Softpanorama

May the source be with you, but remember the KISS principle ;-)
Contents Bulletin Scripting in shell and Perl Network troubleshooting History Humor

Spyware Scanners

News See also Recommended books Recommended Links Malicious Software Removal Tool Adaware Spybot S&D

For known or suspected malware files the best scanner is online VirusTotal - Free Online Virus, Malware and URL Scanner

About VirusTotal - VirusTotal

What is VirusTotal

VirusTotal, a subsidiary of Google, is a free online service that analyzes files and URLs enabling the identification of viruses, worms, trojans and other kinds of malicious content detected by antivirus engines and website scanners. At the same time, it may be used as a means to detect false positives, i.e. innocuous resources detected as malicious by one or more scanners.

VirusTotal’s mission is to help in improving the antivirus and security industry and make the internet a safer place through the development of free tools and services.

VirusTotal's main characteristics are highlighted below.

Free unbiased service

VirusTotal, is offered freely to end users as long as its use has no commercial purpose and does not become part of any business activity. Even though the service works with engines belonging to different enterprises and organizations, VirusTotal does not distribute or advertise any products belonging to third parties, but simply acts as an aggregator of information. This prevents us from being subjected to any kind of bias and allows us to offer an objective service to our users

Runs multiple antivirus engines and website scanners

VirusTotal simply acts as an information aggregator. The aggregated data is the output of different antivirus engines, website scanners, file and URL analysis tools and user contributions. The full list of antivirus solutions and website scanners used in VirusTotal can be found in the credits and collaboration acknowledgements section.

Runs multiple file and URL characterization tools

As previously stated, VirusTotal also aggregates the output of a number of file and URL characterization tools. These tools cover a wide range of purposes, ranging from providing structural information about Microsoft Windows portable executables (PEs) to identifying signed software. The full list of file and URL characterization tools used in VirusTotal can be found in the credits and collaboration acknowledgements section.

Real time updates of virus signatures and blacklists

The malware signatures of antivirus solutions present in VirusTotal are periodically updated as they are developed and distributed by the antivirus companies. The update polling frequency is 15 minutes—this makes sure that the products are using the latest signature sets.

Website scanning is done via API queries to the different companies providing the particular solution, hence, the most updated version of their dataset is always used.

Detailed results from each scanner

VirusTotal not only tells you whether a given antivirus solution detected a submitted file, but also displays the exact detection label returned by each engine (e.g. I-Worm.Allaple.gen).

This feature is also present in URL scanners. Most of them will discriminate malware sites, phishing sites, suspicious sites, etc. Moreover, some of the engines will provide additional information explicitly stating whether a given URL belongs to a particular botnet, which brand is targeted by a given phishing site, etc.

Real time global service operation statistics

Information about the number of resources (files and URLs) processed by VirusTotal can be found in the statistics section. These statistics provide a number of notions and groupings, such as global detection ratios for the received files, submissions per country, most popular detection labels, etc. No statistics comparing the different antivirus products and website detection engines are generated—neither will they ever be generated (on a public or private basis), even though their calculation is trivial. The reason is that using VirusTotal for antivirus testing is a bad idea.

Automation API

File and URL scanning can be automated with a free public API. For obvious reasons (including prevention of competition with the antivirus products present in VirusTotal), the public API is subjected to a strong request rate limitation. Should a user require a higher request rate, a honeypot API is available for researchers and a private mass API is offered to individuals with commercial and product enhancement intentions. A detailed specification of the different APIs can be found in the advanced features section.

Online malware research community

In August 2010 VirusTotal integrated a pseudo-social network that allows its users to interact with other users and comment on files and URLs. These comments may range from deep malware analyses to information on the distribution vector and in-the-wild locations of the submitted files, hence, the community acts as the collective intelligence component of VirusTotal. Files and URLs can be voted as malicious or innocuous, building a community maliciousness score for the resource.

In other words, when security products fail (false positives/false negatives), there is still a chance that some VirusTotal Community user will have produced a useful review of the resource for its community peers.

Desktop applications for interacting with the service

With the aim of making the Internet a safer place VirusTotal's team has released a number of desktop applications and tools for interacting with the service (one-click file uploader, browser extensions, etc.). Many of VirusTotal's users have also developed their own applications and have made them publicly available on the Internet. More information about these resources can be found in the advanced features section.

