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Ten years ago each bookstore has at least one shelf full of Java books. Not there no longer such shelf's and Java became just a new Cobol. Boring business language that Universities are torturing students God know for the sake of what ;-)

Java is a weal, overhyped language, that is useful as a VB and Cobol replacement. But that's aabout it. As a system programming language it sucks. What is good that by design (VM is used) it is fairy portable between Linux and Windows environment. It is slow, but we do not always need speed, do we ?  I believe speed usually does not matter much, if we are working with databases -- the main Java application area. JDK 1.2 is now available for Linux, so you can debug something is (supposedly) better GUI-based Windows environment and run on Linux without much troubles. Please note that Java 1.2 was recently renamed into Java 2 and is the first decent version of the language. Previous versions (1.0 and 1.1) were more like a proof of concept, than production environments.

There was a real glut of Java books up to probably 2002 or so. Only in 1999  almost a hundred was already published. The biggest problem with books on Java is that many of them were rushed out the door. It usually make sense to look for the second edition of the book -- it's at least some hope that second time the author corrected most of the errors in the first edition. Also with Java 1.2,  titles published, say, before 1999 that cover v. 1.1 or v. 1.0 should be discounted 50% or more. In any case it's not recommended to buy a book not published before second half of 1998, if you get just 20% discount. Things are changing too fast...

The second consideration is that the book should have e-text and a web-site. It the Java book does not have a website or full text available online, skip it -- if the author does not care much about the book, why should you? In any case web site is a must and corrections and examples should be available from the net.  Also beware of books written by several authors in which one or more author participated in several Java books published the same year -- there is good chance that the book was written by "slaves" with "generals" on the cover. Slave labor usually is not of high quality. See also Lysenkoism.

The third consideration is your own level. If you are a beginning Java programmer, than one introductory book (Teach Yourself Java 1.1 Programming in 24 Hours), one intermediate (Thinking in Java) and one reference book (Java in a Nutshell or Swing) would be useful. If you are developing Java servlets or other specialized area than you need a couple of additional books including at least one for the particular application area (for example, servets or network programming).

See also on-line Java books, JavaBeans books
 


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[Nov 08, 2015] The Anti-Java Professor and the Jobless Programmers

Nick Geoghegan

James Maguire's article raises some interesting questions as to why teaching Java to first year CS / IT students is a bad idea. The article mentions both Ada and Pascal – neither of which really "took off" outside of the States, with the former being used mainly by contractors of the US Dept. of Defense.

This is my own, personal, extension to the article – which I agree with – and why first year students should be taught C in first year. I'm biased though, I learned C as my first language and extensively use C or C++ in projects.

Java is a very high level language that has interesting features that make it easier for programmers. The two main points, that I like about Java, are libraries (although libraries exist for C / C++ ) and memory management.

Libraries

Libraries are fantastic. They offer an API and abstract a metric fuck tonne of work that a programmer doesn't care about. I don't care how the library works inside, just that I have a way of putting in input and getting expected output (see my post on abstraction). I've extensively used libraries, even this week, for audio codec decoding. Libraries mean not reinventing the wheel and reusing code (something students are discouraged from doing, as it's plagiarism, yet in the real world you are rewarded). Again, starting with C means that you appreciate the libraries more.

Memory Management

Managing your programs memory manually is a pain in the hole. We all know this after spending countless hours finding memory leaks in our programs. Java's inbuilt memory management tool is great – it saves me from having to do it. However, if I had have learned Java first, I would assume (for a short amount of time) that all languages managed memory for you or that all languages were shite compared to Java because they don't manage memory for you. Going from a "lesser" language like C to Java makes you appreciate the memory manager

What's so great about C?

In the context of a first language to teach students, C is perfect. C is

Java is a complex language that will spoil a first year student. However, as noted, CS / IT courses need to keep student retention rates high. As an example, my first year class was about 60 people, final year was 8. There are ways to keep students, possibly with other, easier, languages in the second semester of first year – so that students don't hate the subject when choosing the next years subject post exams.

