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May the source be with you, but remember the KISS principle ;-)
Contents Bulletin Scripting in shell and Perl Network troubleshooting History Humor

Best books for learning HTML

News Selected Computer Books Classic Computer Books  Best Books about Microsoft FrontPage Javascript MySql Database Programming
Cascading Style Sheets Reference  Best Perl Books Apache Web Server CGI Scripting XML
Blogs and Wikis LAMP Bookshelf Best books about Regular Expressions Unix Network Administration Firewalls Best Red Hat Books
Perl Wiki as a System Administrator Tool AWStats LAMP Stack as new program development paradigm CD Bookshelf Humor Etc

Introduction

In the early í90ís, when Tim Berners-Lee created HTML, there was no formal HTML 1.0 specification written and, despite the similarities in syntax,  HTML was not formally based on SGML.

Work continued over the next few years and in 1995, HTML 2.0 was published as RFC 1866 which formally defined HTML as an application of SGML.  However, browsers still didnít bother to implement SGML parsers and, even at this early stage, many proprietary extensions were starting to appear.

From around 1996, the browser wars were in full swing.  There were multiple proprietary extensions from Netscape and Microsoft.   This eventually became widely known as ďTag SoupĒ.  In an effort to standardize this mess, the W3C published HTML 3.2 in í97 and 4.0 in the following year. After HTML 4.01 was published at the end of í99 to resolve a few minor issues. It became standard de-facto and still many sites use this level of HTML.

W3C HTML Working Group published XHTML standard then but it was met with mixed success.  Over the years, Apple, Mozilla and Opera were becoming increasingly concerned about the W3Cís direction with XHTML and apparent disregard for the needs of real-world authors. So, in 2004, led by Ian Hickson, these organizations set out to with a mission to meet the needs of both users and developers; and the Web Hypertext Application Technology Working Group was born. They've been planning and working on 3 separate specifications: Web Applications 1.0, Web Forms 2.0 and Web Controls 1.0.  Together, these 3 specs form what is collectively known as HTML 5.

On the most basic level HTML usually means HTML 3.2 or HTML+CSS. Future of HTML probably includes move to HTML 5 but the legacy web pages represent serious issue and slow down any progress.

Javascript+HTML can do some amazing things. You can move images using the keyboard, that created a possibility of programming games like Tetris.  For more complex examples see Javascript books.

As a lot of HTML now is generated programmatically the progress slowed to a crawl approximately 10 years ago and older version of HTML are prevalent. In this sense older books can be used successfully for study. O'Reilly was the most active in publishing collections of books on CD, although he tries not to include most popular and most profitable books. Still O'Reilly published more than 30 books in HTML format.  That means that  O'Reilly CD Bookshelf series has a lot of value. It is a discontinued product that can be bought cheap.

One way to compare HTML books is to compare the supporing Web sites that authors put for the book.

Learning Web Design A Beginner's Guide to HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and Web Graphics by Jennifer Niederst Robbins

Learning Web Design A Beginner's Guide to HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and Web Graphics by  Jennifer Niederst Robbins

The companion website for this book is learningwebdesign.com. It features materials for the exercises, downloadable articles, lists of links from the book, book references, etc.
Errata is available from Confirmed Errata O'Reilly Media
From Amazon review: "The book tells you not only how to do stuff, it tells you why and when it is right to do so. Proportionally speaking, if the book were 11 pages, you get 1 page for introduction, 3 for HTML, 5 for CSS and 2 for javascript. The book focuses on the important stuff, and says what is good on each. You can always learn the material online via web search, copying examples, etc, but it will take a while to grasp the 'why' of its intended usage."

Paperback: 624 pages
Publisher: O'Reilly Media; Fourth Edition edition (August 24, 2012)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1449319270
ISBN-13: 978-1449319274
Product Dimensions: 8 x 1.3 x 9.8 inches
Shipping Weight: 3.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)

ByB. Caraway on December 6, 2012

The Perfect textbook for my Intro to HTML & CSS classes.

I teach several classes at a community college and this will be the textbook that I now recommend all of my students purchase.

 it is a beautiful book with plenty of hands-on examples. Ms. Robbins certainly knows her stuff when it comes to explaining the web and its many facets - I heard her recently on the Web Ahead podcast [...] and was very impressed with her knowledge and her delivery on that show. In fact, I purchased the book based on that and now I am glad I did.

Boanerges Aleman-Meza on October 9, 2012

It tells you not only how to do stuff, it tells you why and when it is right to do so

The book tells you not only how to do stuff, it tells you why and when it is right to do so. Proportionally speaking, if the book were 11 pages, you get 1 page for introduction, 3 for HTML, 5 for CSS and 2 for javascript. The book focuses on the important stuff, and says what is good on each. You can always learn the material online via web search, copying examples, etc, but it will take a while to grasp the 'why' of its intended usage.

If you already know some of the material and want a refresher on the latest (such as HTML5), simply go to the 'test yourself' section at the end of each chapter. The core of the book is the HTML and CSS content. It nicely explains what it's new in HTML5.

The book is big and pretty, in the same way that you can learn genetics online, we all know that the best is to get a genetics book and read through it. Similarly here, you wont regret getting the hard-copy, it is similar to a traditional college book (definitely less pricey than a genetics book). The reader can be a newbie or skilled person in web page design. Newbie will learn in a 'clean' way, the skilled person will refresh/learn how to correctly use HTML5 tags and CSS.

Disclaimer: I was provided with a copy of the book from O'Reilly for review.

Chrison September 20, 2013

Excellent coverage of web design!

I just completed reading this text and I thoroughly enjoyed it. The text reads very well. I like how emphasis is placed upon actually typing code in by hand, as that is the only way to truly learn how to write code, which is a major part of web design. After learning how to actually write HTML/CSS/JavaScript, then you can use advanced tools to work faster, knowing what the generated code does.

I love the manufacturing of the text itself, as well as the layout. The book has nice color pages and very clearly illustrates what is explained in text. The format of this text is awesome too. The sidebars are very helpful as well. Examples are distributed throughout the text with test questions at the end of each chapter to reinforce what you learned.