VirusTotal and confidentiality

Files and URLs sent to VirusTotal will be shared with antivirus vendors and security companies so as to help them in improving their services and products. We do this because we believe it will eventually lead to a safer Internet and better end-user protection.

By default any file/URL submitted to VirusTotal which is detected by at least one scanner is freely sent to all those scanners that do not detect the resource. Additionally, all files and URLs enter a private store that may be accessed by premium (mainly security/antimalware companies/organizations) VirusTotal users so as to improve their security products and services.

Microsoft provides free scanner called Microsoft Safety Scanner - Antivirus Remove Spyware, Malware, Viruses Free  that can be used for 10 days and is based on Microsoft Security Essentials.

There are two older free Spyware scanners (Adaware and  Spybot S&D) that essentially started this class of scanner but later were overrun by stronger commercial entities.  Spybot still has a fee edition and might make some sense to try.

The main problem with of the Spyware scanners is that Spyware is repeating the path of file viruses and newer variants are designed with the specific mechanism to avoid detection by the scanners (polymorthic spyware). One such example is  vx2 Spyware (SAHAgent, aka Golden Retriever, ShopAtHome and ShopAtHomeSelect). Another example is CoolWebSearch or ‘CWS’ as many refer to it.  With more the a hundred know variants CWS has surpassed a lot of other annoying hijackers such as Lop, Xupiter and Whazit etc  (see such sites as allhyperlinks.com, coolwwwsearch.com, youfindall.com, etc ).  You might need to use a specialized software like CWShredder to remove CWS.

Never buy or download a commercial Spyware scanner without checking reviews on independent sites. Other things equal Microsoft provides free spyware scanner that probably is better then most commercial offerings (the level of research Microsoft can afford cannot be compared with small entities like F-secure; they really have top guns on staff).

Many such products are very questionable, some ask you to buy an expensive version after scanning, some can be classified as Spyware.  A very simple litmus test is to check a quality of the website. It you feel that an information on it sucks, the chances that the product sucks too are extremely high.

Never buy or download a commercial Spyware scanner without checking reviews on independent sites. Unstable or too zealous scanner is a menace to the stability of your system very similar to spyware.  It might well be a spyware...

An attempt to hide Spyware under the disguise of Spyware scanner can be viewed as yet another example of deceptive advertising.  See for example Trustworthy Anti-Spyware Products.

Moreover often free tools are better that commercial.  As PCWorld.com - Poor Defenders  article stated "Some anti-spyware companies use confusing ads, and our tests show their $20-$60 products are less effective than free competitors."

Freeware spyware scanners (Microsoft Windows Defender, Adaware and SpyBot) are traditional first level of defense, but like with AV scanners they have drawbacks: they cannot fight the most complex spyware engines and signature file may not contains a signature of spyware bug that bite you. Still they should be tried first.

You need to download the latest signature file

Scanner can be used even if spyware shuts down your internet connection: you just need to burn a CD with those tools and the latest signature file, install those two tools from a CD and run them one by one.

Note 2: Adaware can generally be used without reading any instructions ;-) Spybot S&D probably not. See  Spyware Removal Guidelines about how to use Spybot S&D as this tool has some important additional capabilities that might escape you without reading the manual...

Here are relevant recommendation from the Slashdot discussion (Every 5th Call At Dell Is Spyware-Related) about spyware (see some additional interesting posts from this discussion below):

At least 8 of the 10 computers that I fix follow this routine:

Update and run AV program, if possible.
Install Adaware, update, run.
Install Spybot S&D, update, run.
Run CWShredder.
Fire up a HijackThis! log and manually remove the leftovers.

I'm getting pretty damn good at filtering out the hijackthis logs, too. Seriously, if you familiarize yourself with spyware removal, you could make a killing on the home PC market. Manufacturers won't help you with spyware. It's getting to the point where the retail chains and PC shops won't deal with it either; they'll simply offer you a format/reinstall.

Most importantly, when it finds spyware it tells you requires a reboot to remove, you'll notice that it rescans everything during the system restart. The thing is, though, it isn't *removing* everything during this stage. It's only setting itself up so it *can* remove what it finds successfully, if you click to "fix problems" on its console window after everything finishes and the Windows desktop comes back up!