Conversely, I could say that you should teach Java in first year and expand on more difficult languages like C or assembler (which should be taught side by side, in my mind) later down the line – keeping retention high in the initial years, and drilling down with each successive semester to more systems level programming.

There's a time and place for Java, which I believe is third year or final year. This will keep Java fresh in the students mind while they are going job hunting after leaving the bosom of academia. This will give them a good head start, as most companies are Java houses in Ireland.

[Nov 08, 2015] Abstraction

nickgeoghegan.net

Filed in Programming No Comments

A few things can confuse programming students, or new people to programming. One of these is abstraction.

Wikipedia says:

In computer science, abstraction is the process by which data and programs are defined with a representation similar to its meaning (semantics), while hiding away the implementation details. Abstraction tries to reduce and factor out details so that the programmer can focus on a few concepts at a time. A system can have several abstraction layers whereby different meanings and amounts of detail are exposed to the programmer. For example, low-level abstraction layers expose details of the hardware where the program is run, while high-level layers deal with the business logic of the program.

That might be a bit too wordy for some people, and not at all clear. Here's my analogy of abstraction.

Abstraction is like a car

A car has a few features that makes it unique.

If someone can drive a Manual transmission car, they can drive any Manual transmission car. Automatic drivers, sadly, cannot drive a Manual transmission drivers without "relearing" the car. That is an aside, we'll assume that all cars are Manual transmission cars – as is the case in Ireland for most cars.

Since I can drive my car, which is a Mitsubishi Pajero, that means that I can drive your car – a Honda Civic, Toyota Yaris, Volkswagen Passat.

All I need to know, in order to drive a car – any car – is how to use the breaks, accelerator, steering wheel, clutch and transmission. Since I already know this in my car, I can abstract away your car and it's controls.

I do not need to know the inner workings of your car in order to drive it, just the controls. I don't need to know how exactly the breaks work in your car, only that they work. I don't need to know, that your car has a turbo charger, only that when I push the accelerator, the car moves. I also don't need to know the exact revs that I should gear up or gear down (although that would be better on the engine!)

Virtually all controls are the same. Standardization means that the clutch, break and accelerator are all in the same place, regardless of the car. This means that I do not need to relearn how a car works. To me, a car is just a car, and is interchangeable with any other car.

Abstraction means not caring

As a programmer, or someone using a third party API (for example), abstraction means not caring how the inner workings of some function works – Linked list data structure, variable names inside the function, the sorting algorithm used, etc – just that I have a standard (preferable unchanging) interface to do whatever I need to do.

Abstraction can be taught of as a black box. For input, you get output. That shouldn't be the case, but often is. We need abstraction so that, as a programmer, we can concentrate on other aspects of the program – this is the corner-stone for large scale, multi developer, software projects.

Groovy in Action by Dierk Koenig, Andrew Glover, Paul King, Guillaume Laforge, Jon Skeet

one of the best programming books around, March 13, 2007
Reviewer: Dr. Gernot Starke "www.arc42.de" (Köln) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)
Your passion is programming? You're fluent in Java? Then you'll love GINA - akronym for "Groovy in Action". And you'll put the Ruby-Pickaxe aside....

Dierk and his co-authors did a truly marvelous job: clear structure, highly (and I really mean HIGHLY) motivating language plus the best language-intro I read for a very long time... (and I've read quite a few during the last 20 years, believe me...)

GINA is made up from three parts: language intro, library intro and practical tips, each part approx. 5 chapters.

Lets start with the language intro: After reading a few pages I could not stop - a real page-turner. Brilliant examples - they use java's assert-statement to make the intention of every example crystal-clear, a pattern which I have never encountered before - congratulations to this idea and its perfect realization throughout the book!