I am very happy to see the detailed explanations of CSS selectors, as well as the positioning of elements. For example, how to position an 'absolute' element by making the parent element 'relative'.

Anyway, I recommend this text to anyone who wants to learn web development. If you are a beginner this text shows you how to learn HTML, CSS, and JavaScript from the start. If you have a few years under your belt, I still recommend this text to fill in any gaps you may have missed - as was the case with myself.

This book is a keeper! It sits right next to my computer.

Two additional chapters that did not make it to the book  are available from the Web site for free:

Teach Yourself Web Publishing with HTML and CSS in One Hour a Day by Laura Lemay  & Rafe Colburn

A very good introductory textbook (that I used to teach students in my classes) are books by Laura Lemay. They exist in multiple editions and have different co-authors but typically quality is pretty high.  Actually those that cover HTML 4 and are published after 2010 are OK. Among them a the best is probably    Sams Teach Yourself Web Publishing with HTML and CSS in One Hour a Day Includes New HTML5 Coverage (6th Edition) Laura Lemay

Sydney Selfon, February 11, 2014

This is the best technical documentation I've ever read.

I've seen a lot of documentation over the years, and I've written some too. This is a model of good documentation. I wish I could say that the systems I documented were done as well. It discusses what HTML does, how you get ready to write your code and describes HTML and CSS in a form that makes it easy to write your own

Unlike HTML and CSS Design and Build Websites by Jon Duckett it has one chapter on PHP. That of cause not enough to start programming in PHP but it gives you some idea how forms are interacting with the server using PHP language.

Teach Yourself Web Publishing with HTML & XHTML in 21 Days  by Laura Lemay  & Rafe Colburn

You can also use an older book by the same authors: Sams Teach Yourself Web Publishing with HTML & XHTML in 21 Days, Fourth Edition by Laura Lemay  & Rafe Colburn

Doug Keating (see more about me) from Bristow, VA United States
Excellent Book about HTML for Beginners, November 10, 2000

I bought this book to help sharpen my HTML skills for a web site project that I am currently working on for my Master's Degree.

Luckily, I made a great choice, because this book has helped me further develop my understanding of HTML in a very short timespan. I use this book more than the textbooks that our instructor assigned to us. I highly recommend the book to anyone looking for a book that can teach them HTML in less than a month.

I found the book easy to read, full of great examples, and very well suited to use as a reference guide. You will find yourself quickly building web publishing skills starting with the very basics, then moving on to tougher subject like using frames, inserting multi-media, creating forms, and other useful topics. My own personal copy is rough around the edges because I have used it so much during my project.

If you are looking for an easy way to learn a lot about HTML, but don't have the time or money to spend on a class, I recommend that you purchase this book. It is money well spent for those looking to expand your web publishing skills. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title

 

HTML and CSS Design and Build Websites by Jon Duckett

Those days the most popular is HTML and CSS Design and Build Websites by  Jon Duckett.  It has appeal because it is visually attractive. A very stylish book. The pages are nicely designed and printed on very heavy paper with big glossy pictures. The book is filled with extravagant pictures, images, and sleekly designed pages. There is white print on black pages, black print on blue pages, light blue print on glossy white pages -- it looks like graphic design exercises. Looks like trendy graphic design can attract a lot of positive reviews ;-)

Quality of content is less impressive.  The author have a very basic web site http://www.htmlandcssbook.com/  that contains code samples and 'extras & tools' but no errata. Which can be translated "I do not care". good thing about the web site is that along with downloadable code the author provide a couple off videos (see http://www.htmlandcssbook.com/extras/ ). The book does not provide a sample site that can serve as a start.

At the beginning this book takes a minimalist approach and basically just tells you about basic elements of the HTML and CSS using a simple example. So in a way this book belongs to  by example genre. But later author demonstrates his inability tt stay within this Spartan framework and start covering some embellishments that presumably does not belong to the very basic books for novices.

The main audience is the people who want to to learn hand-code HTML. I wish there are more such people who eventually become true code jockeys and move to programming, rather than relying on complex and frustrating tools that kinda let you do what you want. Good hand-coders are in high demand both in industry and education, and this book can help you to get there.

This is essentially a fancy illustrated introductory book that covered basics, but I would like to stress again that sometime the author deviates from the HTML basics and try to cover more complex staff  (and, of course, flops and there is not enough space for detailed coverage and superficial coverage does not count).  If you are the person who want to using hosting provider to create your own website this might be an OK book to start writing your own HTML in any text editor, but it does not teach how to structure the site and how to operate within hosting provider framework (cPanel interface). Also the author tend to pay too much attention to cosmetics.: actually tables are enough for a basic Website and you do not need all this fancy staff with div  and span tags and relative and absolute positions.  ) .

First three chapters are written  mostly using element available in HTML 3.2 (which is good !) but later the author adds some elements of XHTML and HTML 5. Some of them are really useful and that are used in modern web sites (although truth be told most modern sites have automatically generated HTML of horrible quality ;-). some are redundant on introductory level. also the format of the book dooms some chapter to be weak and difficult to comprehend. For example if it difficult to discuss form without at least discussing CGI (and the author stops at HTML level failing to explain how forms are processed -- this is a drawback but probably inevitable in the introductory book). 

In a sense the book is typical introductory book, while you see elements of HTML from which you can create a static site, as soon as you want something dynamic this book became utterly useless. 

Elements covered on the level slightly below the Laura Lemay book (and page wise the book is almost twice smaller 490 vs. 816 pages).  According to the author the book has been written for two categories of readers: people "who want to learn how to design and build websites from scratch" and those "who has a website but want more control over the appearance" or experience some difficulties with built-in format.

The book nicely illustrated (but why the author need to depict computer display each time when he needs to show how the page or element rendered is beyond me -- this is a drawback). It is  "HTML editor" agnostic -- the author recommends notepad and it does not use any particular HTML editor for illustration.  On Windows I would prefer using some free HTML editor from Microsoft (such as SharePoint Designer 2007), but that's a personal opinion.  I also disagree with some recommendation such as avoiding using width attribute in tables (and using CSS instead) but this is a  minor disagreement. 