As always our AV heroes are slow to react and that's why Symantec, McAfee, and the other popular AV scanners don't track spyware along with viruses and worms.

Note 1: Never ever buy untied commercial antispyware products before you try free and tested tools.   Be very skeptical about tools from well known antivirus vendors (they usually sell junk ;-). Please note that like with antivirus scanners you need the latest signature file.

Free version of   Spybot Search and Destroy scanner Spybot Search and Destroy and/or Adaware provide results comparable with the commercial tools (in case you are using the most latest signatures) and are recommended for checking. Please note that before the scan you do need to download the latest signature file separately  (older signature files miss the most recent mutations of engines like SAHAgent).

Recently written Spyware Removal Guidelines use Spybot S&D as example, as it provides some additional useful tools, but old good Adaware is also an extremely useful tool  and can find and disinfect some Spyware variants that are missed by  Spybot S&D (see, for example its VX2 cleaner plugin that I mentioned before) .  You probably are better off using both.


Top Visited
Switchboard
Latest
Past week
Past month

NEWS CONTENTS

Old News ;-)

[Dec 02, 2012] About VirusTotal - VirusTotal

What is VirusTotal

VirusTotal, a subsidiary of Google, is a free online service that analyzes files and URLs enabling the identification of viruses, worms, trojans and other kinds of malicious content detected by antivirus engines and website scanners. At the same time, it may be used as a means to detect false positives, i.e. innocuous resources detected as malicious by one or more scanners.

VirusTotal’s mission is to help in improving the antivirus and security industry and make the internet a safer place through the development of free tools and services.

VirusTotal's main characteristics are highlighted below.

Free unbiased service

VirusTotal, is offered freely to end users as long as its use has no commercial purpose and does not become part of any business activity. Even though the service works with engines belonging to different enterprises and organizations, VirusTotal does not distribute or advertise any products belonging to third parties, but simply acts as an aggregator of information. This prevents us from being subjected to any kind of bias and allows us to offer an objective service to our users

Runs multiple antivirus engines and website scanners

VirusTotal simply acts as an information aggregator. The aggregated data is the output of different antivirus engines, website scanners, file and URL analysis tools and user contributions. The full list of antivirus solutions and website scanners used in VirusTotal can be found in the credits and collaboration acknowledgements section.

Runs multiple file and URL characterization tools

As previously stated, VirusTotal also aggregates the output of a number of file and URL characterization tools. These tools cover a wide range of purposes, ranging from providing structural information about Microsoft Windows portable executables (PEs) to identifying signed software. The full list of file and URL characterization tools used in VirusTotal can be found in the credits and collaboration acknowledgements section.

Real time updates of virus signatures and blacklists

The malware signatures of antivirus solutions present in VirusTotal are periodically updated as they are developed and distributed by the antivirus companies. The update polling frequency is 15 minutes—this makes sure that the products are using the latest signature sets.

Website scanning is done via API queries to the different companies providing the particular solution, hence, the most updated version of their dataset is always used.

Detailed results from each scanner

VirusTotal not only tells you whether a given antivirus solution detected a submitted file, but also displays the exact detection label returned by each engine (e.g. I-Worm.Allaple.gen).

This feature is also present in URL scanners. Most of them will discriminate malware sites, phishing sites, suspicious sites, etc. Moreover, some of the engines will provide additional information explicitly stating whether a given URL belongs to a particular botnet, which brand is targeted by a given phishing site, etc.

Real time global service operation statistics

Information about the number of resources (files and URLs) processed by VirusTotal can be found in the statistics section. These statistics provide a number of notions and groupings, such as global detection ratios for the received files, submissions per country, most popular detection labels, etc. No statistics comparing the different antivirus products and website detection engines are generated—neither will they ever be generated (on a public or private basis), even though their calculation is trivial. The reason is that using VirusTotal for antivirus testing is a bad idea.

Automation API

File and URL scanning can be automated with a free public API. For obvious reasons (including prevention of competition with the antivirus products present in VirusTotal), the public API is subjected to a strong request rate limitation. Should a user require a higher request rate, a honeypot API is available for researchers and a private mass API is offered to individuals with commercial and product enhancement intentions. A detailed specification of the different APIs can be found in the advanced features section.

