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parsync - a parallel rsync wrapper for large data transfers

[Jun 13, 2018] parsync - a parallel rsync wrapper for large data transfers by Harry Mangalam

Jan 22, 2017  | nac.uci.edu

harry.mangalam@uci.edu

v1.67 (Mac Beta) Table of Contents

  1. Download
  2. Dependencies
  3. Overview
  4. parsync help

1. Download

If you already know you want it, get it here: parsync+utils.tar.gz (contains parsync plus the kdirstat-cache-writer , stats , and scut utilities below) Extract it into a dir on your $PATH and after verifying the other dependencies below, give it a shot.

While parsync is developed for and test on Linux, the latest version of parsync has been modified to (mostly) work on the Mac (tested on OSX 10.9.5). A number of the Linux-specific dependencies have been removed and there are a number of Mac-specific work arounds.

Thanks to Phil Reese < preese@stanford.edu > for the code mods needed to get it started. It's the same package and instructions for both platforms.

2. Dependencies

parsync requires the following utilities to work:

non-default Perl utility: URI::Escape qw(uri_escape)
sudo yum install perl-URI  # CentOS-like

sudo apt-get install liburi-perl  # Debian-like
parsync needs to be installed only on the SOURCE end of the transfer and uses whatever rsync is available on the TARGET. It uses a number of Linux- specific utilities so if you're transferring between Linux and a FreeBSD host, install parsync on the Linux side. In fact, as currently written, it will only PUSH data to remote targets ; it will not pull data as rsync itself can do. This will probably in the near future. 3. Overview rsync is a fabulous data mover. Possibly more bytes have been moved (or have been prevented from being moved) by rsync than by any other application. So what's not to love? For transferring large, deep file trees, rsync will pause while it generates lists of files to process. Since Version 3, it does this pretty fast, but on sluggish filesystems, it can take hours or even days before it will start to actually exchange rsync data. Second, due to various bottlenecks, rsync will tend to use less than the available bandwidth on high speed networks. Starting multiple instances of rsync can improve this significantly. However, on such transfers, it is also easy to overload the available bandwidth, so it would be nice to both limit the bandwidth used if necessary and also to limit the load on the system. parsync tries to satisfy all these conditions and more by:
Important Only use for LARGE data transfers The main use case for parsync is really only very large data transfers thru fairly fast network connections (>1Gb/s). Below this speed, a single rsync can saturate the connection, so there's little reason to use parsync and in fact the overhead of testing the existence of and starting more rsyncs tends to worsen its performance on small transfers to slightly less than rsync alone.
Beyond this introduction, parsync's internal help is about all you'll need to figure out how to use it; below is what you'll see when you type parsync -h . There are still edge cases where parsync will fail or behave oddly, especially with small data transfers, so I'd be happy to hear of such misbehavior or suggestions to improve it. Download the complete tarball of parsync, plus the required utilities here: parsync+utils.tar.gz Unpack it, move the contents to a dir on your $PATH , chmod it executable, and try it out.
parsync --help
or just
parsync
Below is what you should see:

4. parsync help

parsync version 1.67 (Mac compatibility beta) Jan 22, 2017
by Harry Mangalam <hjmangalam@gmail.com> || <harry.mangalam@uci.edu>

parsync is a Perl script that wraps Andrew Tridgell's miraculous 'rsync' to
provide some load balancing and parallel operation across network connections
to increase the amount of bandwidth it can use.

parsync is primarily tested on Linux, but (mostly) works on MaccOSX
as well.

parsync needs to be installed only on the SOURCE end of the
transfer and only works in local SOURCE -> remote TARGET mode
(it won't allow remote local SOURCE <- remote TARGET, emitting an
error and exiting if attempted).

It uses whatever rsync is available on the TARGET.  It uses a number
of Linux-specific utilities so if you're transferring between Linux
and a FreeBSD host, install parsync on the Linux side.

