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Dmitri Hvorostovsky - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Dmitri Aleksandrovich Hvorostovsky (Russian: Дмитрий Александрович Хворостовский, born October 16, 1962), is a leading opera singer from Russia.

Hvorostovsky was born in Krasnoyarsk in Siberia. He studied at the Krasnoyarsk School of Arts under Yekatherina Yofel and made his debut at Krasnoyarsk Opera House, in the role of Marullo in Rigoletto. He went on to win First Prize at both the Russian Glinka Competition in 1987 and the Toulouse Singing Competition in 1988. Hvorostovsky came to international prominence in 1989 when he won the Cardiff BBC Singer of the World competition, beating local favorite Bryn Terfel in the final round. His performance included Handel's Ombra mai fu and Per me giunto...O Carlo ascolta from Verdi's Don Carlo. His international concert recitals began immediately (London debut, 1989; New York 1990).

His operatic debut in the West was at the Nice Opera in The Queen of Spades (1989). In Italy he debuted at La Fenice as Eugene Onegin, a success that sealed his reputation, and made his American operatic debut with the Lyric Opera of Chicago (1993) in La traviata.

He has since sung at virtually every major opera house, including the Metropolitan Opera (debut 1995), the Royal Opera House at Covent Garden, the Berlin State Opera, La Scala and the Vienna State Opera. He is especially renowned for his portrayal of the title character in Tchaikovsky's Eugene Onegin; the New York Times described him as "born to play the role." [1]

In 2002, Hvorostovsky performed at the Russian Children's Welfare Society's major fund raiser, the "Petroushka Ball". He is an Honorary Director of the charity.[1][2]

A tall man with a striking head of prematurely silver hair, Hvorostovsky has achieved international acclaim as an opera performer as well as a concert artist. He was cast in People magazine's 50 most beautiful people, a rare occurrence for a classical musician. His high, medium-weight voice has the typical liquid timbre of Russian baritones.

Recently Hvorostovsky has been moving into more Verdi roles: in 2008 alone he will have sung in Un ballo in maschera, La traviata, Simon Boccanegra and Don Carlos [3] He has also appeared in Rigoletto and Il Trovatore in a David McVicar production at The Met with Sondra Radvanovsky.[4]


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[Nov 28, 2017] Dmitri Hvorostovsky, Silver-Maned Baritone From Siberia, Dies at 55 By ANTHONY TOMMASINI

Nov 22, 2017 | The New York Times

Dmitri Hvorostovsky, the charismatic Siberian baritone who won critical acclaim and devoted fans around the world for his burnished voice, uncanny breath control and rueful expressivity, died on Wednesday in London. He was 55.

Mark Hildrew of Askonas Holt, the talent management agency that represented Mr. Hvorostovsky, said the cause was brain cancer. Mr. Hvorostovsky announced the diagnosis in June 2015 and died in a hospice facility near his London home.

A favorite of audiences thanks to his alluring voice and heartthrob presence, Mr. Hvorostovsky cut a striking figure, his trim 6-foot-1 frame topped by a mane of prematurely white hair.

He also had a compelling personal story: He escaped the street-gang life as a teenager in a grim Siberian city, found his talent there despite the region's cultural isolation, and overcame a tempestuous drinking problem that could have ruined his career.

Mr. Hvorostovsky was essentially a lyric baritone with a lighter voice. But his distinctive sound - with its russet colorings and slightly hooded quality, combining Russian-style melancholy with velvety Italianate lyricism - was so penetrating, he could send big top notes soaring. He could command the stage, and at his best he was a nuanced actor.

[Nov 28, 2017] Dmitri Hvorostovsky - I Walk Out Alone Upon My Way - YouTube

[Nov 28, 2017] Dmitri Hvorostovsky - Korobyeiniki - YouTube