Online malware research community

In August 2010 VirusTotal integrated a pseudo-social network that allows its users to interact with other users and comment on files and URLs. These comments may range from deep malware analyses to information on the distribution vector and in-the-wild locations of the submitted files, hence, the community acts as the collective intelligence component of VirusTotal. Files and URLs can be voted as malicious or innocuous, building a community maliciousness score for the resource.

In other words, when security products fail (false positives/false negatives), there is still a chance that some VirusTotal Community user will have produced a useful review of the resource for its community peers.

Desktop applications for interacting with the service

With the aim of making the Internet a safer place VirusTotal's team has released a number of desktop applications and tools for interacting with the service (one-click file uploader, browser extensions, etc.). Many of VirusTotal's users have also developed their own applications and have made them publicly available on the Internet. More information about these resources can be found in the advanced features section.

VirusTotal and confidentiality

Files and URLs sent to VirusTotal will be shared with antivirus vendors and security companies so as to help them in improving their services and products. We do this because we believe it will eventually lead to a safer Internet and better end-user protection.

By default any file/URL submitted to VirusTotal which is detected by at least one scanner is freely sent to all those scanners that do not detect the resource. Additionally, all files and URLs enter a private store that may be accessed by premium (mainly security/antimalware companies/organizations) VirusTotal users so as to improve their security products and services.

[Aug 24, 2005] What a great app! (Feedback for the page Spyware Removal Using Spybot S&D; slightly edited for clarity):

Thanks for recommending this freeware - I recently cleaned my pc from a Trojan which disabled the wallpaper and gave a warning tool in the task bar telling me to buy some anti malware software. I knew this was a hack from the start and set about cleaning the registry , resetting dodgy files in SYSTEM32 to a .doc extension, etc but I was not able to clean certain items - I was not allowed to delete certain entries from the registry (in particular the RUN key) - seemed like a permissions problem. I ran recommended program in safe mode booting of XP and I cleaned everything it found and the machine seems much happier now!

What I would like to know is how you remove an item from the registry when you know its bad . I tried messing about with the permissions on the item but nothing worked.

... ... ...

Keep up the great work!

Regards

Peter

Peter,

There are several good free registry editors, watchers. See Free Registry Tools for more information. But the first step is easy to do with regular Windows registry editor (regex.exe):

Often spyware is pretty primitive and removal of the component that is installed in

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run

registry key disinfects the PC.

To do this follow the step outlines below. Be very careful working with the registry and do not delete entries just because they look suspicious. check each of them as outlined below:

  1. Open your registry in regedit
    • Click "start" (bottom left of your screen)
    • Select "Run"
    • Type "regedit" in the command line displayed
    • Click OK.
  2. In a tree that is shown select HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE
    • then click on + sign for the key SOFTWARE
    • then click on + sign for the key Microsoft
    • then click on + sign for the key Windows
    • then click on + sign for the key CurrentVersion
    • then click on + sign for the key Run
  3. Put a bookmark for the Run entry (Click Favorites, Add to Favorites and preserve the name Run that Microsoft Registry Editor suggests, so that you can gat tot he same place quickly if you need to.
  4. Print all entries (File, Print). Look for suspicious entries, that have strange names, load programs from strange locations, etc but don't take any actions on them.
  5. Open Windows Explorer Click on Tools, Folder options , View and and Details View and
    • uncheck:
      • Hide extensions for know file types
      • Hide protected operating system files
    • check
      • Show hidden files and folders
      • Remember each folder view setting

    click apply to all folders and OK.

  6. Find each suspicious file from the printed list of Run section and check the creation date. After that go to the listed directory find the file, left click and click on properties. Check Version section. If Description is missing, Version is missing or this is an unknown company, then the file is suspicious.
  7. For each suspicious file search Goggle. If Google search proves that this entry belongs to spyware simply delete the key.
  8. For each other file try to search Google. But be critical as for results. do not rush to delete it without additional consultation in one of the recommended in Fighting Adware/Spyware Paranoia page forums.