The only native rsync option that parsync uses is '-a' (archive) &
'-s' (respect bizarro characters in filenames).
If you need more, then it's up to you to provide them via
'--rsyncopts'. parsync checks to see if the current system load is
too heavy and tries to throttle the rsyncs during the run by
monitoring and suspending / continuing them as needed.

It uses the very efficient (also Perl-based) kdirstat-cache-writer
from kdirstat to generate lists of files which are summed and then
crudely divided into NP jobs by size.

It appropriates rsync's bandwidth throttle mechanism, using '--maxbw'
as a passthru to rsync's 'bwlimit' option, but divides it by NP so
as to keep the total bw the same as the stated limit.  It monitors and
shows network bandwidth, but can't change the bw allocation mid-job.
It can only suspend rsyncs until the load decreases below the cutoff.
If you suspend parsync (^Z), all rsync children will suspend as well,
regardless of current state.

Unless changed by '--interface', it tried to figure out how to set the
interface to monitor.  The transfer will use whatever interface routing
provides, normally set by the name of the target.  It can also be used for
non-host-based transfers (between mounted filesystems) but the network
bandwidth continues to be (usually pointlessly) shown.

[[NB: Between mounted filesystems, parsync sometimes works very poorly for
reasons still mysterious.  In such cases (monitor with 'ifstat'), use 'cp'
or 'tnc' (https://goo.gl/5FiSxR) for the initial data movement and a single
rsync to finalize.  I believe the multiple rsync chatter is interfering with
the transfer.]]

It only works on dirs and files that originate from the current dir (or
specified via "--rootdir").  You cannot include dirs and files from
discontinuous or higher-level dirs.

** the ~/.parsync files **
The ~/.parsync dir contains the cache (*.gz), the chunk files (kds*), and the
time-stamped log files. The cache files can be re-used with '--reusecache'
(which will re-use ALL the cache and chunk files.  The log files are
datestamped and are NOT overwritten.

** Odd characters in names **
parsync will sometimes refuse to transfer some oddly named files, altho
recent versions of rsync allow the '-s' flag (now a parsync default)
which tries to respect names with spaces and properly escaped shell
characters.  Filenames with embedded newlines, DOS EOLs, and other
odd chars will be recorded in the log files in the ~/.parsync dir.

** Because of the crude way that files are chunked, NP may be
adjusted slightly to match the file chunks. ie '--NP 8' -> '--NP 7'.
If so, a warning will be issued and the rest of the transfer will be
automatically adjusted.

OPTIONS
=======
[i] = integer number
[f] = floating point number
[s] = "quoted string"
( ) = the default if any

--NP [i] (sqrt(#CPUs)) ...............  number of rsync processes to start
      optimal NP depends on many vars.  Try the default and incr as needed
--startdir [s] (`pwd`)  .. the directory it works relative to. If you omit
                           it, the default is the CURRENT dir. You DO have
                           to specify target dirs.  See the examples below.
--maxbw [i] (unlimited) ..........  in KB/s max bandwidth to use (--bwlimit
       passthru to rsync).  maxbw is the total BW to be used, NOT per rsync.
--maxload [f] (NP+2)  ........ max total system load - if sysload > maxload,
                                               sleeps an rsync proc for 10s
--checkperiod [i] (5) .......... sets the period in seconds between updates
--rsyncopts [s]  ...  options passed to rsync as a quoted string (CAREFUL!)
           this opt triggers a pause before executing to verify the command.
--interface [s]  .............  network interface to /monitor/, not nec use.
      default: `/sbin/route -n | grep "^0.0.0.0" | rev | cut -d' ' -f1 | rev`
      above works on most simple hosts, but complex routes will confuse it.
--reusecache  ..........  don't re-read the dirs; re-use the existing caches
--email [s]  .....................  email address to send completion message
                                      (requires working mail system on host)
--barefiles   .....  set to allow rsync of individual files, as oppo to dirs
--nowait  ................  for scripting, sleep for a few s instead of wait
--version  .................................  dumps version string and exits
--help  .........................................................  this help