In the library part you'll find intro to groovy builders, database and XML development and the integration of Groovy in "conventional" java programs. IMHO the authors again did a great job in choosing proper samples and making them transparent to us readers.

Finally, more than 100 pages on everyday solutions - a nice selection.

My personal summary: Go, get it! I liked it better than Pick-Axe (which I really adore!). The only other in quality is "Practical Common Lisp" by Peter Seibel (too sad that nobody uses Lisp these days...) - all other
programming books I know really fall behind.

***** Learning Java (The Java Series) by Patrick Niemeyer, Jonathan Knudsen

Paperback - 720 pages Bk&Cd-Rom edition (May 2000)
O'Reilly & Associates; ISBN: 1565927184 ; Dimensions (in inches): 1.35 x 9.17 x 7.00

Amazon.com Sales Rank: 16,526

Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars Based on 23 reviews.

Softpanorama review: Patrick Niemeyer is the author of Beanshell. That means that he really knows a lot about Java and JVM that is simply belong the level of an ordinary Java book author.

4 of 5 stars One of the best Java books, and agreeable read as well, November 20, 2001
Reviewer: Nicholas Cole from Paris, France

I really don't understand the mediocre reviews this book has received. Niemeyer writes well, - he's more or less unique in this respect, - and he's very talented at explaining complex ideas simply; when you've read his book, you've really understood the fundamental ideas underpinning Java, many of which are only treated in advanced specialised texts. Difficult subjects, like method overriding, security and threads, become clear. When you've read the book, you'll have a real understanding of Java.
I have 2 criticisms; his explanations are liberally illustrated with programmed examples, but, - and this is the real disappointment, - there are no exercises for the reader; its not a book that gives you hands-on experience.

The second criticism is that he doesn't go far enough; the important subject of EJBs is not touched on.


The ideal would be this book, with a certain number of extra subjects, such as EJBs, accompanied by a workbook with worked examples and exercises.


Even without, its one of the best Java books around.

Books with Full E-texts

The main problem with books on java, is that generally they contain too much evangelism. A lot of authors seems to be more OO and Java adepts, than necessary. also from the point of view of teaching Java at the university it is difficult to argue that Pascal is much simpler language than Java.  So what's the progress ? From that point of view Java is really horrible introductory language -- too complex and without decent debugging compilers.  The best -- Symantec Café -- is a joke from the point of view of an introductory course.  Even PL/1 would be better -- it does have decent compilers ;-) Some books start with applets. I think that this is bad idea. Java applets tend to be regarded as more fun (or "cool") by new students, if and only if they can debug their own. With current Java compilers quality this is usually not the case.

I prefer books that do not introduce applets/graphic programming in first chapters. For example Thinking in Java. IMHO, such an approach is the only reasonable approach to teach Java as introductory language, if one exists at all. See also controversial article  In search of the best Java book for beginners - JavaWorld - February 1999

*** Thinking in Java  by Bruce Eckel full e-text available
/ Paperback / 1100 pages/ Published March, 1998/  ISBN: 0136597238
The target audience is experienced programmers who are new to Java. Slightly outdated and (as I understood only now) somewhat poorly organized for the introductory course. Mixture of coverage of Java 1.1. and 1.0. Sometimes instead of "thinking in Java" the author digs into unnecessary and useless details of obsolete Java implementations. My favorite introductory book on Java, although Core Java 1.2 is a strong competitor. Electronic version of the books is available from the www.bruceeckel.com.

 James Gosling Bill Joy Guy Steele - The Java Language Specification

Books From Macmillan's Electronic BookShelf

( www.mcp.com is gone but books continue to exist of various web sites; Google is your friend)

***+ JAVA 1.2 Unleashed ~ Usually ships in 24 hours. Full e-text available from www.mcp.com
Jamie Jaworski, Jamie Jaworksi / Hardcover / Published 1998
Amazon Price: $ 34.99 (30% off)
Decent second book on Java (see next book as a decent introductory book).. More up to date than Thinking in Java. Recommended.
***+ Teach Yourself Java 1.1 Programming in 24 Hours ~ Usually ships in 24 hours
Rogers Cadenhead / Paperback / Published by Sams 21-Mar-1997/ISBN: 1575212706
Amazon Price: $19.99(20% off)
The book has a Web site: http://www.prefect.com/java24. Pretty decent. Highly recommended. Seems to really about Java 1.1. and can be used as an introductory book. Perfect companion book to the Java 1.2 Unleashed. read an interview  with the author.
 