Trustworthy Anti-Spyware Products One basic tool in every user's toolbox of software ought to be an anti-spyware scanner. There are several excellent anti-spyware scanners available -- some free, some for pay. These include (but are not limited to): Ad-aware

  1. Microsoft AntiSpyware
  2. Pest Patrol
  3. Spybot Search & Destroy
  4. Spyware Doctor
  5. Webroot Spy Sweeper

Microsoft Windows AntiSpyware (Beta) Home

Microsoft Windows AntiSpyware (Beta) is a security technology that helps protect Windows users from spyware and other potentially unwanted software. Known spyware on your PC can be detected and removed. This helps reduce negative effects caused by spyware, including slow PC performance, annoying pop-up ads, unwanted changes to Internet settings, and unauthorized use of your private information. Continuous protection improves Internet browsing safety by guarding more than 50 ways spyware can enter your PC. Participants in the worldwide SpyNet™ community play a key role in determining which suspicious programs are classified as spyware. Microsoft researchers quickly develop methods to counteract these threats, and updates are automatically downloaded to your PC so you stay up to date.

Lavasoft now proposes free VX2 cleaner Software - Lavasoft

Lavasoft’s new plug-in VX2 Cleaner detects the malware VX2 and offers you the ability to remove it from your computer. Some users have experienced a very difficult variant of VX2 which cannot be removed by Ad-aware. For those users which have this variant, we have developed a plug-in to help you remove this VX2 variant. This VX2 variant registers itself in a way, which gives it system privileges. It also prevents the user from viewing this information by removing the user’s rights to do so. Furthermore it constantly monitors the registry and prevents any attempts to remove its associated values. This makes it very difficult for the user to manually remove it. The VX2 Cleaner works with all editions of Ad-Aware 6 build 181.

How to use Lavasoft’s VX2 Cleaner plug-in

Close Ad-Aware 6 build 181 and Ad-Watch (if running)
Download the free VX2 Cleaner here
Install the VX2 Cleaner
Start Ad-Aware 6 build 181
Go to “Plug-ins”
Select the VX2 Cleaner plug-in and click “Run Plugin”
If your computer isn’t infected, click “Close”.

XoftSpy free spyware removal tool that looks like scam. I found the following strongly negative review Lavasoft - Webhelper Review Xoftspy:

Webhelper Review: XOFTSPY Don't buy and here the reasons why

I have installed xoftspy and reviewed it. Here is my findings and what my thoughts are

1. PARETOLOGIC is the website the software is installed from. However, any business IMO that registers their site under Domains By Proxy in order to keep their true identity a secret is not a company I want to give money to.

2. The site is big on ad hype and getting affiliates to sell for them.

3. Domain names that are advertising the xoftpsy are the same that I was collecting about 3 weeks ago and then they were advertising the Spyhunter.

4. The sites below are all registered under Domains By Proxy so the real owners are not shown. The IP's show they are either one or more virutal servers that can have multiple domain names per 1 IP address.

Bottom Line: Would you give your money to someone who you cannot find out about. There is no statements of who or how the reference file of adware is updated. And like any Pyramid scheme, the main push is to get affiliates to sell for you, so much of the ad hype is directed in that area instead of supporting the end user that buys the software.

IMO: This is a scam.

Another review

PC Magazine - Member Ratings

fentleglowhardy
August 17, 2004
<
This is a good, professional product. Unlike Paretologic's Xoftspy reviewed by DenComp1 - which seems to just look for tracking cookies and a few well known entries in the registry, and mostly comes up with false positives, 5 out of 15 on my machine - Spy Sweeper scans for and finds problems, shows you what they are & removes them. This is a useful tool & deserves its 4 stars. Steer clear of the other - if I'd followed Xoftspy's advice I'd have removed my video driver, Netscape configuration entries, and part of Visual Basic

Getting rid of spyware

For $12 you can purchase Ad-Aware Plus, which includes a utility called Ad-Watch. Ad-Watch runs in the background monitoring for spyware trying to install itself. When spyware is detected, Ad-Watch blocks the installation, runs Ad-Aware and alerts you.

Recommended Links

Softpanorama hot topic of the month

Softpanorama Recommended

Microsoft

Adaware

Spybot S&D
 

Recommended Papers

PC Review - Spyware and Adware Removal

Tracking Cookies

If you are constantly prompted to remove 3rd party "Tracking Cookies" after scanning your machine with Ad-Aware or SpyBot then your IE  is not set up properly!