Examples
========
-- Good example 1 --
% parsync  --maxload=5.5 --NP=4 --startdir='/home/hjm' dir1 dir2 dir3
hjm@remotehost:~/backups

where
  = "--startdir='/home/hjm'" sets the working dir of this operation to
      '/home/hjm' and dir1 dir2 dir3 are subdirs from '/home/hjm'
  = the target "hjm@remotehost:~/backups" is the same target rsync would use
  = "--NP=4" forks 4 instances of rsync
  = -"-maxload=5.5" will start suspending rsync instances when the 5m system
      load gets to 5.5 and then unsuspending them when it goes below it.

  It uses 4 instances to rsync dir1 dir2 dir3 to hjm@remotehost:~/backups

-- Good example 2 --
% parsync --rsyncopts="--ignore-existing" --reusecache  --NP=3
  --barefiles  *.txt   /mount/backups/txt

where
  =  "--rsyncopts='--ignore-existing'" is an option passed thru to rsync
     telling it not to disturb any existing files in the target directory.
  = "--reusecache" indicates that the filecache shouldn't be re-generated,
    uses the previous filecache in ~/.parsync
  = "--NP=3" for 3 copies of rsync (with no "--maxload", the default is 4)
  = "--barefiles" indicates that it's OK to transfer barefiles instead of
    recursing thru dirs.
  = "/mount/backups/txt" is the target - a local disk mount instead of a network host.

  It uses 3 instances to rsync *.txt from the current dir to "/mount/backups/txt".

-- Error Example 1 --
% pwd
/home/hjm  # executing parsync from here

% parsync --NP4 --compress /usr/local  /media/backupdisk

why this is an error:
  = '--NP4' is not an option (parsync will say "Unknown option: np4")
    It should be '--NP=4'
  = if you were trying to rsync '/usr/local' to '/media/backupdisk',
    it will fail since there is no /home/hjm/usr/local dir to use as
    a source. This will be shown in the log files in
    ~/.parsync/rsync-logfile-<datestamp>_#
    as a spew of "No such file or directory (2)" errors
  = the '--compress' is a native rsync option, not a native parsync option.
    You have to pass it to rsync with "--rsyncopts='--compress'"

The correct version of the above command is:

% parsync --NP=4  --rsyncopts='--compress' --startdir=/usr  local
/media/backupdisk

-- Error Example 2 --
% parsync --start-dir /home/hjm  mooslocal  hjm@moo.boo.yoo.com:/usr/local

why this is an error:
  = this command is trying to PULL data from a remote SOURCE to a
    local TARGET.  parsync doesn't support that kind of operation yet.

The correct version of the above command is:

# ssh to hjm@moo, install parsync, then:
% parsync  --startdir=/usr  local  hjm@remote:/home/hjm/mooslocal

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[Jun 13, 2018] parsync - a parallel rsync wrapper for large data transfers by Harry Mangalam

Jan 22, 2017 | nac.uci.edu

harry.mangalam@uci.edu

harry.mangalam@uci.edu

v1.67 (Mac Beta) Table of Contents

  1. Download
  2. Dependencies
  3. Overview
  4. parsync help

1. Download

If you already know you want it, get it here: parsync+utils.tar.gz (contains parsync plus the kdirstat-cache-writer , stats , and scut utilities below) Extract it into a dir on your $PATH and after verifying the other dependencies below, give it a shot.

While parsync is developed for and test on Linux, the latest version of parsync has been modified to (mostly) work on the Mac (tested on OSX 10.9.5). A number of the Linux-specific dependencies have been removed and there are a number of Mac-specific work arounds.

Thanks to Phil Reese < preese@stanford.edu > for the code mods needed to get it started. It's the same package and instructions for both platforms.