It covered some element of multimedia on the basic level which gives the ability to include YouTube video in your page or use adobe MP3 player for audio,  but does it on very superficial level, without delving into any details (in this sense this is the same approach that was use for covering forms). 

The book covers some elements of CSS but it fails to explain when styles are needed and when to avoid them. And why they are needed.  This chapter is also somewhat superficial but additional material can be found in subsequent chapters. Funny but in this chapter and the chapter about color this annoying Dell display on the pictures changes from Dell to Mac ;-). I also disagree with the statement "If you design on a Mac, it is important to check what the typefaces look like on a PC because PCs can render type less smoothly." That's simply wrong.

After explaining basic elements it looks like the author does not know where to stop and makes a typical error (if not blunder) -- an attempt to cover too much in the introductory book deviating from from basic topics (e.g. tables, forms) into intermediate topics (e.g. absolute vs relative position, layers). That greatly diminishes the quality of the book.

In explaining typefaces the author does not clearly explained that typefaces should be available on the user computer and that severely limit your choice of fonts as beyond hypothesis that Windows or Mac computer will typically be used you can say little about their availability. for example on Windows if Microsoft Office installed then selection of typefaces is wider then on plain-vanilla Windows but you can't count on that).

I would also warn that the author prefer too much cosmetics. I personally prefer Spartan site and think that content is the king. You can't hide absence of good content with any design tricks.

The chapter about site design is badly written because the best way to design site is to respond to your viewers preferences and popularity of particular pages. The author does not show how to do that until later chapter about Google analytic (and Google analytics is a horrible choice ;-) 

It is much better to use Web site analysis program such as AWStats that is typically provided by your hosting provider (see Guide for selecting Web hosting provider with SSH access) then Google analytics which is a very perverted way of getting information about your pages and which creates additional useless load on your site. Also you essentially handle to Google IPs of all your visitors.

In addition to this book you need some books about cPanel to start. (cPanel is used as the WEB interface by most web hosting providers). See for example:


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NEWS CONTENTS

Old News ;-)

[Oct 24, 2015] HTML and CSS Design and Build Websites by Jon Duckett

From Amazon review: "I admired Duckett's approach to this book. He completely dispels with the buzzwords that glitter so many books these days."
Code is available from http://www.htmlandcssbook.com/code/
According to the author the book has been written for two categories of readers: people "who want to learn how to design and build websites from scratch" and those "who has a website but want more control over the appearance" or experience some difficulties with built-in format.
November 8, 2011 | Amazon.com

Paperback: 490 pages
Publisher: Wiley; 1 edition (November 8, 2011)
ISBN-10: 1118008189
ISBN-13: 978-1118008188
Product Dimensions: 7.4 x 1 x 9.2 inches

Rebecca Haden VINE VOICE on January 19, 2012

Great for Beginners, or to Update Skills

I want to admire this book first as a book. People who want to learn how to make quilts or soups or jewelry have plenty of gorgeous books for inspiration, but books for people who want to make websites are often visually dull, even ugly. Duckett, when he fills a page with code, also gives you a photo of how that code will render on a monitor, and the pictures are just as nice as those glamor shots of butternut squash soup.

The whole book is attractively designed and laid out. It's also color coordinated so you can easily track down the turquoise(html) or hot pink (css) summaries or chocolate brown background info.

That background info is very nicely done. Each page spread is like a poster clarifying things like what exactly a left-angle bracket is or just exactly how forms work. Many books in the field assume that all their readers know this stuff already, and a book for web designers that spent much time on defining serif vs. sans-serif fonts would be frustrating for most designers. This book sequesters basic info so old hands can skip it and beginners can readily find it again, as well as making it clear and memorable.

Half the book examines HTML, looking at structure, text, links, images, tables, forms, "Extra Markeup" such as comments and metadata, and multimedia elements. Each element is explained clearly with good examples, and HTML5 is included. The presentation is economical and straightforward, but lots of information is included: things like animated gifs and how to communicate with older browsers aren't often included in books suited to beginners.

The second half of the book introduces CSS, HTML5 layout, and "Practical Information" like how to tell who's coming to your site and how to organize information into a website.

The author intends this book for people learning how to build websites (and it's certainly the best book I've seen to get you started) and for people who use a content management system like WordPress but want more control over their sites.

I think it also will be very useful for people who learned HTML and CSS in the past and want to get more up to date. We often see sites built with outdated code because the owners can't bring themselves to go through the learning process again. I get that -- I took a class in HTML and it was probably slightly less creative and exciting than basic statistics class. This book isn't like that. It's clear and enjoyable, and you can download all the code from the author's website if you really hate typing it.

I highly recommend this book.

[Aug 24, 2012] Learning Web Design A Beginner's Guide to HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and Web Graphics by Jennifer Niederst Robbins

The companion website for this book is learningwebdesign.com. It features materials for the exercises, downloadable articles, lists of links from the book, book references, etc.

From Amazon review: "The book tells you not only how to do stuff, it tells you why and when it is right to do so. Proportionally speaking, if the book were 11 pages, you get 1 page for introduction, 3 for HTML, 5 for CSS and 2 for javascript. The book focuses on the important stuff, and says what is good on each. You can always learn the material online via web search, copying examples, etc, but it will take a while to grasp the 'why' of its intended usage."

Paperback: 624 pages
Publisher: O'Reilly Media; Fourth Edition edition (August 24, 2012)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1449319270
ISBN-13: 978-1449319274
Product Dimensions: 8 x 1.3 x 9.8 inches
Shipping Weight: 3.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)

Jennifer Niederst Robbins was one of the first designers for the Web. As the designer of O'Reilly's Global Network Navigator (GNN), the first commercial web site, she has been designing for the Web since 1993. She is the author of the bestselling "Web Design in a Nutshell" (O'Reilly), and has taught web design at the Massachusetts College of Art in Boston and Johnson and Wales University in Providence. She has spoken at major design and Internet events including SXSW Interactive, Seybold Seminars, the GRAFILL conference (Geilo, Norway), and one of the first W3C International Expos.