Many web pages write a cookie to your computer's hard disk to record when you visited their page and which pages you visited. The tracking cookie goes further and records details such as how long you stayed on a page, what you ordered, other pages you visited, and builds up a picture of your browsing. This information is reported back to the company that paid for this service.  Read Privacy pages of the companies you if you don't believe me. Or read an article by Keith Newman about it.

Mad about it? Don't get mad, get even. Put in Ad-Aware (it's free - click on 'Ad-Aware') and delete all tracking cookies regularly.

The HOSTS file and Restricted Zone (domains.reg) file both contain most of the "Tracking Cookies" listed in their database. The object is to prevent these (3rd party) Cookies from loading, not removing them "after the fact".

Netscape Navigator and Internet Explorer will still send out existing cookies even after disabling cookies in the browser settings. You must manually delete any/all cookie files on your system to eliminate being tracked by third-party ad networks or spyware or adware providers.

You can solve most of the tracking cookies problem with these two things: A malware-blocking hosts file and IE->Tools->Internet Options->Privacy tab->Advanced->Check "Override Automatic Cookie Handling", set Third-party Cookies (the ones used to track you across different web sites) to Block, and First-party to Enable or Prompt.

There are many arguments why cookies are not a bad thing at all.  Among their more benign uses are:

And, contrary to rumor, it is impossible for a cookie to transmit a worm or a virus. However, the opportunity to "personalize your web experience" by means of cookies recording your preferences and interests is a double-edged sword, because few consumers realize just how much information about themselves they are giving away as they surf the internet, and fewer still realize how easy it is for this "online profile" to be linked to their real identity.

Cookie Viewer [freeware] allows you to view information stored in a Cookie, delete unwanted Cookies on your hard drive. Note: when viewing Cookies stored on your drive if you discover any unwanted Cookies make a note of the server it is coming from (usually 3rd party) add that site to your "Always Block" list in the Internet Options | Privacy tab | Edit button. For home PC Patrol (Startup Manager) can help you manage Tracking Cookies.

See Usenet newsgroups for additional discussions about the removal of spyware from your system.


Etc

FAIR USE NOTICE This site contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of environmental, political, human rights, economic, democracy, scientific, and social justice issues, etc. We believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit exclusivly for research and educational purposes.   If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond 'fair use', you must obtain permission from the copyright owner. 

ABUSE: IPs or network segments from which we detect a stream of probes might be blocked for no less then 90 days. Multiple types of probes increase this period.  

Society

Groupthink : Two Party System as Polyarchy : Corruption of Regulators : Bureaucracies : Understanding Micromanagers and Control Freaks : Toxic Managers :   Harvard Mafia : Diplomatic Communication : Surviving a Bad Performance Review : Insufficient Retirement Funds as Immanent Problem of Neoliberal Regime : PseudoScience : Who Rules America : Neoliberalism  : The Iron Law of Oligarchy : Libertarian Philosophy

Quotes

War and Peace : Skeptical Finance : John Kenneth Galbraith :Talleyrand : Oscar Wilde : Otto Von Bismarck : Keynes : George Carlin : Skeptics : Propaganda  : SE quotes : Language Design and Programming Quotes : Random IT-related quotesSomerset Maugham : Marcus Aurelius : Kurt Vonnegut : Eric Hoffer : Winston Churchill : Napoleon Bonaparte : Ambrose BierceBernard Shaw : Mark Twain Quotes

Bulletin:

Vol 25, No.12 (December, 2013) Rational Fools vs. Efficient Crooks The efficient markets hypothesis : Political Skeptic Bulletin, 2013 : Unemployment Bulletin, 2010 :  Vol 23, No.10 (October, 2011) An observation about corporate security departments : Slightly Skeptical Euromaydan Chronicles, June 2014 : Greenspan legacy bulletin, 2008 : Vol 25, No.10 (October, 2013) Cryptolocker Trojan (Win32/Crilock.A) : Vol 25, No.08 (August, 2013) Cloud providers as intelligence collection hubs : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2010 : Inequality Bulletin, 2009 : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2008 : Copyleft Problems Bulletin, 2004 : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2011 : Energy Bulletin, 2010 : Malware Protection Bulletin, 2010 : Vol 26, No.1 (January, 2013) Object-Oriented Cult : Political Skeptic Bulletin, 2011 : Vol 23, No.11 (November, 2011) Softpanorama classification of sysadmin horror stories : Vol 25, No.05 (May, 2013) Corporate bullshit as a communication method  : Vol 25, No.06 (June, 2013) A Note on the Relationship of Brooks Law and Conway Law