2. Dependencies

parsync requires the following utilities to work:

non-default Perl utility: URI::Escape qw(uri_escape)
sudo yum install perl-URI  # CentOS-like

sudo apt-get install liburi-perl  # Debian-like
parsync needs to be installed only on the SOURCE end of the transfer and uses whatever rsync is available on the TARGET. It uses a number of Linux- specific utilities so if you're transferring between Linux and a FreeBSD host, install parsync on the Linux side. In fact, as currently written, it will only PUSH data to remote targets ; it will not pull data as rsync itself can do. This will probably in the near future. 3. Overview rsync is a fabulous data mover. Possibly more bytes have been moved (or have been prevented from being moved) by rsync than by any other application. So what's not to love? For transferring large, deep file trees, rsync will pause while it generates lists of files to process. Since Version 3, it does this pretty fast, but on sluggish filesystems, it can take hours or even days before it will start to actually exchange rsync data. Second, due to various bottlenecks, rsync will tend to use less than the available bandwidth on high speed networks. Starting multiple instances of rsync can improve this significantly. However, on such transfers, it is also easy to overload the available bandwidth, so it would be nice to both limit the bandwidth used if necessary and also to limit the load on the system. parsync tries to satisfy all these conditions and more by:
Important Only use for LARGE data transfers The main use case for parsync is really only very large data transfers thru fairly fast network connections (>1Gb/s). Below this speed, a single rsync can saturate the connection, so there's little reason to use parsync and in fact the overhead of testing the existence of and starting more rsyncs tends to worsen its performance on small transfers to slightly less than rsync alone.
Beyond this introduction, parsync's internal help is about all you'll need to figure out how to use it; below is what you'll see when you type parsync -h . There are still edge cases where parsync will fail or behave oddly, especially with small data transfers, so I'd be happy to hear of such misbehavior or suggestions to improve it. Download the complete tarball of parsync, plus the required utilities here: parsync+utils.tar.gz Unpack it, move the contents to a dir on your $PATH , chmod it executable, and try it out.
parsync --help
or just
parsync
Below is what you should see:

4. parsync help

parsync version 1.67 (Mac compatibility beta) Jan 22, 2017
by Harry Mangalam <hjmangalam@gmail.com> || <harry.mangalam@uci.edu>

parsync is a Perl script that wraps Andrew Tridgell's miraculous 'rsync' to
provide some load balancing and parallel operation across network connections
to increase the amount of bandwidth it can use.

parsync is primarily tested on Linux, but (mostly) works on MaccOSX
as well.

parsync needs to be installed only on the SOURCE end of the
transfer and only works in local SOURCE -> remote TARGET mode
(it won't allow remote local SOURCE <- remote TARGET, emitting an
error and exiting if attempted).

It uses whatever rsync is available on the TARGET.  It uses a number
of Linux-specific utilities so if you're transferring between Linux
and a FreeBSD host, install parsync on the Linux side.

The only native rsync option that parsync uses is '-a' (archive) &
'-s' (respect bizarro characters in filenames).
If you need more, then it's up to you to provide them via
'--rsyncopts'. parsync checks to see if the current system load is
too heavy and tries to throttle the rsyncs during the run by
monitoring and suspending / continuing them as needed.

It uses the very efficient (also Perl-based) kdirstat-cache-writer
from kdirstat to generate lists of files which are summed and then
crudely divided into NP jobs by size.

It appropriates rsync's bandwidth throttle mechanism, using '--maxbw'
as a passthru to rsync's 'bwlimit' option, but divides it by NP so
as to keep the total bw the same as the stated limit.  It monitors and
shows network bandwidth, but can't change the bw allocation mid-job.
It can only suspend rsyncs until the load decreases below the cutoff.
If you suspend parsync (^Z), all rsync children will suspend as well,
regardless of current state.

Unless changed by '--interface', it tried to figure out how to set the
interface to monitor.  The transfer will use whatever interface routing
provides, normally set by the name of the target.  It can also be used for
non-host-based transfers (between mounted filesystems) but the network
bandwidth continues to be (usually pointlessly) shown.