ByB. Caraway on December 6, 2012

The Perfect textbook for my Intro to HTML & CSS classes.

I teach several classes at a community college and this will be the textbook that I now recommend all of my students purchase.

it is a beautiful book with plenty of hands-on examples. Ms. Robbins certainly knows her stuff when it comes to explaining the web and its many facets - I heard her recently on the Web Ahead podcast [...] and was very impressed with her knowledge and her delivery on that show. In fact, I purchased the book based on that and now I am glad I did.

Boanerges Aleman-Meza on October 9, 2012

It tells you not only how to do stuff, it tells you why and when it is right to do so

The book tells you not only how to do stuff, it tells you why and when it is right to do so. Proportionally speaking, if the book were 11 pages, you get 1 page for introduction, 3 for HTML, 5 for CSS and 2 for javascript. The book focuses on the important stuff, and says what is good on each. You can always learn the material online via web search, copying examples, etc, but it will take a while to grasp the 'why' of its intended usage.

If you already know some of the material and want a refresher on the latest (such as HTML5), simply go to the 'test yourself' section at the end of each chapter. The core of the book is the HTML and CSS content. It nicely explains what it's new in HTML5.

HTML5: the book tells you what to do for browsers that do not support HTML5. It is to the point in just what you need to know. It includes enough for the video tag but not too much. If you need to go deep into canvas tag, get another book.

CSS: the book gives you strategies for page layout, and covers nice stuff such as round corners, transitions, transformations, animations. Finally I was able to fully understand a number of CSS techniques that I have used in my sites.

JavaScript: the book covers enough to practically know what it is and why you may have to learn it in the future. If you need to go deep in JavaScript, get another book. Lastly, a small chapter on web graphics is what I consider 'filler' content for people that know nothing about image formats.

The book is big and pretty, in the same way that you can learn genetics online, we all know that the best is to get a genetics book and read through it. Similarly here, you wont regret getting the hard-copy, it is similar to a traditional college book (definitely less pricey than a genetics book). The reader can be a newbie or skilled person in web page design. Newbie will learn in a 'clean' way, the skilled person will refresh/learn how to correctly use HTML5 tags and CSS.

Disclaimer: I was provided with a copy of the book from O'Reilly for review.

Chrison September 20, 2013

Excellent coverage of web design!

I just completed reading this text and I thoroughly enjoyed it. The text reads very well. I like how emphasis is placed upon actually typing code in by hand, as that is the only way to truly learn how to write code, which is a major part of web design. After learning how to actually write HTML/CSS/JavaScript, then you can use advanced tools to work faster, knowing what the generated code does.

I love the manufacturing of the text itself, as well as the layout. The book has nice color pages and very clearly illustrates what is explained in text. The format of this text is awesome too. The sidebars are very helpful as well. Examples are distributed throughout the text with test questions at the end of each chapter to reinforce what you learned.

I am very happy to see the detailed explanations of CSS selectors, as well as the positioning of elements. For example, how to position an 'absolute' element by making the parent element 'relative'.

Anyway, I recommend this text to anyone who wants to learn web development. If you are a beginner this text shows you how to learn HTML, CSS, and JavaScript from the start. If you have a few years under your belt, I still recommend this text to fill in any gaps you may have missed - as was the case with myself.

This book is a keeper! It sits right next to my computer.

[Sep 3, 2010] Sams Teach Yourself Web Publishing with HTML and CSS in One Hour a Day by Laura Lemay

This book's code download is 1.2 megabytes
Sydney Selfon, February 11, 2014

This is the best technical documentation I've ever read.

I've seen a lot of documentation over the years, and I've written some too. This is a model of good documentation. I wish I could say that the systems I documented were done as well. It discusses what HTML does, how you get ready to write your code and describes HTML and CSS in a form that makes it easy to write your own

Timothy Walker VINE VOICE on January 25, 2011

An Excellent Tutorial Diminished By Poor Editing

Laura Lemay has been writing "Teach Yourself" titles on web development topics for more than 15 years now, several of which I have read, enjoyed, and learned from. Having finished this updated edition of her "Web Publishing", I am happy to recommend it to HTML novices, but not without criticism and caveats.

THE GOOD: The first two parts of the book constitute a solid HTML primer written in a friendly, "only as technical as is necessary" style, moving into more complex web programming topics in later chapters. Best practices and compliance with the emerging HTML5 standard are emphasized throughout the short self-study lessons. Further, the closing sections of the book provide sound "real world" advice on topics like hosting, marketing, and publishing platforms.

THE IFFY: I felt that CSS was introduced rather clumsily, as if the authors took their old HTML 3.2 lessons and swapped in CSS code for the deprecated visual markup tags. Will confused newcomers persevere until Lesson 13 when the big picture is finally explained?

THE NOT-SO-GOOD: Visiting my local bookstore confirmed that the minor (but fairly frequent) syntax and spelling errors were not confined to my review copy. Less forgivable is the reference to Appendix B, "HTML Quick Reference", on page 150. Appendix B does not exist.

BOTTOM LINE: On page 538, the authors state that "visitors aren't going to have much patience if your web page is poorly organized or full of spelling errors." Again on page 543, "Spelling errors and bad grammar reflect badly on you, on your work, and on the content you're describing. It may be irritating enough that your visitors won't bother to delve any deeper... even if the subject you're writing about is fascinating." Applying these stated standards to the book, I would encourage Ms. Lemay and Mr. Colburn to demand an apology from their publisher.

[May 14, 2003] Sams Teach Yourself Web Publishing with HTML 4 in 21 Days

A very good textbook. Used books are very cheap. Some review might be staged, but still to get 14 5-star reviews is an achievement in itself ;-) I doubt the Laura Lemay wrote this edition ;-). Looks like ghost-writing.
Excellent Book about HTML for Beginners, November 10, 2000
Doug Keating (see more about me) from Bristow, VA United States

I bought this book to help sharpen my HTML skills for a web site project that I am currently working on for my Master's Degree. Luckily, I made a great choice, because this book has helped me further develop my understanding of HTML in a very short timespan. I use this book more than the textbooks that our instructor assigned to us. I highly recommend the book to anyone looking for a book that can teach them HTML in less than a month.