**+ Special Edition Using Java 1.1 (Special Edition Using...) ~ Usually ships in 24 hours
Joe Weber, et al / Paperback / Published by Que 06-May-1997/ISBN: 0789710943
Amazon Price: $39.99(20% off)

This book Java 1.0 book and is more a textbook that a reference. It covers programming techniques that other books frequently skim over. I was impressed with the wide range of topics such as database, network, graphics, CORBA, and JavaScript. I only wish that it presented these topics with Java 1.1 features and techniques.

Java 1.1 introduces several major features to Sun's Java products, such as Java Beans, JAR files, and more. This book provides good coverage of these new tools and techniques.

Java 1.1 also brings on several changes in the language itself. There are new methods that improve on, and replace, older methods. Sun's Java compiler generates warnings when a method has been deprecated. The examples in this book have NOT been updated, so you will need another book to teach you to develop proper Java 1.1 source code.

**+ Hacking Java : The Java Professional's Resource Kit ~ Usually ships in 24 hours
Mark Wutka, et al / Paperback / Published by Que 15-Nov-1996/ISBN: 078970935X
Amazon Price: $47.99 (20% off)

This outdated Java 1.0 based book is nevertheless a good book.  Has CORBA ORB demonstration to deliver client/server applications in java. the CD-ROM contains the complete text of another good java book Special Edition Using Java, plus 4 other books AND a "publisher’s edition" of Microsoft Visual J++ Java development environment. This book was a great value when it was first published... Now you can probably find it for $10 in discount stores.

*+    Creating Web Applets With Java ~ Usually ships in 24 hours

David Gulbransen, et al / Paperback / Published by New Riders 29-Apr-1996
Amazon Price: $31.99(20% off)

Oudated Java 1.0 based book. Who cares now about applets ;-). Moreover this is kind of "For Dummies" book. But browsing the book online can probably be useful.

Developing Intranet Applications With Java ~ Usually ships in 24 hours

Jerry Ablan, Eric Reiner / Paperback / Published by New Riders11-Oct-1996/ISBN: 1575211661
Amazon Price: $36.00(20% off)

Outdated Java 1.0 based book. Probably it would be interesting to browse the book online -- it covers  interactive databases, multimedia, animations, and sound for use on the intranet.

Java Developer's Reference ~ Usually ships in 2-3 days
Mike Cohn(Editor), et al / Paperback / Published 07-Nov-1996/ISBN: 1575211297
Amazon Price: $47.99(20% off)

Good reference, if you are using JDK 1.0.2. It explains the components of the Java Development Kit (JDK) and the Java programming language.

** Teach Yourself Java in 21 Days
Laura Lemay, Charles L. Perkins / Paperback / Published by Sams 08-Nov-1996

The first edition of a bestseller. Old but not first several chapters are that bad and still usable.  Actually the third edition of the book that covers Java 1.2 is actually pretty decent, but right now it is not available from MCP electronic bookshelf.

The Official Gamelan Java Directory
TAPLEY, SPIVAK, HIDARY, CHAFEE
Publisher: Ziff-Davis Press
ISBN: 1562764497
Published: 20-Sep-1996

** Tricks of the Java Programming Gurus ~ Usually ships in 24 hours
Glenn L. Vanderburg / Paperback / Published 29-Jul-1996
Amazon Price: $31.99(20% off)

Not that bad, but outdated. For Java 1.1 coverage, look at "Maximum Java 1.1" instead.  "Tricks of the Java Programming Gurus" covers Java 1.0. "Maximum Java 1.1" is the title of the new, revised edition covering Java 1.1. Every chapter has been updated, and there are several new chapters.