[[NB: Between mounted filesystems, parsync sometimes works very poorly for
reasons still mysterious.  In such cases (monitor with 'ifstat'), use 'cp'
or 'tnc' (https://goo.gl/5FiSxR) for the initial data movement and a single
rsync to finalize.  I believe the multiple rsync chatter is interfering with
the transfer.]]

It only works on dirs and files that originate from the current dir (or
specified via "--rootdir").  You cannot include dirs and files from
discontinuous or higher-level dirs.

** the ~/.parsync files **
The ~/.parsync dir contains the cache (*.gz), the chunk files (kds*), and the
time-stamped log files. The cache files can be re-used with '--reusecache'
(which will re-use ALL the cache and chunk files.  The log files are
datestamped and are NOT overwritten.

** Odd characters in names **
parsync will sometimes refuse to transfer some oddly named files, altho
recent versions of rsync allow the '-s' flag (now a parsync default)
which tries to respect names with spaces and properly escaped shell
characters.  Filenames with embedded newlines, DOS EOLs, and other
odd chars will be recorded in the log files in the ~/.parsync dir.

** Because of the crude way that files are chunked, NP may be
adjusted slightly to match the file chunks. ie '--NP 8' -> '--NP 7'.
If so, a warning will be issued and the rest of the transfer will be
automatically adjusted.

OPTIONS
=======
[i] = integer number
[f] = floating point number
[s] = "quoted string"
( ) = the default if any

--NP [i] (sqrt(#CPUs)) ...............  number of rsync processes to start
      optimal NP depends on many vars.  Try the default and incr as needed
--startdir [s] (`pwd`)  .. the directory it works relative to. If you omit
                           it, the default is the CURRENT dir. You DO have
                           to specify target dirs.  See the examples below.
--maxbw [i] (unlimited) ..........  in KB/s max bandwidth to use (--bwlimit
       passthru to rsync).  maxbw is the total BW to be used, NOT per rsync.
--maxload [f] (NP+2)  ........ max total system load - if sysload > maxload,
                                               sleeps an rsync proc for 10s
--checkperiod [i] (5) .......... sets the period in seconds between updates
--rsyncopts [s]  ...  options passed to rsync as a quoted string (CAREFUL!)
           this opt triggers a pause before executing to verify the command.
--interface [s]  .............  network interface to /monitor/, not nec use.
      default: `/sbin/route -n | grep "^0.0.0.0" | rev | cut -d' ' -f1 | rev`
      above works on most simple hosts, but complex routes will confuse it.
--reusecache  ..........  don't re-read the dirs; re-use the existing caches
--email [s]  .....................  email address to send completion message
                                      (requires working mail system on host)
--barefiles   .....  set to allow rsync of individual files, as oppo to dirs
--nowait  ................  for scripting, sleep for a few s instead of wait
--version  .................................  dumps version string and exits
--help  .........................................................  this help

Examples
========
-- Good example 1 --
% parsync  --maxload=5.5 --NP=4 --startdir='/home/hjm' dir1 dir2 dir3
hjm@remotehost:~/backups

where
  = "--startdir='/home/hjm'" sets the working dir of this operation to
      '/home/hjm' and dir1 dir2 dir3 are subdirs from '/home/hjm'
  = the target "hjm@remotehost:~/backups" is the same target rsync would use
  = "--NP=4" forks 4 instances of rsync
  = -"-maxload=5.5" will start suspending rsync instances when the 5m system
      load gets to 5.5 and then unsuspending them when it goes below it.

  It uses 4 instances to rsync dir1 dir2 dir3 to hjm@remotehost:~/backups

-- Good example 2 --
% parsync --rsyncopts="--ignore-existing" --reusecache  --NP=3
  --barefiles  *.txt   /mount/backups/txt

where
  =  "--rsyncopts='--ignore-existing'" is an option passed thru to rsync
     telling it not to disturb any existing files in the target directory.
  = "--reusecache" indicates that the filecache shouldn't be re-generated,
    uses the previous filecache in ~/.parsync
  = "--NP=3" for 3 copies of rsync (with no "--maxload", the default is 4)
  = "--barefiles" indicates that it's OK to transfer barefiles instead of
    recursing thru dirs.
  = "/mount/backups/txt" is the target - a local disk mount instead of a network host.