I found the book easy to read, full of great examples, and very well suited to use as a reference guide. You will find yourself quickly building web publishing skills starting with the very basics, then moving on to tougher subject like using frams, inserting multi-media, creating forms, and other useful topics. My own personal copy is rough around the edges because I have used it so much during my project.

If you are looking for an easy way to learn a lot about HTML, but don't have the time or money to spend on a class, I recommend that you purchase this book. It is money well spent for those looking to expand your web publishing skills. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title

Table of Contents


Introduction
Part 1: Getting Started
Day 1: The World of the World Wide Web
Day 2: Get Organized
Day 3: An Introduction to HTML
Part 2: Creating Simple Web Pages
Day 4: Begin with the Basics
Day 5: All About Links
Day 6: More Text Formatting with HTML
Part 3: Web Graphics
Day 7: Using Images, Color, and Backgrounds
Day 8: Creating Images for the Web
Day 9: Creating Animated Graphics
Part 4: Style Sheets, Tables, and Frames
Day 10: Style Sheets
Day 11: Tables
Day 12: Frames and Linked Windows
Part 5: Multimedia and Java Applets
Day 13: Multimedia: Adding Sound, Video, and More
Day 14: Working with Sound and Video Files
Day 15: Using Java
Part 6: Imagemaps and Forms
Day 16: Creating and Using Imagemaps
Day 17: Designing Forms
Day 18: Beginning CGI Scripting
Part 7: JavaScript and Dynamic HTML
Day 19: Creating JavaScript Scripts
Day 20: Working with JavaScript
Day 21: Using Dynamic HTML
Part 8: Designing Effective Web Pages
Day 22: Writing and Designing Web Pages: Dos and Don'ts
Day 23: Examples of Good and Bad Web Design
Day 24: Designing for the Real World
Part 9: Going Live on the Web
Day 25: Putting Your Site Online
Day 26: Letting People Know It's There
Day 27: Testing, Revising, and Maintaining Your Site
Part 10: Setting Up and Administering a Web Server
Day 28: Setting Up Your Own Server
Day 29: Web Server Hints, Tricks, and Tips
Day 30: Web Server Security and Access Control
Appendix A: Sources for Further Information
Appendix B: HTML 4.0 Reference
Appendix C: Cross-Browser Reference Table
Appendix D: Cascading Style Sheet (CSS) Reference
Appendix E: JavaScript Reference
Appendix F: Character Entities
Appendix G: Colors By Name and Hexadecimal Value
Appendix H: MIME Types and File Extensions
Index
4 out of 5 stars Excellent Resource for Beginner/Intermediate, August 1, 2000
Reviewer: Brian Baute (see more about me) from Elon College, NC USA
I've come back to this volume again and again in my work as a professional webmaster. It's great for those just beginning to work with HTML or those like me who have a strong grasp of HTML but have some gaps in our knowledge. The index is thorough and helpful, and the examples are clear and concise.

Where it does come up lacking, though, is when you get off the beaten path with your HTML work - trying to do non-standard things, for instance. This book is not for advanced HTML tricks - it's for fundamentals. It does an excellent job at what it set out to do - couple it with an advanced HTML programming reference (from Que or Sybex, for example) and you'll have almost all your HTML bases covered. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

4 out of 5 stars Teach Yourself Web Publishing with HTML 4 in 21 Days, March 23, 2000
Reviewer: Mark C. from Orlando, FL, USA
I specified this book to teach a Web Site Design class. I really liked the "Teach Yourself HTML 3.0" book, so I decided to use this one. It has a lot of information presented in a very methodical manner. It's not as visually pleasing as the previous version though, nor does it have color illustrations. Great desk reference!

4 out of 5 stars A Good HTML Reference with a Few Exceptions, July 16, 1999
Reviewer: A reader from St. Louis, Missouri
Provides a good overview to web page development using HTML 4. Some issues with the book, however: HTML reference was printed to conserve space rather than to enhanced readability - making it very hard to read. Should have been split up into one page per major item rather than letting one topic spill onto the page of another. But covers all of the major topics involved in web page publishing - so is a good starting point for serious beginners. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

2 out of 5 stars Lacks on carefulness, June 20, 1999
Reviewer: suurhoff@hotmail.com from Amsterdam, Netherlands
This book is an easy to follow manual on HTML 4, even containing some interesting items that go beyond it. A major problem however is the number of inconsistencies made by the author which annoyed me no end. These are not printing errors since the author clearly acts against her own rules. The next edition should be checked thoroughly, this time by an editor having some basic knowledge on what this book is all about.

[May 14, 2003] Sams Teach Yourself Web Publishing with HTML & XHTML in 21 Days, Fourth Edition by Laura Lemay (Author), Rafe Colburn (Author)

A very good textbook. Used is very cheap. Some review might be staged, but still to get 14 5-star reviews is an achievement in itself ;-) I doubt the Laura Lemay wrote this edition ;-). Looks like ghost-writing.
Doug Keating (see more about me) from Bristow, VA United States
Excellent Book about HTML for Beginners, November 10, 2000 I bought this book to help sharpen my HTML skills for a web site project that I am currently working on for my Master's Degree.

Luckily, I made a great choice, because this book has helped me further develop my understanding of HTML in a very short timespan. I use this book more than the textbooks that our instructor assigned to us. I highly recommend the book to anyone looking for a book that can teach them HTML in less than a month.

I found the book easy to read, full of great examples, and very well suited to use as a reference guide. You will find yourself quickly building web publishing skills starting with the very basics, then moving on to tougher subject like using frames, inserting multi-media, creating forms, and other useful topics. My own personal copy is rough around the edges because I have used it so much during my project.