Paper-only Introductory books on Java

For introductory books with e-text available see above. Currently I see the only one introductory book without e-text that to certain extent worth its price.

*****  Learning Java (The Java Series)
by Patrick Niemeyer, Jonathan Knudsen
Our Price: $27.96
 

Paperback - 720 pages Bk&Cd-Rom edition (May 2000)
O'Reilly & Associates; ISBN: 1565927184 ; Dimensions (in inches): 1.35 x 9.17 x 7.00

Amazon.com Sales Rank: 16,526

Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars Based on 23 reviews.

Softpanorama review: Patrick Niemeyer is the author of Beanshell. That means that he really knows a lot about Java and JVM that is simply belong the level of an ordinary Java book author.

4 of 5 stars One of the best Java books, and agreeable read as well, November 20, 2001
Reviewer: Nicholas Cole from Paris, France

I really don't understand the mediocre reviews this book has received. Niemeyer writes well, - he's more or less unique in this respect, - and he's very talented at explaining complex ideas simply; when you've read his book, you've really understood the fundamental ideas underpinning Java, many of which are only treated in advanced specialised texts. Difficult subjects, like method overriding, security and threads, become clear. When you've read the book, you'll have a real understanding of Java.
I have 2 criticisms; his explanations are liberally illustrated with programmed examples, but, - and this is the real disappointment, - there are no exercises for the reader; its not a book that gives you hands-on experience. The second criticism is that he doesn't go far enough; the important subject of EJBs is not touched on.
The ideal would be this book, with a certain number of extra subjects, such as EJBs, accompanied by a workbook with worked examples and exercises.
Even without, its one of the best Java books around.

 
***+ Core Java 1.2: Not bad, but no e-text and even programs are difficult to download.
        Core Java 1.2 Volume 1 Fundamentals
Cay S. Horstmann, Gary Cornell  / Paperback, 700p / Published by Prentice Hall in December 1998 (third edition)
This is the second edition of the classical book on Java. Like in TIJ the target audience is experienced programmers who are new to Java. I consider it to be the main competition to "Thinking in Java"(TIJ). It is also oriented on serious programmers, but without e-text it is not that attractive. But it is newer that TIJ and better organized. The book does has a WEB site (sorry no e-text) Core Java Web Page  Here are several reviews:
ERCB DDJ Programmer's Bookshelf October 1997
Comparative Review of Java Books
Core Java not just for experts - JavaWorld - September 1996
BTW second edition of Core Java that covers 1.2 is not that highly rated by amazon.com buyers as the first edition :-). The popularity of Symantec Cafe might be as a result of its free distribution with the first edition of the Core Java book (now Symantec does not provide even limited, student-oriented version -- if you are a developer, please dump Cafe and use Visual Age instead, if possible).
***+ Vol. 2. Advanced Features -- no e-text available. CD contains Symantec Cafe. Web site is available

Reference books on Java

***+ Java in a Nutshell : A Desktop Quick Reference (The Java Series)  -- e-text is available in the expensive deluxe edition only (on CD that contain several other reference books)
      