  It uses 3 instances to rsync *.txt from the current dir to "/mount/backups/txt".

-- Error Example 1 --
% pwd
/home/hjm  # executing parsync from here

% parsync --NP4 --compress /usr/local  /media/backupdisk

why this is an error:
  = '--NP4' is not an option (parsync will say "Unknown option: np4")
    It should be '--NP=4'
  = if you were trying to rsync '/usr/local' to '/media/backupdisk',
    it will fail since there is no /home/hjm/usr/local dir to use as
    a source. This will be shown in the log files in
    ~/.parsync/rsync-logfile-<datestamp>_#
    as a spew of "No such file or directory (2)" errors
  = the '--compress' is a native rsync option, not a native parsync option.
    You have to pass it to rsync with "--rsyncopts='--compress'"

The correct version of the above command is:

% parsync --NP=4  --rsyncopts='--compress' --startdir=/usr  local
/media/backupdisk

-- Error Example 2 --
% parsync --start-dir /home/hjm  mooslocal  hjm@moo.boo.yoo.com:/usr/local

why this is an error:
  = this command is trying to PULL data from a remote SOURCE to a
    local TARGET.  parsync doesn't support that kind of operation yet.

The correct version of the above command is:

# ssh to hjm@moo, install parsync, then:
% parsync  --startdir=/usr  local  hjm@remote:/home/hjm/mooslocal

[Jun 02, 2018] Parallelise rsync using GNU Parallel

Jun 02, 2018 | unix.stackexchange.com

up vote 7 down vote favorite 4


Mandar Shinde ,Mar 13, 2015 at 6:51

I have been using a rsync script to synchronize data at one host with the data at another host. The data has numerous small-sized files that contribute to almost 1.2TB.

In order to sync those files, I have been using rsync command as follows:

rsync -avzm --stats --human-readable --include-from proj.lst /data/projects REMOTEHOST:/data/

The contents of proj.lst are as follows:

+ proj1
+ proj1/*
+ proj1/*/*
+ proj1/*/*/*.tar
+ proj1/*/*/*.pdf
+ proj2
+ proj2/*
+ proj2/*/*
+ proj2/*/*/*.tar
+ proj2/*/*/*.pdf
...
...
...
- *

As a test, I picked up two of those projects (8.5GB of data) and I executed the command above. Being a sequential process, it tool 14 minutes 58 seconds to complete. So, for 1.2TB of data it would take several hours.

If I would could multiple rsync processes in parallel (using & , xargs or parallel ), it would save my time.

I tried with below command with parallel (after cd ing to source directory) and it took 12 minutes 37 seconds to execute:

parallel --will-cite -j 5 rsync -avzm --stats --human-readable {} REMOTEHOST:/data/ ::: .

This should have taken 5 times less time, but it didn't. I think, I'm going wrong somewhere.

How can I run multiple rsync processes in order to reduce the execution time?

Ole Tange ,Mar 13, 2015 at 7:25

Are you limited by network bandwidth? Disk iops? Disk bandwidth? – Ole Tange Mar 13 '15 at 7:25

Mandar Shinde ,Mar 13, 2015 at 7:32

If possible, we would want to use 50% of total bandwidth. But, parallelising multiple rsync s is our first priority. – Mandar Shinde Mar 13 '15 at 7:32

Ole Tange ,Mar 13, 2015 at 7:41

Can you let us know your: Network bandwidth, disk iops, disk bandwidth, and the bandwidth actually used? – Ole Tange Mar 13 '15 at 7:41

Mandar Shinde ,Mar 13, 2015 at 7:47

In fact, I do not know about above parameters. For the time being, we can neglect the optimization part. Multiple rsync s in parallel is the primary focus now. – Mandar Shinde Mar 13 '15 at 7:47

