Softpanorama
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Contents Bulletin Scripting in shell and Perl Network troubleshooting History Humor

Workplace Discrimination and Harassment

News Books Toxic Managers Recommended Links The psychopath in the corner office Anger trap The Fiefdom Syndrome
Isolation as a psychopath attack strategy Demeaning Projection Workplace mobbing Gaslighting Intimidation Devious Political Tactics
Cutoffs and Deniable disclosure Surviving a Bad Performance Review Insubordination Threat Ignoring personal boundaries Doting  Smothering Emotional blackmail
Office Stockholm Syndrom Understanding Micromanagers and control freaks Rules of Communication       Humor Etc

Ethical Awareness and Decision Making
Resolving Conflicts of Interest (Reasoning)
Workplace Discrimination and Harassment (Overview)

When you walk in the door to work every day, you see the familiar faces of people who share the same goal--to get along well and work together to make your company successful. At least, that's how it should be.

Discrimination and harassment can get in the way of achieving this goal.

Most ethical dilemmas, however, share some common characteristics. Often, they
 
  are complex
  have many facets that must be considered
  are open to different interpretations
  have important consequences
What is an ethical dilemma?
And they often
 
  present more than two options
  are emotionally difficult
  arise out of situations that change over time
  are not subject to laws, regulations, or rules
  involve a conflict between two positive values
  are subject to pressure from outside forces

Certain thoughts, like "it's no big deal" or "I deserve this,"  " This is a part of the job" (entitilement) occur to people facing ethical dilemmas. These thoughts should act as warning signs--you have a better chance of recognizing ethical dilemmas when you tune in to them.

The ethics quick test
The test consists of four questions:
 
  Will taking the action I'm considering violate any laws or company policies?
  Will taking the action I'm considering negatively impact others?
  Will others feel I owe them something--or they owe me something--in return if I take the action I'm considering?
  Could the action I'm considering appear improper?
The ethics quick test
Where can you turn for input? Here are some resources:
 
  Your company's core values and code of conduct
  Your supervisor, your supervisor's supervisor, or another manager
  Your company's law department
  Your company's HR department or ethics department, if it has one
  An individual you consider to be an ethical role model
The ethics quick test
The second question to ask is whether the action you're considering will harm others.

If the answer is yes, don't do it. If the answer is no, go on to the next question. If you're not sure what the answer is, ask someone you trust for input.
The ethics quick test
The third question to ask is whether others will feel you owe them something--or they owe you something--if you take the action you're considering.

If the answer is yes, don't do it. If the answer is no, go on to the next question. If you're not sure what the answer is, ask someone you trust for input.

Think about it from Chuck's perspective. Because Jerry offered him the tickets, he might feel that he owes something in return.