in our survey software.

Posted @ 9/30/2004 6:28 PM 

 


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Legacy:

mozilla.org Bugzilla -- the Mozilla bug database

Bugzilla is open source software. Its source code has been released under the Mozilla Public License. Check out the Bugzilla project page if you would like to use the Bugzilla source to create a bug system for your own project.

WebCall (New Listing!)
WebCall is a web-based trouble ticketing system. It distinguishes itself from many other systems by including reports and graphs, such as a bar chart of tickets opened by month, or a pie chart of calls by customer. Can export to spreadsheets (excel format). The technology is Perl5 cgi-bin's backed onto the MySQL database. GPL'ed.

BATTS

BATTS (Barnhard Associates Trouble Ticketing System) is a lean, elegant trouble ticket system with both command line and Web interfaces, written in Perl. It uses MySQL for its backend, and has a ticket-via-email interface for submission and informational logging. Features include support for tickets pending on or resolved when other tickets are disposed of, an ability to assign tickets to a person, an ability to categorize and prioritize tickets, and associating billing codes with various logging events.

Request Tracker Perl-based

RT is an industrial-grade trouble ticketing system. It lets a group of people intelligently and efficiently manage requests submitted by a community of users. RT is used by systems administrators, customer support staffs, NOCs, developers, and even marketing departments to track issues, outages, bugs, requests, and all kinds of other things at thousands of sites around the world.

OTRS Perl-based

OTRS (Open Ticket Request System) is an open source Ticket Request System and email management system with many features to manage customer telephone calls and email. The system is built to allow your support, sales, pre-sales, billing, internal IT, helpdesk, etc. department to react quickly to inbound inquiries. It is useful for people who receive many emails and want to answer them with a team of agents. It has been tested on Linux, Solaris, AIX, FreeBSD, OpenBSD, Mac OS 10.x, and Windows.

Debian bug tracking software

The Debian bug tracking system is a set of scripts which maintain a database of problem reports.

Key features:

The scripts have been parameterised so that they can be used for other projects besides Debian; however, for a feel of what the results are like please see my local mirror of the Debian Project bug database, which also contains the system's user documentation.

The system runs on Unix and expects to have its own (possibly `virtual') mail domain, with the MTA for the host system being configured to pass mail for the bug system to it via a pipe command. You will need a fairly complete modern Unix installation to use it; most of the code is written in Perl5. A full list of requirements is in the README.


JitterBug 1.6.1
JitterBug is a web based bug tracking tool. It was originally written to help the Samba Team manage the huge volume of bug reports and queries they receive but is now also used by a number of other projects.

This release features much better handling of SMTP errors in the internal mailer.

Software Project Survival Guide - review

Cyclic System Administration Page

Static Source Code Analysis Tools (Lint) - CC++ Net Links

Ed Gehringer's homepage


Prototyping

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Literate programming

Noweb home page  -- Without wanting to be elitist, the thing that will prevent literate programming from becoming a mainstream method is that it requires thought and discipline. The mainstream is established by people who want fast results while using roughly the same methods that everyone else seems to be using, and literate programming is never going to have that kind of appeal. This doesn't take away from its usefulness as an approach.

Literate Programming and FunnelWeb

comp.programming.literate FAQ

Literate Programming Library

Bibliography on literate programming

ajh's literate programming page

ajh's useful WWW links

TeX Frequently Asked Questions - Section 8

Literate ProgrammingSeminar


Design patterns

Patterns and Software Essential Concepts and Terminology

FBenchmarks -- Fact, Fiction, or Fantasy?

Non-Software Examples of Software Design Patterns

Addison Wesley Longman - Design Patterns for Object-Oriented Software Development

What are disign pattern

Standard method/class combinations
Use mandatory type signatures
+ naming conventions
Good documentation for humans
And can be recognized by tools

Implementing Design Patterns in Java

Doug Lea's Workstation -- very good list of references. Tell much about the author

Books On-line Call Numbers Starting With QA -- just great

Please Read This Page Carefully.... -- que electronic books online




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Fifty glorious years (1950-2000): the triumph of the US computer engineering : Donald Knuth : TAoCP and its Influence of Computer Science : Richard Stallman : Linus Torvalds  : Larry Wall  : John K. Ousterhout : CTSS : Multix OS Unix History : Unix shell history : VI editor : History of pipes concept : Solaris : MS DOSProgramming Languages History : PL/1 : Simula 67 : C : History of GCC developmentScripting Languages : Perl history   : OS History : Mail : DNS : SSH : CPU Instruction Sets : SPARC systems 1987-2006 : Norton Commander : Norton Utilities : Norton Ghost : Frontpage history : Malware Defense History : GNU Screen : OSS early history

Classic books:

The Peter Principle : Parkinson Law : 1984 : The Mythical Man-MonthHow to Solve It by George Polya : The Art of Computer Programming : The Elements of Programming Style : The Unix Haterís Handbook : The Jargon file : The True Believer : Programming Pearls : The Good Soldier Svejk : The Power Elite

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The Last but not Least


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