Mandar Shinde ,Apr 11, 2015 at 13:53

Following steps did the job for me:
  1. Run the rsync --dry-run first in order to get the list of files those would be affected.

rsync -avzm --stats --safe-links --ignore-existing --dry-run --human-readable /data/projects REMOTE-HOST:/data/ > /tmp/transfer.log

  1. I fed the output of cat transfer.log to parallel in order to run 5 rsync s in parallel, as follows:

cat /tmp/transfer.log | parallel --will-cite -j 5 rsync -avzm --relative --stats --safe-links --ignore-existing --human-readable {} REMOTE-HOST:/data/ > result.log

Here, --relative option ( link ) ensured that the directory structure for the affected files, at the source and destination, remains the same (inside /data/ directory), so the command must be run in the source folder (in example, /data/projects ).

Sandip Bhattacharya ,Nov 17, 2016 at 21:22

That would do an rsync per file. It would probably be more efficient to split up the whole file list using split and feed those filenames to parallel. Then use rsync's --files-from to get the filenames out of each file and sync them. rm backups.* split -l 3000 backup.list backups. ls backups.* | parallel --line-buffer --verbose -j 5 rsync --progress -av --files-from {} /LOCAL/PARENT/PATH/ REMOTE_HOST:REMOTE_PATH/ – Sandip Bhattacharya Nov 17 '16 at 21:22

Mike D ,Sep 19, 2017 at 16:42

How does the second rsync command handle the lines in result.log that are not files? i.e. receiving file list ... done created directory /data/ . – Mike D Sep 19 '17 at 16:42

Cheetah ,Oct 12, 2017 at 5:31

On newer versions of rsync (3.1.0+), you can use --info=name in place of -v , and you'll get just the names of the files and directories. You may want to use --protect-args to the 'inner' transferring rsync too if any files might have spaces or shell metacharacters in them. – Cheetah Oct 12 '17 at 5:31

Mikhail ,Apr 10, 2017 at 3:28

I would strongly discourage anybody from using the accepted answer, a better solution is to crawl the top level directory and launch a proportional number of rync operations.

I have a large zfs volume and my source was was a cifs mount. Both are linked with 10G, and in some benchmarks can saturate the link. Performance was evaluated using zpool iostat 1 .

The source drive was mounted like:

mount -t cifs -o username=,password= //static_ip/70tb /mnt/Datahoarder_Mount/ -o vers=3.0

Using a single rsync process:

rsync -h -v -r -P -t /mnt/Datahoarder_Mount/ /StoragePod

the io meter reads:

StoragePod  30.0T   144T      0  1.61K      0   130M
StoragePod  30.0T   144T      0  1.61K      0   130M
StoragePod  30.0T   144T      0  1.62K      0   130M

This in synthetic benchmarks (crystal disk), performance for sequential write approaches 900 MB/s which means the link is saturated. 130MB/s is not very good, and the difference between waiting a weekend and two weeks.

So, I built the file list and tried to run the sync again (I have a 64 core machine):

cat /home/misha/Desktop/rsync_logs_syncs/Datahoarder_Mount.log | parallel --will-cite -j 16 rsync -avzm --relative --stats --safe-links --size-only --human-readable {} /StoragePod/ > /home/misha/Desktop/rsync_logs_syncs/Datahoarder_Mount_result.log

and it had the same performance!

StoragePod  29.9T   144T      0  1.63K      0   130M
StoragePod  29.9T   144T      0  1.62K      0   130M
StoragePod  29.9T   144T      0  1.56K      0   129M

As an alternative I simply ran rsync on the root folders:

rsync -h -v -r -P -t /mnt/Datahoarder_Mount/Mikhail/Marcello_zinc_bone /StoragePod/Marcello_zinc_bone
rsync -h -v -r -P -t /mnt/Datahoarder_Mount/Mikhail/fibroblast_growth /StoragePod/fibroblast_growth
rsync -h -v -r -P -t /mnt/Datahoarder_Mount/Mikhail/QDIC /StoragePod/QDIC
rsync -h -v -r -P -t /mnt/Datahoarder_Mount/Mikhail/sexy_dps_cell /StoragePod/sexy_dps_cell

This actually boosted performance:

StoragePod  30.1T   144T     13  3.66K   112K   343M
StoragePod  30.1T   144T     24  5.11K   184K   469M
StoragePod  30.1T   144T     25  4.30K   196K   373M

In conclusion, as @Sandip Bhattacharya brought up, write a small script to get the directories and parallel that. Alternatively, pass a file list to rsync. But don't create new instances for each file.