If you are looking for an easy way to learn a lot about HTML, but don't have the time or money to spend on a class, I recommend that you purchase this book. It is money well spent for those looking to expand your web publishing skills. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title

[Oct 20, 1999] HTML 4 for the World Wide Web: Visual QuickStart Guide by Elizabeth Castro

This is a decent and definitely inexpensive book for beginners. The main advantage is that illustration can help you see the effects of the tags. Other then that bokk is so-so. Amazing number of positive reviews on Amazon is a lemmings effect ;-).
Paperback / Published 1998
Amazon price: $14.36 ~ You Save: $3.59 (20%)

Paperback - 384 pages 4th edition (October 20, 1999)
Peachpit Press; ISBN: 0201354934 ; Dimensions (in inches): 0.74 x 8.91 x 6.97
Amazon.com Sales Rank: 58
Avg. Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
Number of Reviews: 234

4 out of 5 starsExcellent start for beginners, very reader friendly. April 25, 2000

Reviewer: Jay (see more about me) from Canada

As a professional web developer, I rarely read the visual quick start guide series. I come across this book when I start to teach some novice web programmers. To my surprise, this book is so concise and is quite different from many HTML books. The author introduces the major features of HTML 4 and web development in a very reader friendly and fun tutorial. Readers will not find web development is not a dry and tedious task. Take a look at the table of contents link on the left hand side and you will see the topics being covered in it.

I think it is an excellent start if you don't know that much about HTML 4 and found traditional books a little bit too boring to get start. It covers all the essentials and briefly introduce the future, XML. It is an inexpensive book too. However if you are looking for an in-depth reference, you can take a look at "HTML: The Definite Guide". If you are serious about web programming after reading these two books, read Wrox Publication's ASP, e-commerce, databases and XML series.

5 out of 5 stars A great "how to" book! March 5, 2000 Reviewer: Midwest Book Review (see more about me) from Oregon, Wisconsin

A few weeks ago I developed a simple strategy for evaluating how-to books about technology. Books about computers should: 1) weigh less than a gallon of milk; 2) cost less than twenty dollars; 3) be updated yearly; 4) come with some kind of technical support via a website or an author email; and 5) Be clear, be clear, be clear. Books that comply with these requirements will achieve every author's dream of being good and popular at the same time. Elizabeth Castro writes books in this manner, and once again her HTML 4 For The World Wide Web (fourth edition) has found its way to the top of the bestseller lists for books about computers and the Internet.

The book covers all the important aspects of HTML 4, including the latest updates about Cascading Style Sheets, Level 2. Each chapter gets right to the point and teaches you how to do things: format text, make links, add multimedia, make tables, frames, and forms. You get a handy color chart on the back inside cover of the book; and a whole chapter called "Extras" that teaches lesser-known tricks such as how to password-protect a directory, soup up your mailto links, create buttons with tables, and create and automatic slide show. There are also chapters about scripts, the essentials of JavaScript, and how to get people to visit your page after you've published it on the Web.

The Visual Quickstart Guide format itself is an exemplary vehicle for Castro's instructional skills. Every page contains at least one diagram, so that the reader can SEE what's happening on their computer screen. All the lessons are divided into small bite-sized segments which are easy to digest. This strategy, known as "micro-uniting," has been proven to be the most effective way to teach. You can read the book straight through from start to finish, or you can use it as a reference book and jump in to any chapter. After each lesson, you may find yourself saying amazedly: "It's easy to do that!" In just a short time, working with this book, you'll be able to create useful, sophisticated and attractive effects on your web pages. Elizabeth Castro is one of those great how-to writers who anticipate your questions and thus make the learning process fast, efficient, and fun. HTML 4 For The World Wide Web is the ideal book to beginners who want to learn how to make web pages, and for intermediate-level users who want to give their web pages more features and a thoroughly professional look.

5 out of 5 stars An excellent HTML guide for all levels February 18, 2000

Reviewer: Rahul Das (see more about me) from Boston, USA

I am a java programmer who never really learnt HTML formally. I needed to learn it for a project, and I was looking for a book that starts with basics, but doesn't leave you hanging after just explaining some basic concepts. Great reviews prompted me to buy this book but when I received it, I was disappointed with the small size of the book. But after reading it, VOW! Make no mistake folks. This book beautifully covers everything in its small size which many other books cover in thousands of pages. An excellent tutorial, and even a better reference after you have read it once. Despite its small size, I can't think of a topic that has not been covered well in this book. Easy going language, and visual depiction of concepts, I have never written a review for books before this due to lack of time, but I had to review this one as I was so impressed. And at this price, it's a steal. Covers the latest HTML 4 version which should last for some years to come. Don't think twice, buy it now.

Old HTML 4 Books

Mastering HTML 4 Premium Edition
by Deborah S. Ray, Eric J. Ray. Hardcover (June 1999)
Amazon price:$34.99
You Save: $15.00 (30%)
Usually ships in 24 hours
Average Customer Review: 4 out of 5 stars
Hardcover - 1188 pages 1st & CD Rom edition (June 1999)
Sybex; ISBN: 0782125247 ; Dimensions (in inches): 2.88 x 9.35 x 7.95
Amazon.com Sales Rank: 15,051
Avg. Customer Review: 4 out of 5 stars
Number of Reviews: 10
*** Special Edition Using HTML 4, Sixth Edition
by Molly E. Holzschlag. Paperback
Amazon price:$31.99
You Save: $8.00 (20%)

Usually ships in 24 hours
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars

 
Paperback - 1109 pages 6th Bk&cdr edition (December 22, 1999)
Que; ISBN: 0789722674 ; Dimensions (in inches): 2.30 x 9.09 x 7.34
Amazon.com Sales Rank: 5,290
Avg. Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
Number of Reviews: 4
 
Html 4 Bible
by Bryan Pfaffenberger, Alexis D. Gutzman. Paperback (August 1998)

Our Price:$39.99
You Save: $10.00 (20%)

Usually ships in 24 hours
Average Customer Review: 4 out of 5 stars

Paperback - 903 pages Bk&Cd Rom edition (August 1998)
IDG Books Worldwide; ISBN: 0764532200 ; Dimensions (in inches): 1.83 x 9.23 x 7.38
Amazon.com Sales Rank: 7,831
Avg. Customer Review: 4 out of 5 stars
Number of Reviews: 17
 
A very good book on HTML! May 11, 1999
Reviewer: A reader from Pennsylvania, USA

I was learning HTML 3.2 and later found out this version of HTML was outdated. I also found out the newest version of HTML is 4.0, so I decided to look for a book on the 4.0 version of HTML instead of continuing to learn 3.2. I came across HTML 4 Bible, read the description, and read the reviews. After reading all of this, I decided to order the book. After reading the book, I would apply some of what I learn by practicing HTML 4 on my computer. After doing this, I was really impressed with HTML 4. I like this version a lot better than I like 3.2. People who are getting started with HTML will learn a lot easier with 4 than with any other version! The only thing I didn't like about the book, is that it did not cover enough basic JavaScript like I expected it to and the theory was kind of boring.