David Flanagan / Paperback / 2-d edition /Published May 1997/ ISBN: 156592262X. It is a very good reference book, but most information can be found on the web.  At the same time the cost  is only $16 (with 20% discount) so it's quite affordable. Each class or interface listing is followed by a listing of the classes, if any, that extend or implement it, the methods that return an object of that type, the methods that are passed an object of that type, and the fields that are declared to be of that type. In this online version, this information is included directly with the class quickref material, where it will hopefully be more useful. The quick reference material also contains three useful indexes: a class index, a method index and a field index. You can browse the quick reference pages from O'Reilly site, or you can download zip file for viewing locally on your own computer.
***+ Java Network Programming  Attention: no e-text
Elliotte Rusty Harold, / Paperback / Published 1997
Can be used as a reference book on Java network API. Slightly outdated -- Java 1.1 based. Good explanation of the java.net.* and java.rmi classes with useful  examples. No Corba and/or COM information at all. But there is no other book that covers java.net classes in such depth. Drawback -- no electronic version of the text available. O'Reilly site   contains the first chapter and examples from the book.  His Cafe Au Lait web site at http://sunsite.unc.edu/javafaq/ is a useful Java site.
 
Java Fundamental Classes Reference (Java Series)
Mark Grand, Jonathan Knudsen / Paperback / Published 1997

Core Java Foundation Classes (Core Series)

Kim Topley, et al / Paperback / Published 1998
 
Java Foundation Classes
Matthew Nelson / Paperback / Published 1998
 
Jfc, Java Foundation Classes
Daniel I. Joshi, Pavel A. Vorobiev / Paperback / Published 1998

Network programming

??? Real-World Java 1.2 Networking (Java Masters Series) ~ Usually ships in 24 hours
Justin Couch / Paperback / Published 1999
Our Price: $35.99 ~ You Save: $9.00 (20%)
??? Advanced Java Network Programming (Masters Series)
Justin Couch / Paperback / Published 1999
Our Price: $44.95 (Not Yet Published)
***+ Java Network Programming  Attention: no e-text
Elliotte Rusty Harold, / Paperback / Published 1997
I like the author style. Can be used as a reference book on Java network API. Slightly outdated -- Java 1.1 based. Good explanation of the java.net.* and java.rmi classes with useful  examples. No Corba and/or COM information at all. But there is no other book that covers java.net classes in such depth. Drawback -- no electronic version of the text available. O'Reilly site   contains the first chapter and examples from the book.  His Cafe Au Lait web site at http://sunsite.unc.edu/javafaq/ is a useful Java site.

***+ Java Network Programming, 2nd edition.  Attention: no e-text. CD contains just examples
by Merlin Hughes, Michael Shoffner, and Derek Hamner
with a chapter on CORBA by Umesh Bellur January 1999, Softbound, 860 pages ISBN 188477749X

Here you can buy electronic version of  Java Network Programming

The first edition of Java Network Programming was acclaimed by amazon.com readers as a good networking reference. It provided complete details of the I/O with extensive API coverage and CD with examples.


Specialized books

Servlets

**+ Core Java Web Server (Core Series) ~ Usually ships in 24 hours
Christopher Taylor, Timothy Kimmett / Paperback / Published 1998
Amazon Price: $39.99(20% off)
*** Java Servlet Programming ~ Usually ships in 2-3 days
Jason Hunter, et al / Paperback / Published 1998
Amazon Price: $26.36(20% off)
        A good book. Probably better deal than the prev one.
 
*+ Java Database Programming : Servlets & Jdbc ~ Usually ships in 24 hours
Alan Williamson, Ceri Moran / Paperback / Published 1998
$49.95 (0% off)
*+ Java Servlets (Java Masters) ~ Usually ships in 24 hours
Karl Moss / Paperback / Published 1998
$35.96(20% off)
 

Algorithms

 
** Data Structures & Algorithm Analysis in Java ~ Usually ships in 24 hours
Mark Allen Weiss / Hardcover / Published 1999
Our Price: $62.25

Swing

Graphic Java 1.2, Mastering the Jfc : Swing (Java Series , Vol 2)
David Geary / Paperback / Published 1999
Our Price: $39.96 (20% off)
 
Java for the World Wide Web : Visual Quickstart Guide ~ Usually ships in 24 hours
Dori Smith / Paperback / Published 1998
Our Price: $14.39 (20% off)
 