Julien Palard ,May 25, 2016 at 14:15

I personally use this simple one:
ls -1 | parallel rsync -a {} /destination/directory/

Which only is usefull when you have more than a few non-near-empty directories, else you'll end up having almost every rsync terminating and the last one doing all the job alone.

Ole Tange ,Mar 13, 2015 at 7:25

A tested way to do the parallelized rsync is: http://www.gnu.org/software/parallel/man.html#EXAMPLE:-Parallelizing-rsync

rsync is a great tool, but sometimes it will not fill up the available bandwidth. This is often a problem when copying several big files over high speed connections.

The following will start one rsync per big file in src-dir to dest-dir on the server fooserver:

cd src-dir; find . -type f -size +100000 | \
parallel -v ssh fooserver mkdir -p /dest-dir/{//}\; \
  rsync -s -Havessh {} fooserver:/dest-dir/{}

The directories created may end up with wrong permissions and smaller files are not being transferred. To fix those run rsync a final time:

rsync -Havessh src-dir/ fooserver:/dest-dir/

If you are unable to push data, but need to pull them and the files are called digits.png (e.g. 000000.png) you might be able to do:

seq -w 0 99 | parallel rsync -Havessh fooserver:src/*{}.png destdir/

Mandar Shinde ,Mar 13, 2015 at 7:34

Any other alternative in order to avoid find ? – Mandar Shinde Mar 13 '15 at 7:34

Ole Tange ,Mar 17, 2015 at 9:20

Limit the -maxdepth of find. – Ole Tange Mar 17 '15 at 9:20

Mandar Shinde ,Apr 10, 2015 at 3:47

If I use --dry-run option in rsync , I would have a list of files that would be transferred. Can I provide that file list to parallel in order to parallelise the process? – Mandar Shinde Apr 10 '15 at 3:47

Ole Tange ,Apr 10, 2015 at 5:51

cat files | parallel -v ssh fooserver mkdir -p /dest-dir/{//}\; rsync -s -Havessh {} fooserver:/dest-dir/{} – Ole Tange Apr 10 '15 at 5:51

Mandar Shinde ,Apr 10, 2015 at 9:49

Can you please explain the mkdir -p /dest-dir/{//}\; part? Especially the {//} thing is a bit confusing. – Mandar Shinde Apr 10 '15 at 9:49

,

For multi destination syncs, I am using
parallel rsync -avi /path/to/source ::: host1: host2: host3:

Hint: All ssh connections are established with public keys in ~/.ssh/authorized_keys

[Jun 02, 2018] Parallelizing rsync

Jun 02, 2018 | www.gnu.org

rsync is a great tool, but sometimes it will not fill up the available bandwidth. This is often a problem when copying several big files over high speed connections.

The following will start one rsync per big file in src-dir to dest-dir on the server fooserver :

  cd src-dir; find . -type f -size +100000 | \
    parallel -v ssh fooserver mkdir -p /dest-dir/{//}\; \
      rsync -s -Havessh {} fooserver:/dest-dir/{}

The dirs created may end up with wrong permissions and smaller files are not being transferred. To fix those run rsync a final time:

  rsync -Havessh src-dir/ fooserver:/dest-dir/

If you are unable to push data, but need to pull them and the files are called digits.png (e.g. 000000.png) you might be able to do:

  seq -w 0 99 | parallel rsync -Havessh fooserver:src/*{}.png destdir/

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