2 out of 5 stars Not what it's cracked up to be May 26, 1999
Reviewer: A reader from Portland, Oregon

After reading the entire book, I am very disappointed. The book is not at all what it claims to be. As I read it, I kept waiting...It seemed every chapter said "..(blank) will be covered more in depth later on.." But (blank) was never covered at all, or when it was covered it referred back to the original reference, which was of no help. Perhaps more upsetting were the grammatical and typographical errors made. Also extremely frustrating was the misinformation or conflicting information given. There were a couple of places where the authors talk about the support from different browsers for certain elements etc. that were contradicted later on. For example, in one place the author says a certain element is supported only by IE 4, and later says that same element is supported by Netscape 4 and IE 3 and 4. The editing of this book was very poor, and more research should have been done into the practical application of the information presented to avoid the inaccurate info. given. This book could have been about 1/4 the size for the useful information it contained. A lot of unnecessary junk was included and a lot of necessary information left out.

 


Cascading Style Sheets

***+ Html Stylesheet Sourcebook ~ Usually ships in 24 hours
Ian S. Graham / Paperback / Published 1997
Amazon price: $19.99 ~ You Save: $5.00 (20%)
Amazon.com Ian Graham Interview
Paperback - 352 pages (October 1997)
John Wiley & Sons; ISBN: 0471196649 ; Dimensions (in inches): 0.98 x 9.22 x 7.50
Amazon.com Sales Rank: 87,705
Avg. Customer Review: 4 out of 5 stars
Number of Reviews: 2

Slightly outdated (1997), but still useful.

4 out of 5 stars Graham comes through again April 7, 2000
Reviewer: Ariel Wolfer (see more about me) from DC

Graham is able to explain things quite easily if you have any questions. Rarely, however, could I find myself reading a book like this cover to cover. If you want to learn how to design in CSS, then this book can help you, but you could save some money and look for on-line resources. This book is best used as a reference tool and detailed information when you need to understand something better. It can help you become quite proficient.

On the plus side he is thorough and easy to understand, on the negative side, all of the pictures are black and white. "Cascading Style Sheets: Designing for the Web" by Lie and Bos has all color pictures, making certain examples more powerful in nature.

Bottom Line: Both books are highly recommended, but neither should be used for people just starting HTML. Be proficient in HTML before you get these books or you may be confused. I feel confident in CSS specs with these books as a resource.

*** Cascading Style Sheets, Second Edition Designing for the Web
Hakon Wium Lie, Bert Bos, Robert Cailliau
Amazon price: $31.96
Textbook Binding - 396 pages 2nd edition (July 2, 1999)
Addison-Wesley Pub Co; ISBN: 0201596253 ; Dimensions (in inches): 0.54 x 9.53 x 7.28
Amazon.com Sales Rank: 5,735
 

2 out of 5 stars don't waste your time - most features can't be implemented, April 14, 2000
Reviewer: A reader from Boston, MA

This would be a great book if it discussed more than the W3C specifications, most of which are not implemented properly by today's browsers. If you are serious about learning CSS, you need to understand browser implementations, and practical uses of the CSS spec. For example, the discussion on CSS-Positioning leads one to believe that this will replace HTML table alignment. It gives no indication to the usefullness of CSS-P to DHTML and such effects like drop-down menus.

If you want to learn CSS, there are many online resources. Also, a great product called TopStyle has built in code validation that clearly reveals browser implementation issues...it can't be beat.

 

Cascading Style Sheets The Definitive Guide
by Eric A. Meyer
Paperback - 480 pages (May 2000)
O'Reilly & Associates; ISBN: 1565926226
Amazon.com Sales Rank: 489

DHTML For the World Wide Web (Visual Quickstart Guide)

Amazon Price: $14.36 You Save: $3.59 (20%)

Paperback - 248 pages (October 1998)
Addison-Wesley Pub Co; ISBN: 0201353415 ; Dimensions (in inches): 0.55 x 9.01 x 7.00 Amazon.com Sales Rank: 1,527
Popular in: Hayward, CA (#14)
Avg. Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars
Number of Reviews: 21

This is actually CSS book

**+ Cascading Style Sheets Complete (McGraw-Hill Complete Series);

David D. Busch, J. W. Olsen
McGraw Hill made it again -- Compete junk book

2 out of 5 stars Tough Luck April 2, 2000
Reviewer: dan e. greenlaw from Washington State

I was not impressed with the book. Here's why: 1). having a strong HTML background and some CSS background, I did not learn a substantial amount worth anything to me and 2). I did not feel that it dealt with the problem of browser inconsistencies adequately. I learned more by printing off the 338 pages of CSS2 specs from the World Wide Web Consortium. 