History:

Fifty glorious years (1950-2000): the triumph of the US computer engineering : Donald Knuth : TAoCP and its Influence of Computer Science : Richard Stallman : Linus Torvalds  : Larry Wall  : John K. Ousterhout : CTSS : Multix OS Unix History : Unix shell history : VI editor : History of pipes concept : Solaris : MS DOSProgramming Languages History : PL/1 : Simula 67 : C : History of GCC developmentScripting Languages : Perl history   : OS History : Mail : DNS : SSH : CPU Instruction Sets : SPARC systems 1987-2006 : Norton Commander : Norton Utilities : Norton Ghost : Frontpage history : Malware Defense History : GNU Screen : OSS early history

Classic books:

The Peter Principle : Parkinson Law : 1984 : The Mythical Man-MonthHow to Solve It by George Polya : The Art of Computer Programming : The Elements of Programming Style : The Unix Hater’s Handbook : The Jargon file : The True Believer : Programming Pearls : The Good Soldier Svejk : The Power Elite

Most popular humor pages:

Manifest of the Softpanorama IT Slacker Society : Ten Commandments of the IT Slackers Society : Computer Humor Collection : BSD Logo Story : The Cuckoo's Egg : IT Slang : C++ Humor : ARE YOU A BBS ADDICT? : The Perl Purity Test : Object oriented programmers of all nations : Financial Humor : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2008 : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2010 : The Most Comprehensive Collection of Editor-related Humor : Programming Language Humor : Goldman Sachs related humor : Greenspan humor : C Humor : Scripting Humor : Real Programmers Humor : Web Humor : GPL-related Humor : OFM Humor : Politically Incorrect Humor : IDS Humor : "Linux Sucks" Humor : Russian Musical Humor : Best Russian Programmer Humor : Microsoft plans to buy Catholic Church : Richard Stallman Related Humor : Admin Humor : Perl-related Humor : Linus Torvalds Related humor : PseudoScience Related Humor : Networking Humor : Shell Humor : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2011 : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2012 : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2013 : Java Humor : Software Engineering Humor : Sun Solaris Related Humor : Education Humor : IBM Humor : Assembler-related Humor : VIM Humor : Computer Viruses Humor : Bright tomorrow is rescheduled to a day after tomorrow : Classic Computer Humor

The Last but not Least


Copyright © 1996-2016 by Dr. Nikolai Bezroukov. www.softpanorama.org was created as a service to the UN Sustainable Development Networking Programme (SDNP) in the author free time. This document is an industrial compilation designed and created exclusively for educational use and is distributed under the Softpanorama Content License.

The site uses AdSense so you need to be aware of Google privacy policy. You you do not want to be tracked by Google please disable Javascript for this site. This site is perfectly usable without Javascript.

Original materials copyright belong to respective owners. Quotes are made for educational purposes only in compliance with the fair use doctrine.

FAIR USE NOTICE This site contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available to advance understanding of computer science, IT technology, economic, scientific, and social issues. We believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided by section 107 of the US Copyright Law according to which such material can be distributed without profit exclusively for research and educational purposes.

This is a Spartan WHYFF (We Help You For Free) site written by people for whom English is not a native language. Grammar and spelling errors should be expected. The site contain some broken links as it develops like a living tree...

You can use PayPal to make a contribution, supporting development of this site and speed up access. In case softpanorama.org is down you can use the at softpanorama.info

Disclaimer:

The statements, views and opinions presented on this web page are those of the author (or referenced source) and are not endorsed by, nor do they necessarily reflect, the opinions of the author present and former employers, SDNP or any other organization the author may be associated with. We do not warrant the correctness of the information provided or its fitness for any purpose.

Last modified: May 08, 2017