Java Swing ~ Usually ships in 24 hours
Robert Eckstein, et al / Paperback / Published 1998
Our Price: $35.96 (20% off))
Up to Speed With Swing: User Interfaces With Java Foundation Classes ~ Usually ships in 24 hours
Steven J. Gutz / Paperback / Published 1998
Our Price: $42.95
Swing Reference : User Interfaces With Java Foundation Classes
Stephen Drye / Paperback / Published 1998
Upt to Speed With Swing : User Interfaces With Java Foundation Classes
Steven Gutz / Paperback / Published 1998

JDBC

Java Database Programming : Servlets & Jdbc
Alan Williamson, Ceri Moran / Paperback / Published 1998
Java Database Programming With Jdbc (Visual Developer)
Pratik Patel, et al / Hardcover / Published 1997
Jdbc : Java Database Connectivity
Bernard Van Haecke / Paperback / Published 1997
JDBC Database Access With Java: A Tutorial and Annotated Reference (Java Series)
Maydene Fisher, et al / Paperback / Published 1997
Jdbc Developer's Resource : Database Programming on the Internet (Prentice Hall Ptr Developer's Resource Series)
Art Taylor / Paperback / Published 1997
Teach Yourself Database Programming With Jdbc in 21 Days (Teach Yourself Series)
Ashton Hobbs / Paperback / Published 1997
Core Jdbc Programming
Janet L. Traub, David J. McElroy / Paperback / Published 1997

Java VM

Inside the Java Virtual Machine (Java Masters Series) ~ Ships in 2-3 days
Bill Venners / Paperback / Published 1997 Our Price: $35.96 ~ You Save: $8.99 (20%) Read more about this title...
Java Virtual Machine (Java Series) ~ Usually ships in 24 hours
Jon Meyer, et al / Paperback / Published 1997 Our Price: $26.36 ~ You Save: $6.59 (20%) Read more about this title...
The Java Virtual Machine Specification (The Java Series)
Tim Lindholm, Frank Yellin / Paperback / Published 1998
Our Price: $42.95 (Not Yet Published -- On Order)
Programming for the Java Virtual Machine
Engel. Joshua, Joshua Engel / Paperback / Published 1998
Our Price: $39.95 1(Not Yet Published -- On Order)

Security

* Java Security
Scott Oaks, Scott Oakes / Paperback / Published 1998

Etc

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Classic books:

The Peter Principle : Parkinson Law : 1984 : The Mythical Man-MonthHow to Solve It by George Polya : The Art of Computer Programming : The Elements of Programming Style : The Unix Hater’s Handbook : The Jargon file : The True Believer : Programming Pearls : The Good Soldier Svejk : The Power Elite

Most popular humor pages:

Manifest of the Softpanorama IT Slacker Society : Ten Commandments of the IT Slackers Society : Computer Humor Collection : BSD Logo Story : The Cuckoo's Egg : IT Slang : C++ Humor : ARE YOU A BBS ADDICT? : The Perl Purity Test : Object oriented programmers of all nations : Financial Humor : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2008 : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2010 : The Most Comprehensive Collection of Editor-related Humor : Programming Language Humor : Goldman Sachs related humor : Greenspan humor : C Humor : Scripting Humor : Real Programmers Humor : Web Humor : GPL-related Humor : OFM Humor : Politically Incorrect Humor : IDS Humor : "Linux Sucks" Humor : Russian Musical Humor : Best Russian Programmer Humor : Microsoft plans to buy Catholic Church : Richard Stallman Related Humor : Admin Humor : Perl-related Humor : Linus Torvalds Related humor : PseudoScience Related Humor : Networking Humor : Shell Humor : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2011 : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2012 : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2013 : Java Humor : Software Engineering Humor : Sun Solaris Related Humor : Education Humor : IBM Humor : Assembler-related Humor : VIM Humor : Computer Viruses Humor : Bright tomorrow is rescheduled to a day after tomorrow : Classic Computer Humor

The Last but not Least


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Last modified: February 21, 2017