 


Reference

Dynamic Html : The Definitive Reference ~ Usually ships in 24 hours
Danny Goodman / Paperback / Published 1998
Amazon price: $31.96 ~ You Save: $7.99 (20%)
 
Dynamic Html Reference And Software Development Kit
by Microsoft Corporation
Amazon price: $39.99

Paperback - 700 pages Bk&Cd Rom edition (March 17, 1999)
Microsoft Press; ISBN: 0735606382 ; Dimensions (in inches): 2.06 x 8.88 x 7.42
Amazon.com Sales Rank: 34,461
Avg. Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars Number of Reviews: 4

***+ Html 4.0 Sourcebook ~ Usually ships in 24 hours
Ian S. Graham / Paperback / Published 1998
Amazon price: $27.99 ~ You Save: $7.00 (20%)
Amazon.com Ian Graham Interview
Paperback - 712 pages 4th edition (April 1998)
John Wiley & Sons; ISBN: 0471257249 ; Dimensions (in inches): 1.49 x 9.21 x 7.46
Amazon.com Sales Rank: 10,467
Avg. Customer Review: 4 out of 5 stars
Number of Reviews: 11
 Not bad, but previous editions were somewhat poorly organized and very weak on forms.
5 out of 5 stars You get what you pay for March 8, 2000

Reviewer: Ariel Wolfer (see more about me) from Washington, DC

This book delivers on its promise of a thorough review of HTML 4.0. Every tag and attribute is explained well enough for you to get the hang of it on your own. This is not the "end-all" book on HTML, but simply a quick (but thorough) reference and a starting guide. It explains HTML topics in a natural language that can appeal to all classes of readers.

I was greatly pleased with one feature that this book possessed where others did not. Every tag and attribute in the book is labeled so that you know exactly what is currently supported by which browser. That is immensely important in web design. Graham also consistently included pictures of how various web pages were interepreted by differing browsers, along with the code itself.

This book is good for a beginner as well as a quick reference for developers. If you want a large quantity of specific information on specific topics within or related to HTML (E.g. CSS, XML, cgi, etc), then buy a different book. However, for all of the features proprietary to HTML 4.0, this is the book to get.

5 out of 5 stars Better than O'Reilly and Associates--This is THE GUIDE. December 14, 1998

Reviewer: John Rodenbiker (jrodenbiker@hotmail.com) (see more about me) from North Dakota State College of Science, North Dakota, USA

I have read both this book and O'Reilly's _The Definitive Guide_. Both are excellent books. However, Graham (or his editor) has laid his book out in a more logical format and goes beyond simple HTML.

If you are a beginner, Graham will gently guide into the complexities of advanced web page and web site design.

If you are an experienced web document creator, you should find new and enlightening info in this book. The detailed descriptions of each individual tag can be compared to no other book.

Graham begins with an introduction to HTML and basic document design. He also includes very pertinent graphics information. In later chapters he returns to and expands on the basic tags. He thouroughly examines every tag, helpfully separating them into standard tags and advanced/proprietary features.

He goes far beyond any other HTML guide I have read by including information on page collection and site design, info that *should* be standard coverage when talking about the web. He also includes information on URLs, HTTP, and CGI.

What sets this book apart from any other computer book I have ever read is the unbelievable amount of reliable and pertinent external sources, books and web sites alike. That, and the excellent index, make this what should be a standard book the shelf of anyone who has anything to do with the web.


Random Findings

 
****+ How to Use Html3 (How It Works Series) ~ Usually ships in 24 hours
Scott Arpajian / Paperback / Published 1996
Amazon price: $19.99 ~ You Save: $5.00 (20%)

Publisher: Ziff-Davis Press
ISBN: 1562764969
Published: 05-Nov-1996

Paperback - 240 pages (March 1996)
Ziff Davis Pr; ISBN: 1562763903 ; Dimensions (in inches): 0.60 x 9.97 x 8.50
Amazon.com Sales Rank: 70,241
Avg. Customer Review: *****
Number of Reviews: 3

A reader from Italy , October 14, 1998 *****
Beginner's best choice
Resently I got an assignment to build a web page but I had absolutely no experience. Fortunately, I had picked this book up intending some day to read it. Using HTML3 as my only source of reference, I was able to build a multi-paged web site with over 400 links world-wide. If it hadn't been for this book, I'd still be scratching my head and wondering how to start.

A reader , February 23, 1997 *****
Excellent beginner's book
This was the fourth book on HTML I've purchased and the only one that was clear and made sense. The explanations are great and pictures helpful. I followed it and created my web page in a short time.

A reader , January 10, 1997 *****
Clear, concise, and easy for a "newbie" to HTML.
As a beginner, learning HTML was a daunting prospect. Scott Arpajian's book, HTML3 was a real FIND for me. Since reading this book (more than once) I have constructed a personal homepage, and successfully completed several college computer courses requiring HTML work. THANKS.

***+ Graphics & Web Page Design (Laura Lemay's Web Workshop Series)
Laura Lemay, et al / Paperback / Published 1996
Amazon price: $55.00 (Special Order)
read now.

Paperback - 363 pages Bk&Cd-Rom edition (September 1996)
Sams; ISBN: 1575211254 ; Dimensions (in inches): 0.91 x 9.14 x 7.41

Amazon.com Sales Rank: 68,215
Avg. Customer Review: **+
Number of Reviews: 6
***+ Web Publishing Unleashed : Professional Reference ~ Usually ships in 24 hours
William Robert Stanek / Hardcover / Published 19-Dec-1996/ ISBN: 157521198X
Amazon price: $48.99 ~ You Save: $21.00 (30%)
read now.
Hardcover Bk&Cd-Rom edition (January 1997)
Sams; ISBN: 157521198X ; Dimensions (in inches): 2.46 x 9.38 x 7.91
Amazon.com Sales Rank: 22,580
Avg. Customer Review: ****+
Number of Reviews: 89
The World Wide Web Unleashed; With CDROM ~ Usually ships in 24 hours
John December, Neil Randall / Paperback / Published 1996
Amazon price: $39.99 ~ You Save: $10.00 (20%)
read now.
 
See http://www.december.com/works/wwwu.html for more information and support about this book's contents.
 
** Laura Lemay's Guide to Sizzling Web Site Design
Molly E. Holzschlag, Laura Lemay / Paperback / Published 1997
Amazon price: $36.00
Molly Holzschlag
Publisher:
ISBN: 1575212218
Published: 14-Feb-1997
Categories: Web Design, How To,

Disappoining

Web Scripting Secret Weapons
Scott Walter / Paperback / Published 1996
Amazon price: $39.99 (Special Order)
read now.
Scott Walter
Publisher: Que
ISBN: 0789709473
Published: 22-Nov-1996
Categories: Web Design, Web Development, Web Scripting,


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